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Thread: Kilt Pin

  1. #21
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    O.C.R.

    I think that some people's idea of what makes a kilt pin would not be everyone's choice, or even traditional but, from memory the assorted kilt pins on show in that thread that you mentioned does show considerable "personal flair". Which is no bad thing on the whole.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 13th July 22 at 12:31 PM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    The traditional kilt pins I was showing aren't merely objects which someone has labelled "kilt pins", they are dedicated objects designed, made, and sold for the specific and sole purpose as being worn as kilt pins, in the same manner that "shoes" are objects designed, made, and sold for the sole purpose of covering the feet.
    I think maybe part of the difference is whether or not you see a kilt pin as a functional item, and also how traditional you want to be. If you do consider it "functional", than anything which fulfills the function of a kilt pin can be a kilt pin. For me, most of what I have are lightweight casuals, and without a kilt pin the wind picks up the outer apron quite readily. So I consider kilt pins a functional item for those kilts. Plus, I generally wear the kilt as regular dailywear clothing, and casuals are not exactly traditional no matter how you wear them. To each his own.

    On the other hand, my USA Kilts semi-trad is heavy enough it doesn't need one. It's not a functional item on it. And while I appreciate the look of a kilt pin as a decorative item, I'd rather not risk the damage from a kilt pin if it's not going to be functional, so I don't generally wear a pin on it.

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  5. #23
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    To pin or not?

    As one who has observed kilts worn in many settings and followed these pages for many years (here, then absent, then back) I can honestly say that all the conversations are illuminating as we examine the various perspectives expressed. A kilt is an article of clothing that invites interest and opinion. That is good as even there we see evolution of thought, expanding our ability to discuss the kilt as a many faceted icon of gentlemanly attire.

    I find myself inspired by this thread to keep an eye open for interesting items that might be turned to use as a kilt pin. The idea of being wary of pins that might cause damage is worthy of consideration. What a great group to spend some time with.

    One thought is of an experience I had back in . . . Lets see. It must have been about 2005. A party was held for the race committee for the Banderas Bay International Regatta, Mexico. As a member of the committee (Comite in espanol) I wore my Royal Stewart kilt over my boat mocs. An annoying wart of a gent came up to me and said, loudly, “No true Scot would wear those shoes with a kilt.” Proving he knew nothing about kilts or Scots.

    I replied, “A Scot will wear any damn thing he wants with his kilt!” The wart tried to persist in his interpretation of proper dress but everyone quickly tired of that conversation and the party went on while he was pointedly ignored. I stand by my comment to this day. The kilt is a comfortable, classy article of clothing that can be accessorized in myriad ways while still being a stand-out.

    And, as I tell the young men, “A kilt is a babe magnet.” That perks their ears up.

    Rev. Rick

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  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichiganKyle View Post
    I think maybe part of the difference is whether or not you see a kilt pin as a functional item, and also how traditional you want to be.
    I wasn't thinking about functionality- kilt pins are usually only pinned through the upper apron, and the traditional ones are made to be as lightweight as possible- so they're merely decorative, a bit of jewellery, or as the old catalogues call them "Highland ornaments".

    About the question of "how traditional" yes in a way, but I was thinking not so much about traditional versus nontraditional but thing versus not-thing.

    Say you're going to wear headwear and footwear with the kilt. A wide variety of headwear and footwear are seen, but what I can't recall seeing is people wearing not-headwear on their heads and not-footwear on their feet, with kilts.

    Makes sense: headwear is designed, made, and sold to be worn on the head and footwear is designed, made, and sold to be worn on the feet.

    And sporrans are designed, made, and sold to be worn on the front of the kilt to hold things. Not-sporrans are not designed, made, and sold for that purpose.

    Likewise not-kilt-pins are not designed, made, and sold solely for the purpose of wearing on the kilt.

    Which brings us around to title of this thread: "Kilt Pin". The term "kilt pin" has throughout the 20th century had a specific type of thing to which it referred.

    The next question is "does pinning a not-kilt-pin onto a kilt shift the object to the category of kilt pin?"

    For me it doesn't, any more than strapping an old army ammo pouch around the kilt shift the object to the category of "sporran", or wrapping a bedsheet around your body shift that object to the category of "shirt".
    Last edited by OC Richard; 16th July 22 at 04:08 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  8. #25
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    ... made my own ...KILT PIM.jpg
    Last edited by Ninehostages; 17th July 22 at 05:24 AM. Reason: photo
    Those ancient U Nialls from Donegal were a randy bunch.

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  10. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    And sporrans are designed, made, and sold to be worn on the front of the kilt to hold things. Not-sporrans are not designed, made, and sold for that purpose.

    Likewise not-kilt-pins are not designed, made, and sold solely for the purpose of wearing on the kilt.
    Not-kilt-pins may not be designed as such, but I think they can fill the role perfectly. And once they're attached, does it matter if they were intended as such?

    To me, the kilt pin is a decorative brooch that gives you a lot of freedom of expression. For example, that Lothlorien pin from above works perfectly for what a kilt pin does: accessorize and personalize. Would I call it a kilt pin? It is used as one, so in that particular moment, yes. Conversely, if you were to wear a kilt pin as a brooch on a coat or jacket, I don't think there is a way to know that it was intended as a kilt pin by the maker.

    The next question is "does pinning a not-kilt-pin onto a kilt shift the object to the category of kilt pin?"
    I would say so, but only temporary.

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  12. #27
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    I think we can go round splitting hairs about what does and does not make a kilt pin for eternity. There are to my eye some absolutely dreadful kilt pins that are specifically made and sold as kilt pins. Likewise, there are some absolutely stunningly effective bits of jewellery/baubles/eye candy that have no connection to kilts whatsoever that make highly effective kilt pins. Its the age old problem ; "beauty is seen through the eye of the beholder" and as we all know, sometimes, we will not agree. As this classic discussion illustrates so well.

    So, if we want to go "off piste" with our choices we run the risk of a hazardous journey whilst hoping for a thrilling ride. Likewise, sticking to the safe routes with our choices can lead to an oh so boring route which does not always offer a safe journey either.

    Personally, labelling bits of jewellery as "kiltpins" is just a marketing ploy to broaden the market and to catch the unwary and unknowing out. The myriad of pretty ordinary, dreadful even, sword style of kilt pins seen everywhere in kilt shops is a sad testimony to this. However, there are some superb exceptions within and outwith the "norm" that are around too, if we have the eye to see it.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 25th July 22 at 10:54 AM. Reason: can't spell
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  14. #28
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    When I was young (the 1940s/50s), the commonest kilt pin was just a blanket pin i.e. large safety pin
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Safety-Blan...07MY6ZZ6B?th=1

    Alan

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  16. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by neloon View Post
    When I was young (the 1940s/50s), the commonest kilt pin was just a blanket pin i.e. large safety pin
    That’s interesting because it’s a ‘not kilt pin’ and barely decorative!

    John
    Last edited by Nemuragh; 25th July 22 at 07:39 AM.

  17. #30
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    Why are we stuck with a kilt pin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    So, if we want to go "off piste" with our choices we run the risk of a hazardous journey whilst hoping for a thrilling ride.
    Sounds like a fellow swordsman. I have long said every gentleman should learn to handle a sword - it improves your attitude. Wisdom can come with a sword in hand.

    Style can show a sword on a kilt. The story was, the pin was intended to keep the front apron from flipping up in a breeze. Others suggest it is a bit of male vanity. Whatever it represents, it is indeed a personal adornment, just for fun and less permanent than a tattoo (the inked kind).

    Happy kilting. Be not trepidacious when trottin’ out the tartan.

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