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Thread: Sweater vest

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    The trouble with all of these terms is that they morph and slide back and forth. I was always taught that "Formal" meant white tie and tails. "Semi-formal meant dinner jacket (black or white) and black tie - what Americans call a tuxedo. Below that was "Business" which was a lounge suit and "Casual" which meant everything else.

    Those are simply not the way the terms are used today, and frankly, if you go across the county line they'll be used differently. End result: the terminology is worthless.
    I agree. Growing up in rural Tennessee, we had "church clothes" and "work clothes", basically. And usually, your "church clothes" often became your "work clothes" when your current items were worn out. You then got new church clothes.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crag Forster View Post
    Enjoyed reading this thread and thought I would just add a photo of a sweater vest incorporated with a jacket and tie.

    Craig Forster
    Here is your picture:

    If you are going to do it, do it in a kilt!

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    I am afraid to say that as this is an international website, then advice comes in all varieties of English and national terminologies, particularly as we are discussing a Scottish garment then I am sorry to say that I am unable to speak in "Americanese". Thus far, over the last decade or so on this website I have managed transatlantic discussions pretty well----there has been the odd hicup on occasion-------- and there has been a refreshing willingness from the USA to learn from this side of the Atlantic specifically on kilt matters and kilt terminology. I am sorry that my advice has been so readily dismissed by you. No hard feelings though.
    I appreciate the phrase "smart dress". While it's not in my daily vocabulary, I understand it and appreciate the imagery it provides.

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  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntgathergrow View Post
    I appreciate the phrase "smart dress". While it's not in my daily vocabulary, I understand it and appreciate the imagery it provides.
    I think the UK term "smart" is what we in the US would call "sharp". Everybody who knows their ZZ Top understands the concept of a sharp dressed man. (I hear that every girl is crazy about them.)

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  9. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingandrew View Post
    .....Regarding the Silicon Valley definition of "business attire,"......

    Andrew
    Back when I was race crew for a local sports car racer, he was a lead designer for IBM. I joked they would toss him a room, & tell him not to come out until he had designed 'X'. By that time, IBM had slightly relaxed the dress code. White shirt not required. He went to work with shirt / tie, daily......sometimes, a sweater vest. Hanging behind the office door was a garment bag, containing a white shirt, & a couple of jackets that would work with whatever pants he was wearing. In the event the Elite of IBM were coming to see him, which was fairly commom. Contrast (recently), an acquaintance(mid-40's) left one of the local tech giants, for another. First job wardrobe was as Tobus has describe. New company, jeans, t-shirt, hooded sweatshirt. Days of meetings, he makes things look matchy. To keep us, faintly, on the thread subject........he will wear a sweater vest over a white t-shirt.
    Last edited by Baeau; 7th December 18 at 07:16 PM.
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

  10. #26
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    Alright, lets try this.

    Formal evening attire from kilted Scots(UK)point of view is equivalent to white tie and tails and black tie dinner jacket(tux) and is I think is possibly understood the world over.

    Formal day attire from a kilted Scots(UK) point of view is equivalent to morning dress--morning suit(tails but NOT the same style of jacket as the tails of evening attire)and a drop down tie. This is probably more easily understood in the UK and perhaps Europe, although I understand morning dress is worn by some on occasion in the USA too.

    Smart attire from a kilted Scots(UK) point of view is equivalent to business/lounge suits, blazer and flannels and sports jacket and pressed cords/cavalry twill/flannel trousers. A tie would probably be worn as might a waistcoat and with well polished shoes. NOT boots.

    Casual attire from a kilted Scots( UK) point of view would be equivalent to anything else although judgement and discretion of attire is still required. However casual attire does not usually mean scruffy, although it might!

    There are grey areas where smart and casual might overlap a tad, but not by much.

    Hope this helps.

    An afterthought.

    I hope our friends from outwith Scotland and the UK will note in the above that from the kilted Scots(UK) view on these things then there is no mention of that dreadful term "semi dress/semi formal"!
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 7th December 18 at 03:19 PM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  12. #27
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    I am not sure that it is correct to say that formal dress conventions are a particularly “kilted Scots (UK)” point of view as I posted an American guide to formal dress ( https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/tu...k-tie-matters/ ) albeit not one that included a reference to highland dress. I am firmly of the opinion that dress conventions on both sides of the Atlantic are broadly similar but that such conventions are more and more frequently ignored, both here in the UK and across the Atlantic. Suffice it to say that one of the last bastions of correctness in dress is this website where appropriate attire is exhaustively discussed. As such I can only support it unreservedly.

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  14. #28
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    A quick note on the Gentleman's Gazette that has been linked to: The author resides in the US currently, but was born and raised in Germany. I don't think his site is very good evidence of American formality, so much as a European attempting to guide Americans on his idea of formality.

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wareyin View Post
    A quick note on the Gentleman's Gazette that has been linked to: The author resides in the US currently, but was born and raised in Germany. I don't think his site is very good evidence of American formality, so much as a European attempting to guide Americans on his idea of formality.
    I don’t think I included that link as a definitive guide to formality in American dress, just as an example that such a thing exists. Perhaps you could point us towards a more apposite guide by a more acceptable native born American rather than this European immigrant parvenu.

  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    I don’t think I included that link as a definitive guide to formality in American dress, just as an example that such a thing exists. Perhaps you could point us towards a more apposite guide by a more acceptable native born American rather than this European immigrant parvenu.
    I would be happy to, if I was aware of the existence of such a thing. Sadly, I suppose the best example we will be able to find of American formality guides will remain that of a German telling us Americans how to do it.

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