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  1. #1
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    Gauntlet/Argyll Cuff

    I'm looking for some help amongst those members who own more vintage jackets.

    Namely, I hoping for photos of how your gauntlet/argyll cuffed jacket cuffs are constructed. Specifically those jackets where the cuffs are not a single piece of fabric simply just sown directly to the sleeve, but stand apart and off of the jacket.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Frank
    Drink to the fame of it -- The Tartan!
    Murdoch Maclean

  2. #2
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    I looked through my vintage jackets, and I have three of them with gauntlet cuffs that are not simply extra material stitched to the outside of the sleeve (and a few more that are). I've taken photos of each of these three, and will post them in separate posts.

    The first one is the jacket that I would consider the best made, due to the quality of the fabric and the hand stitching. You'll notice that its details are a bit different than my other two, which I will post shortly.

    As you can see below, the cuff is a separate piece of material, and there's a seam at the very end of the cuff where the gauntlet attaches. It is lined between the cuff and the sleeve (using the same lining as inside the torso of the jacket, but different than the sleeve lining). The cuff has a bar stitch on the long pointy side, but the points themselves hang past the stitch. On the inside, the tweed material extends about 1.5 inches inside the sleeve before the sleeve lining starts.


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  4. #3
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    This is jacket #2. As you can see, there is no seam at the end of the cuff like the first one had. The gauntlet material seems to start inside the sleeve where the sleeve lining stops, and rolls around the end of the sleeve and back outside to form the cuff. But it does have lining between the cuff and sleeve (again, the same lining as inside the torso of the jacket, not the sleeve lining). The bar stitch at the points of the cuff is near the tip of the points.


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  6. #4
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    Here's jacket #3. Similar construction to #2, in that the gauntlet material starts inside the sleeve at the end of the sleeve lining and turns at the end of the sleeve to form the cuff. As with the others, it uses the jacket torso lining between the cuff and sleeve. The bar stitch placement is more like #1, leaving the points of the cuff a bit more free.


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  8. #5
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    Tobus, thanks for all the photos and for taking the time to do this for me.

    The reason for the request will come up in a future thread.

    Frank
    Drink to the fame of it -- The Tartan!
    Murdoch Maclean

  9. #6
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    I went to the closet to take pictures of my c1960s blue check tweed Argyll but then was quite confused when I didn’t see it hanging up. Then I remembered I have to go pick it up from the seamstress, I had the waist taken in.
    “The convents which the fathers had destroyed...the sons, rebuilt…”
    —Hereward the Wake, ‘Of the Fens’

  10. #7
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    Threads like this are great because members like Tobus will post great photos and information, and also they force me to take a look at aspects of my own clothes that I hadn't thought about.

    Here are my tweed Argylls L-R labelled "Made In Scotland", "Made In United Kingdom", and "Cooper & McKenzie Made In United Kingdom".

    As you see only the Cooper & McKenzie has actual cuffs.



    Here's a cuff turned out. It's only held by a short bit of stitching at the base of the points



    Another view.



    At the bottom the outside tweed just turns over, and goes up around an inch where it's let into the satin lining.

    One could, my merely undoing the bit of stitching at the cuff-points, shorten or lengthen the sleeves without having to do any other sewing.

    Overall, the Cooper & McKenzie cuffs most resemble Tobus' jacket #3.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 17th February 20 at 06:07 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    One could, my merely undoing the bit of stitching at the cuff-points, shorten or lengthen the sleeves without having to do any other sewing.
    Or replace if worn, with little change in the jacket. Very similar to a turned up cuff on Saxon style jacket, and the same purpose.

    Thanks for the photos OCR.

    Once again, I'll have a post for this section of the forum, very soon.

    Frank
    Drink to the fame of it -- The Tartan!
    Murdoch Maclean

  13. #9
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    This is an interesting thread. I decided to look at my vintage jackets with Argyll cuffs, what I found was that only one of them was not sewn down completely, that one is from the 1940's. Here are some photos

    Group shot from Left to Right: Blue Argyll from I think the 1980's, Brown Argyll from the 1940's, Russet Brown Argyll from 1894, Velvet Doublet from 1911.

    (Note that the only jacket with imitation horn is the blue argyll from the 1980's)









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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Highland Logan View Post
    I'm looking for some help amongst those members who own more vintage jackets.

    Namely, I hoping for photos of how your gauntlet/argyll cuffed jacket cuffs are constructed. Specifically those jackets where the cuffs are not a single piece of fabric simply just sown directly to the sleeve, but stand apart and off of the jacket.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Frank
    Frank,

    Checked mine to see if it was any help to you but mine is sewn down all the way around. Looks like you've gotten everything you need here but just in case it's of use, you can have a look at or borrow mine any time.

    Shane

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