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  1. #1
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    Sporrans and Bonnets

    Hello all,

    This is the best forum this would fit into. I will be talking about accessories, specifically bonnets and sporrans. Below I posted posters of a sporran guide and a bonnet guide providing basic information to beginner kilt wearers so they understand basically what the different types are and when they are used. I made these posters myself.

    Sporrans.jpg

    Bonnets.jpg

    If you want to explain this to someone but want to do it quick, show them these.

    To be clear, I'm talking about civilians and civilian pipe bands.
    Last edited by PatrickHughes123; 7th August 18 at 12:40 PM.
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  3. #2
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    That is as good a guide as many of the retailers offer.

    As folks get further into sporrans, they may find variations of each design you illustrate. For example, some formal fur faced, metal canteled sporrans snap open at the top and fold open like a purse (instead of a back flap opening). The same with bonnets that have no dicing as an option.

    Americans like to have options in order to individualize their attire and not everyone plans to join a pipe band. This will still be a useful start for many folks.

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  5. #3
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    In homage of Bader and others 'Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools'.

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  7. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    That is as good a guide as many of the retailers offer.

    As folks get further into sporrans, they may find variations of each design you illustrate. For example, some formal fur faced, metal canteled sporrans snap open at the top and fold open like a purse (instead of a back flap opening). The same with bonnets that have no dicing as an option.

    Americans like to have options in order to individualize their attire and not everyone plans to join a pipe band. This will still be a useful start for many folks.
    Thanks, I honestly didn't think it was that good.
    Official Patrick Hughes Message

  8. #5
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    Seems like a good overview and beginners guide and a reminder I need to look for a hunting sporran the next time I'm at a shop.

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  10. #6
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    I disagree with a few things:

    1. Horsehair sporrans aren't necessarily the most formal. I would say it's more of a regimental sporran, worn with a full No. 1 Dress - tunic, plaid, and yes, as you said, feather bonnet.

    2. Glens hardly ever seen on civilians. 99% of the pipe band world wear glens as part of their uniform, and the majority are civilians. Even non-pipe band people, when they wear traditional headgear, often opt for the glen as it's easier than the balmoral.

    3. Feather bonnets only being worn by pipers. I don't know where you got that notion.

  11. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    In homage of Bader and others 'Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools'.
    IIRC actually said by Squadron Leader Day to Douglas Bader during his time in training, When I corrected a teacher about that, some 48 years ago, it didn't go down to well.. I had read the book the week before.
    "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give"
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill

  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by YOJiMBO20 View Post
    I disagree with a few things:

    1. Horsehair sporrans aren't necessarily the most formal. I would say it's more of a regimental sporran, worn with a full No. 1 Dress - tunic, plaid, and yes, as you said, feather bonnet.

    2. Glens hardly ever seen on civilians. 99% of the pipe band world wear glens as part of their uniform, and the majority are civilians. Even non-pipe band people, when they wear traditional headgear, often opt for the glen as it's easier than the balmoral.

    3. Feather bonnets only being worn by pipers. I don't know where you got that notion.
    1. I am talking about civilian kilt wearing. In the civilian world, it is the most formal sporran. It is mostly worn by pipers, but is sometimes occasionally worn by civilians at formal events, not often though.

    2. You may actually have a point there. But in my personal experience, I've never seen any kilted person displaying a Glengarry on their head.

    3. Yes, they are. When have you ever seen a non-piper person or an everyday person wearing a Feather Bonnet?
    Official Patrick Hughes Message

  13. #9
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    Word choice might be mixing your meaning a bit.

    For example, feather bonnets are not ~always~ worn by pipers. The feather bonnet is a military head dress that is ~often~ worn by pipers and drummers in civilian bands.

    Similarly, the horsehair sporran is primarily used in military highland full dress, but is also considered to be a higher level of formal sporran for civilians.

    In my estimate, the semi-dress sporran is really just a fancier day wear. I consider my sporrans in only three ways; formal, business and casual - since that is how I dress and I've found or made sporrans I think suitable to each.
    Last edited by Taskr; 8th August 18 at 10:52 AM.

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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taskr View Post
    Word choice might be mixing your meaning a bit.

    For example, feather bonnets are not ~always~ worn by pipers. The feather bonnet is a military head dress that is ~often~ worn by pipers and drummers in civilian bands.

    Similarly, the horsehair sporran is primarily used in military highland full dress, but is also considered to be a higher level of formal sporran for civilians.
    Yes, again though, the focus was on civilian kilt wearing. Okay, but when I said this, I had solo pipers in mind, my bad.
    Official Patrick Hughes Message

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