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  1. #1
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    Interesting kilt jacket pattern

    I was doing some exploring trying to find a pattern for an Argyll jacket, and ran across this:



    The "Monte Carlo" would seem to just be a simple kilt jacket -- sans funky cuffs. Then there's the "Neglige" (!), which looks like an Ike jacket of sorts.

    But look at the guy on the left -- the "Dresden." It's like a double-breasted version of the regimental doublet.

    I must have one.

    Anyway, here's the "Highland doublet" pattern:



    And if you want kilting information, try this (and note the variations on box pleating!!!):



    For those who want to explore more, here is the page. It's mostly Victoriana.

    Tony

  2. #2
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    11th August 12
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    Wowee! Nice find. Thank you for sharing.

  3. #3
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    Is that variation on box pleating, diagram 88, what Matt strenuously, but with sound reasoning, resists calling (hushed tones) military box pleating? In general, might he refer to it as the basis for a "Box pleated kilt of >4 yards"?
    Grizzled Ian
    XMTS teaches much about formal kilt wear, but otherwise,
    ... the kilt is clothes, what you wear with it should be what you find best suits you and your lifestyle. (Anne the Pleater)
    "Sometimes, it is better not to know the facts" (Father Bill)

  4. #4
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    Ah, the Costumer's Manifesto. I get lost on that website everytime I visit.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzled Ian View Post
    Is that variation on box pleating, diagram 88, what Matt strenuously, but with sound reasoning, resists calling (hushed tones) military box pleating? In general, might he refer to it as the basis for a "Box pleated kilt of >4 yards"?

    Yes.
    The Official [BREN]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    7th July 09
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    Here is a diagram that has been knocking about the forum for a few years that shows a number of the various styles of kilt pleating

    Shoot straight you bastards. Don't make a mess of it. Harry (Breaker) Harbord Morant - Bushveldt Carbineers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Very interesting! The "Dresden" is the standard "doublet" which was by far the most common style of dressy kilt jacket from the mid-19th century up through the early years of the 20th century, when a new suite of formal kilt jackets (Prince Charlie Coatee, Montrose Doublet, Kenmore Doublet) pushed it out of favour. And now with several civilian dress doublets in competition it needed a more specific name which is "Regulation Doublet".

    These photos of the old doublet, dressed up with piping, show the cut very clearly





    Here's another good view of it, a plain one

    Last edited by OC Richard; 2nd April 13 at 05:17 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Very interesting! The "Dresden" is the standard "doublet" which was by far the most common style of dressy kilt jacket from the mid-19th century up through the early years of the 20th century, when a new suite of formal kilt jackets (Prince Charlie Coatee, Montrose Doublet, Kenmore Doublet) pushed it out of favour. And now with several civilian dress doublets in competition it needed a more specific name which is "Regulation Doublet".

    These photos of the old doublet, dressed up with piping, show the cut very clearly





    Here's another good view of it, a plain one

    I like it!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    22nd January 13
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    OC Richard,
    I really appreciate your sharing with the membership the fruits of your collection of these old images, whether posed photographs like these, or the old catalogues, and sharing the knowledge that you have gained about all sorts of features of highland dress.

    Downunder Kilt,
    does the diagram that you included appear on the Lady Chrystel's website? When I asked her, she said that she does not make kilts in either of the rolled styles depicted. I am looking forward to the day when I can send her material to make me a double-box pleat kilt, though.

    But the two rolled styles don't give a really good indication of the depth of pleat possible, because they only show a single pleat. Until I have a go at making a kilt myself, I can only suspect that variation in the depth of the back pleat is one of the variables to be considered in solving the pleat to sett and pleat to stripe problems posed in tartans with different width setts. Anyway, the second rolled style is the same arrangement as Diagram 88 in the OP, except that it goes in the opposite direction and the back pleat is not as deep. The first rolled style is not depicted in AJB's OP.
    Grizzled Ian
    XMTS teaches much about formal kilt wear, but otherwise,
    ... the kilt is clothes, what you wear with it should be what you find best suits you and your lifestyle. (Anne the Pleater)
    "Sometimes, it is better not to know the facts" (Father Bill)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    7th July 09
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    The diagram has appeared in a number of places over the years and I was once told who drew it up, but that info now alludes me. Lady Chystel may well have been the original source. As I said, it has been on this forum for many years, so someone maybe able to give us the definative source. As to the two rolled pleat drawings, it would be nice to see more pleats, side by side, as you suggest.
    Shoot straight you bastards. Don't make a mess of it. Harry (Breaker) Harbord Morant - Bushveldt Carbineers

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