X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    4,939
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Clan-motif lapel pins. Thoughts?

    As I was digging through my kilt paraphernalia the other day, I rediscovered a couple of lapel pins that my mother bought on one of her trips to Scotland. These were some of the items left to me when she died just over 7 years ago, and I thought it might be a nice touch to wear them on occasion.



    The one at left is a simple stag's head, and the other is a miniature Colquhoun clan badge with grouse feathers mounted behind it. These were no doubt picked up in some tourist shop which likely sold all manner of clan crest/tartan tat. They are nothing special, really, except for their sentimental value.

    Lapel pins are not often discussed as a kilt accessory here on the forum. Why not? Are they considered over-the-top or "gilding the lily"? I know that there are certain times when lapel pins are expected, such as wearing a poppy on Remembrance Day. But aside from that, what is the general consensus on wearing them with smart daywear? I've seen various photos of lapel pins being worn by clan chiefs (Cluny, especially, wore his clan crest with a plant badge on it), as well as others in smart daywear with small items on their lapels that are too small to be identified.

    I'm generally not one to go overboard on clan badge merchandise. The only one I typically wear is on my Balmoral. My kilt pin is always a simple blanket pin. With that in mind, I would think that perhaps the simple stag's head pin might not overdo it when paired with a Balmoral clan badge. Or wearing the grouse feather clan badge pin when not wearing a Balmoral and no other clan badge present.

    What is the Scots traditionalist (TCHD) thinking on it? Are lapel pins the norm for smart daywear? Are they seen as overdoing it? Or is it just personal preference, without much thought given?

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Tobus For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    13th March 05
    Location
    Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (OCONCAN)
    Posts
    3,618
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mine is not a Scots perspective, but a Canadian one. I like wearing lapel pins on my jackets. I have a small clan one similar to the one in the right of your picture, minus the feathers, and I only wear it when I'm not wearing a kilt. Wearing it with a kilt is just a little much for me. I would wear the stag's head one with a kilt, though.
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove."

  4. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Macman For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,568
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  6. #4
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    13,588
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would have thought that several yards of Clan tartan in kilt form would be more than sufficient to tell the world who you are batting for!
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  7. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Jock Scot For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    21st May 08
    Location
    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,610
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tobus, those are certainly ladies' brooches. I agree with Jock that yards of tartan is sufficient, since you are asking about daywear. If you are wearing a Balmoral, with a belted crest, anything more is gilding the lilly. There are times, however, when a discrete lapel badge is appropriate. For example, that you are a recipient of an honour such as OBE, OC, etc., or if you wish to declare your connection to some non-clan organisation such as the British Legion (or XMarks). The key, of course, in even those instances is 'discrete'.

  9. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to ThistleDown For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    12th January 13
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    255
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know that they're women's pins. I can't see stags and grouse feathers being marketed to women (we're not supposed to be into such unfeminine things as that). Thistles and knots and sparkly stuff, sure.

    Besides, pins I see with a similar structure at highland suppliers are called "lapel pins"-- which usually are men's wear-- not "brooches."
    Here's tae us - / Wha's like us - / Damn few - / And they're a' deid - /
    Mair's the pity!

  11. #7
    Join Date
    21st May 08
    Location
    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,610
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Katia View Post
    I don't know that they're women's pins. I can't see stags and grouse feathers being marketed to women (we're not supposed to be into such unfeminine things as that). Thistles and knots and sparkly stuff, sure.
    I see you are in the US, Katia, so you may be correct for your location. Others will have to speak to that. In the Highland tradition, however, women have worn jeweled grouse claws and little feathered brooches from Victorian times -- and many still do. It's men who don't wear that sort of thing. Lapel simply means where these things are usually worn, and just because they are marketed by tat shops today as men's wear doesn't mean they are 'traditionally' men's wear.

    Last edited by ThistleDown; 28th November 18 at 07:31 PM. Reason: spell 'jeweled', Rex

  12. The Following User Says 'Aye' to ThistleDown For This Useful Post:


  13. #8
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    13,588
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ThistleDown View Post
    I see you are in the US, Katia, so you may be correct for your location. Others will have to speak to that. In the Highland tradition, however, women have worn jeweled grouse claws and little feathered brooches from Victorian times -- and many still do. It's men who don't wear that sort of thing. Lapel simply means where these things are usually worn, and just because they are marketed by tat shops today as men's wear doesn't mean they are 'traditionally' men's wear.

    Quite right, they are traditional “county” bling for ladies.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 28th November 18 at 08:56 PM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  14. #9
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    4,939
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the insight. It would make sense that the small clan crest with grouse feathers might be a ladies' lapel pin, if that's the tradition in the UK. Since the mens' clan crests would typically be larger and worn on a bonnet, I would assume this to be intended as the manner for one's accompanying spouse to also sport a clan crest. If that's the case, perhaps my wife might want to wear it.

    (I plead ignorance on these matters, as I typically do not wear much in the way of jewellery. Only a wedding band and university ring. I don't wear necklaces, wristwatches, bracelets, pins or brooches, etc.)

    As for the simple stag's head pin, I am not convinced it's a ladies' pin. This sort of design is clearly marketed to men when I search for it on the net, as exemplified below from two separate sites. But they are obviously paired with non-kilt suits. If the consensus is that this pin would be "too much" when worn with a kilt, then perhaps I'll reserve it for wearing with a suit or sport coat.


  15. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Tobus For This Useful Post:


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0