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  1. #1
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    "I Keep Losing Buttons!"

    The jacket and vest I wear for solo piping gigs has epaulets and the standard silver colored, diamond shaped buttons. At each of my last two gigs, I have managed to knock off the button on the left side (drone side, naturally). I think I'm fairly careful with my pipes, so I was surprised when I discovered that I must have snagged it again after having to sew on a replacement just hours before.

    Any thoughts on a good knot or alternate thread that I could use? Should I just sew the epaulets down without a button?

  2. #2
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    6th February 17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbutts View Post
    ...Any thoughts on a good knot or alternate thread that I could use?...
    Alternate to what? Did you already use button thread or just a regular one?

  3. #3
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    7th February 11
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    Guttermann's thread is the one I see most recommended. Just keep looping your thread through over and over again and frap it when you're done before tying off.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

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  5. #4
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    22nd August 12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    Guttermann's thread is the one I see most recommended. Just keep looping your thread through over and over again and frap it when you're done before tying off.
    Definition of frap
    frapped; frapping
    transitive verb
    : to draw tight (as with ropes or cables)
    • frap a sail



    ....I had to look that one up. We normally have 5-6 spools of Coats and Clark thread in the sewing kit. It looks like Joann fabric lists Guttermann's on their website, so I'll check that out.

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  7. #5
    Join Date
    10th January 15
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    You could try linen thread which is much stronger than cotton.

  8. #6
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    4th November 16
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    I replaced the buttons on my Argyll using Coats & Clark Button & Craft thread and this method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLTgYl7xS68

    I haven't had any problems, but then again I don't play the pipes so there's nothing out of the ordinary stressing them.

    Also, I punched a small hole in the epaulet itself with my eyelet pliers (and secured the edge with simple stitching and a bit of Fray Check for good measure), so the shank of the button could pass through, and then sewed it to the jacket itself. I just thought it'd look better with the button flat against the fabric rather than floating above it. Of course, my Argyll has plain cloth epaulets, so I doubt this'll be feasible if yours are the braided variety.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    22nd August 12
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    The epaulets are cloth, so thatís a great suggestion.

    Thanks for the video link.

  10. #8
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    19th August 13
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    Simple answer

    Carpet thread. Practically indestructible, and looks like a thicker version of normal thread.
    "All the great things are simple and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honour, duty, mercy, hope." Winston Churchill

  11. #9
    Join Date
    3rd June 15
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    Same as Dollander suggested but when using general sewing thread such as Guttermann I double it and use 4 strands for all buttons -shank or eyes. The wraps around the base are very important to include to take stress off the fabric and shank.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    27th December 16
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    Colorado, USA
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    I would suggest a high strength coat & cloak nylon or silk thread as they are far stronger then most types of thread. In my experience these threads also snag on things less often, yet that won't stop the button from snagging. The lighter weight nylon thread is not always worth it though. As others have also mentioned, sew the button tight on the jacket. If the button sewn tighter to the jacket it is less likely to snag something. I often sew more stitches then needed and use 2 or 4 pieces of thread when replacing a button and have not had any issues with buttons after I have sewn them back on.

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