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  1. #1
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    Fraser Ross catalogue 1920s

    The Montrose thread made me break out the Fraser Ross catalogue and realise I hadn't edited the photos I had.

    Just did that, so here it is! Most of it, anyhow. There's a page showing a female Highland Dance outfit and a page showing a male Pipe Band outfit that just aren't interesting to me.

    So here goes:



















    Last edited by OC Richard; 31st July 18 at 06:45 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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  3. #2
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    A wonderful set of images. Thanks for posting them.

  4. #3
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    Thanks!

    Some observations about the Fraser Ross catalogue:

    -Many will take exception to some of their assertions, such as the kilt coming mid-knee and pinning the kilt pin through both aprons.

    -Note that the two 19th century Evening jacket styles (Doublet and Argyll) have been joined by two new 20th century styles, the Coatee and the Montrose. The Montrose is illustrated, and mentioned, to be a youth style (though it says for men too).

    -Note also the Evening jacket styles which are missing: the Kenmore and Sheriffmuir had evidently not yet been devised. (Anderson's takes credit in their catalogues for inventing the Kenmore.)

    -I believe this catalogue captures a transitional time when the new small sealskin pocket-shaped Evening sporrans were coming into style. Note that the description of Evening Dress mentions hair sporrans, and only hair sporrans are shown on the page devoted to Evening Dress sporrans. Yet, the two new jacket styles (Coatee and Montrose) and one of the old jacket styles (the Doublet) are shown with the new-pattern Evening sporrans.

    -In keeping with all other early catalogues only brown Day sporrans are shown.

    -The dirk illustrated is a Gordon Highlanders Officer's dirk.

    -The diced hose have marl turnover cuffs, in keeping with The Highlanders Of Scotland and the uniform of the 79th New York State Militia, to name two.

    -Note the "full check hose", a style seen in The Highlanders Of Scotland and in Victorian photographs but which has seemingly fallen from favour. They are distinct from diced hose or tartan hose.

    -As usual, there's no date on this catalogue, though the female hairstyles place it in the 1920s.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 31st July 18 at 07:07 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

  5. #4
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    Note the "full check hose", a style seen in The Highlanders Of Scotland and in Victorian photographs but which has seemingly fallen from favour. They are distinct from diced hose or tartan hose.


    found these socks with a (checked top).
    https://www.newforestclothing.co.uk/...ing-socks.htmlClick image for larger version. 

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    "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.' Benjamin Franklin

  6. #5
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    I also noticed with interest that the kilts shown are only pleated to the stripe, not to the sett. Are there any other depictions you know of from that era that would show otherwise, Richard?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richrail View Post
    Note the "full check hose", a style seen in The Highlanders Of Scotland and in Victorian photographs but which has seemingly fallen from favour. They are distinct from diced hose or tartan hose.


    found these socks with a (checked top).
    https://www.newforestclothing.co.uk/...ing-socks.htmlClick image for larger version. 

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ID:	34636
    Excellent find Richrail! And very good pricepoint. Thanks! I will be ordering some.

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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manu View Post
    Excellent find Richrail! And very good pricepoint. Thanks! I will be ordering some.
    Just my luck, they only have one size, and (as usual) it's too large for me.

    Be advised that shooting socks tend to be longer than proper kilt hose. I believe they're intended to be worn all the way up to the bottom of the knee, instead of being shy of the knee by a few finger widths like kilt hose. If you have longer shins than most people, it may not be an issue. But I seem to recall that some people in the past have encountered trouble with making shooting socks work as kilt hose. I have not personally done it, though, so I can't state that with certainty.

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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    ....I also noticed with interest that the kilts shown are only pleated to the stripe, not to the sett......
    Maybe, done with the black & white printing (& paper used) in mind. A decision made for visual appeal, ease of doing the drawings,??
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    Just my luck, they only have one size, and (as usual) it's too large for me.

    Be advised that shooting socks tend to be longer than proper kilt hose. I believe they're intended to be worn all the way up to the bottom of the knee, instead of being shy of the knee by a few finger widths like kilt hose. If you have longer shins than most people, it may not be an issue. But I seem to recall that some people in the past have encountered trouble with making shooting socks work as kilt hose. I have not personally done it, though, so I can't state that with certainty.
    That's a good point. Thanks! I have a pair of diced top house of cheviot that in afraid are shooting socks. I have to fold over under the actual cuff to shorten it and I end up with a thicker cuff. Im 5'10", so pretty average shin length.

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I also noticed with interest that the kilts shown are only pleated to the stripe, not to the sett. Are there any other depictions you know of from that era that would show otherwise, Richard?
    Trouble is, kilts are usually seen from the front in photos etc. With so little of the kilt's pleating visible I'm not sure if we can tell.

    Peter probably knows the timeline of when to-the-sett pleating became popular for civilian kilts (it never took hold in the army).
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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