X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information Houston Kiltmakers Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    2nd October 04
    Location
    Page/Lake Powell, Arizona USA
    Posts
    14,151
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rafting Kilted down the Grand Canyon....again...Utilikilt Question

    So headed down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon next month. My 4th trip - love the place. I've worn a wool kilt down canyon before. This trip I'm considering wearing my Utilikilt Survivor II in ACU camo.

    I love all the pockets. Keeps stuff handy. Great for side canyon hikes too.

    But it's cotton. Know it'll get wet. August is monsoon season here so what the whitewater doesn't soak, the rain will.

    Sitting kilted on a river raft may present some modesty issues - can use the modesty rigging on the Survivor for that - I think.

    Any of the Rabble have any experience with a cotton utility kilt around water?

    Can always take it and just wear it for camp wear at the end of the day...but would like to try it on the raft - without being stupid.

    Thanks



    Will be rafting downstream from here



    Then under this bridge on the river below on the far right.
    Ol' Macdonald himself, a proud son of Skye and Cape Breton Island
    Lifetime Member STA. Two time winner of Utilikiltarian of the Month.
    "I'll have a kilt please, a nice hand sewn tartan, 16 ounce Strome. Oh, and a sporran on the side, with a strap please."

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Riverkilt For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,958
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally Ron - and for the same reason that Life Jackets are required - I would assume that I could end up out of the boat, in the water, being tumbled end over end, and would wear clothing appropriate to the activity.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  4. The Following 7 Users say 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    2nd October 04
    Location
    Page/Lake Powell, Arizona USA
    Posts
    14,151
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For sure, thanks, but these are the big rafts that just don't flip...course I could get tossed out by the action of the whitewater...doesn't happen often, but does happen to a few. Would have to hope the modesty rigging of the Survival would hold up in the water.

    Last edited by Riverkilt; 25th July 20 at 11:40 AM.
    Ol' Macdonald himself, a proud son of Skye and Cape Breton Island
    Lifetime Member STA. Two time winner of Utilikiltarian of the Month.
    "I'll have a kilt please, a nice hand sewn tartan, 16 ounce Strome. Oh, and a sporran on the side, with a strap please."

  6. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Riverkilt For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    21st December 05
    Location
    Hawick, Scotland
    Posts
    11,024
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would be more worried about all the mud and silt which the kilt would pick up in the water, rather than being too bothered whether the kilt is basic cotton or basic wool. In wet weather here in Scotland I prefer the teflon coated wool kilts from Houstons of Paisley as the rain tends to run off these better.
    Vice-President and Regional Director for Scotland for Clan Cunningham International, and a Scottish Armiger.

  8. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to cessna152towser For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    2nd October 04
    Location
    Page/Lake Powell, Arizona USA
    Posts
    14,151
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Alex, good point. It's machine washable when I get home but meantime the silt from the muddy monsoon waters could make it heavy...and a nightmare to pack in the small duffle allowed...in a zip lock bag for sure.

    Think I'm gonna put it on and go out in the back yard and hose it down and see how it fares.
    Ol' Macdonald himself, a proud son of Skye and Cape Breton Island
    Lifetime Member STA. Two time winner of Utilikiltarian of the Month.
    "I'll have a kilt please, a nice hand sewn tartan, 16 ounce Strome. Oh, and a sporran on the side, with a strap please."

  10. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Riverkilt For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Join Date
    29th April 18
    Location
    Western Michigan
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Perhaps one of the acrylic versions of a "modern" kilt? I've also seen acrylic/wool blends with pockets as well. It might avoid the cotton issues. I've go no experience for that suggestion. My kilts are wool or cotton.
    Acrylics are for the most part, inexpensive. The blend fabrics a bit pricier but still not wool pricing. Besides it's a reason for yet another kilt. You have, after all, downsized your closet after you downsized yourself.

  12. #7
    Join Date
    2nd October 04
    Location
    Page/Lake Powell, Arizona USA
    Posts
    14,151
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, Polyviscose kilts also are lighter and take up less space in the limited baggage allowed when flying out of the canyon. May choose to take the USA Kilts Casual in Scott Green that I have that fits me now. Just had the wool 5 yard Scott Green from USA Kilts last trip....time is too short to order a new one. Was gonna, but just didn't find a tartan I wanted for it. Scott fits though since my grandmother Rose Scott was the first in the family to visit the Grand Canyon back in the 1920s.
    Ol' Macdonald himself, a proud son of Skye and Cape Breton Island
    Lifetime Member STA. Two time winner of Utilikiltarian of the Month.
    "I'll have a kilt please, a nice hand sewn tartan, 16 ounce Strome. Oh, and a sporran on the side, with a strap please."

  13. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Riverkilt For This Useful Post:


  14. #8
    Join Date
    14th July 15
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    450
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey there,

    My comments are somewhat related to your post. Summer last, I hiked up the Cobbler in Arrochar with some friends. It was warm-ish and the weather ranged from fine mist to outright downpours. I hiked in my favourite Bedrock sandals (no problems there) and an older-school cotton Survival. A merino wool T-shirt on top. The relevant message to your post is about 1/2 to 2/3 of the way up to the Cobbler, I realised my mistake: the cotton Survival was 100% soaked and while I was hiking upwards, my body heat did its job and kept me moderately warm. But when I stopped at the top to eat and then while walking ALL THE WAY DOWN, it was horrific. The wet cotton obviously didn't dry out, it kept all the water, and I was starting to get chilled. By the time I returned to "base camp", I stripped down and, shivering in moderately warm weather, put on other clothes. My success was the merino wool top layers I had been wearing. Even though that original T-shirt was soaked, I was warm enough. I will never hike in a cotton kilt again -- perhaps a polyviscose one from Rocky and Co., but whenever there's a chance of being stuck in the rain, I'll always go wool.

    (I had a decent rain jacket at the beginning but it was warm enough that I was getting wet from my own sweat. I removed it and I then got wet from the rain -- which I preferred!)

    Good luck on your adventure!
    Jonathan

  15. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to jthk For This Useful Post:


  16. #9
    Join Date
    2nd October 04
    Location
    Page/Lake Powell, Arizona USA
    Posts
    14,151
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most relevant and my big fear, thank you. I am taking all kinds of merino wool from neck band thingie, to gloves, to vest, to sox. Wool helps cool in the heat when its wet but also make the 47 degree river water tolerable...keeps the blood cool.

    I was gonna put the Survival on and hose it down in the back yard but didn't take a genius to figure out what a mess that would be. Have worn cotton survivals on flat water but whitewater is different.

    Thanks for the reality check.
    Ol' Macdonald himself, a proud son of Skye and Cape Breton Island
    Lifetime Member STA. Two time winner of Utilikiltarian of the Month.
    "I'll have a kilt please, a nice hand sewn tartan, 16 ounce Strome. Oh, and a sporran on the side, with a strap please."

  17. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Riverkilt For This Useful Post:


  18. #10
    Join Date
    14th July 15
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    450
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sure thing. I vividly remember the sopping wet, cold cotton Utilikilt on me as I slogged up and down the Cobbler. I won't ever make that mistake again!

    GOOD LUCK! and have fun!

    Jonathan


    Quote Originally Posted by Riverkilt View Post
    Most relevant and my big fear, thank you. I am taking all kinds of merino wool from neck band thingie, to gloves, to vest, to sox. Wool helps cool in the heat when its wet but also make the 47 degree river water tolerable...keeps the blood cool.

    I was gonna put the Survival on and hose it down in the back yard but didn't take a genius to figure out what a mess that would be. Have worn cotton survivals on flat water but whitewater is different.

    Thanks for the reality check.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0