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  1. #11
    Join Date
    7th May 09
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Cool to see velvet jackets being worn nowadays!

    Do you get slippage if you're wearing the velvet Sheriffmuir and using a velvet bag-cover?

    Actually it's odd about the velvet bag-covers, I've played them for 40 years and never had a problem with them slipping.

    Then a few years ago I got a velvet bag-cover with the Dycem patches, but when I debuted it at a wedding gig I could barely play my pipes! It was the first time I had a bag constantly slipping down. I never wore that cover again.
    I've not noticed any bag slippage issues. I have noticed that it gets VERY warm in there when playing (it's wool velvet).
    'A damned ill-conditioned sort of an ape. It had a can of ale at every pot-house on the road, and is reeling drunk. "

  2. #12
    Join Date
    15th January 19
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    Lake Zurich, Illinois
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    Less than US$100 shipped for jacket and waistcoat, Pakistan shipped, wool and polyester listed as materials, ebay. But 100% positive feedback over the past year.
    Definite crapshoot with Pakistani ebay sales. I am overly cautious until someone else gives it a try.
    FYI- They also have a sherrifmuir set for about same price.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
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    Crieff, Perthshire
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    A velvet jacket can be a nice feature for evening wear but as with everything in life, one gets what one pays for. Personally I would avoid these.
    Last edited by figheadair; 19th December 19 at 04:08 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    A velvet jacket can be a nice feature for evening but with everything in life, one gets what one pays for. Personally I would avoid these.
    Sage advice there.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  5. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Jock Scot For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
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    Beijing
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pleater View Post
    A velvet bow tie is usually one of the permanently made up sort, with a band which clips together inside the back of the bow - and the band is not velvet - I have to confess to owning such a thing in a slightly over the top size, and would not consider it manly in my own social circle - but of course these things differ according to place.
    When I was a child, in the 1970s, the super-sized velvet pre-tied bow was an all too popular item of evening wear, often paired with a powder blue polyester tuxedo jacket featuring truly massive lapels and formal trousers of the same garish material (with flared legs). The ensemble would be completed with a ruffled shirt, with a gigantic collar that was thought to "balance" the double-wide lapels and clown-size tie. Prom pictures from the era memorialize this unfortunate look.

    It's just one more reason I am glad that the era of Watergate and disco is behind us.

    The black bow tie I wear on formal occasions is the same silk self-tie one I've had since my own prom in the 1980s, although it was an older item I bought at a vintage shop then.

    I like the idea of velvet jackets, especially for evening wear. I am not so sure about the matching vest and definitely skeptical of the low price for a brand-new item. It would be more believable for a pre-owned jacket, perhaps ex-hire or discovered in Grandpa's attic.

    Andrew

  7. #16
    Join Date
    13th March 05
    Location
    Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (OCONCAN)
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingandrew View Post
    When I was a child, in the 1970s, the super-sized velvet pre-tied bow was an all too popular item of evening wear, often paired with a powder blue polyester tuxedo jacket featuring truly massive lapels and formal trousers of the same garish material (with flared legs). The ensemble would be completed with a ruffled shirt, with a gigantic collar that was thought to "balance" the double-wide lapels and clown-size tie. Prom pictures from the era memorialize this unfortunate look.
    I was married in that outfit, only the colour was green! Picture patent leather dark green shoes as well!
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove."

  8. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Macman For This Useful Post:


  9. #17
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
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    Dorset, on the South coast of England
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    Persons of a sensitive disposition might wish to avoid reading this description.

    The oversized velvet bow tie was worn with a burgundy satin blouse and patent leather burgundy boots, and a green velvet suit - formerly a trouser suit but the trousers had been damaged in the shop, by someone walking past with a cigarette. I got it for very little money and made the trousers into knee length britches, added gold braid (sorry) made a cap from one of the cut off bits and wore it on stage for quite a long time.
    As the boots had platform soles and six inch heels I was almost 6ft tall.
    That would have been in the early 70s - when I had a 24 inch waist and could sit on my hair if it was loose.

    Only this last Thursday at the Morris side Christmas meet, I wore a gown of dark green crushed velvet and added crimson ribbons - and sang as well as played the music. Why break the habit of a lifetime?
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  10. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Pleater For This Useful Post:


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