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  1. #1
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    20th August 17
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    Pleat maintenance

    Whatís the best way to keep the pleat on your kilt? All but one are fine on my kilt but one is losing its integrity. Would a gentle steaming help or is there something else I need to do?

  2. #2
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    7th February 11
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    To start with, what material is your kilt made of?
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

  3. #3
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    While waiting for Knoxy -

    A wool kilt requires basting to ensure the pleats remain aligned. Is there any argument against pressing individually those one or two pleats that need to be a bit sharper?

  4. #4
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    20th August 17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    To start with, what material is your kilt made of?
    Itís a sport kilt, poly-acrylic. Iím saving for a wool one though.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taskr View Post
    While waiting for Knoxy -

    A wool kilt requires basting to ensure the pleats remain aligned. Is there any argument against pressing individually those one or two pleats that need to be a bit sharper?
    Thatís interesting! I will make sure to remember that when I get my wool one! Iím sorry for the late reply. I was resting.

  6. #6
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    So...

    A lady opened up her refrigerator and there was a wabbit sitting in it. She asked "What awe you doing in my wefwidewatow?" (Decode that one!)

    The wabbit answered, "I'm westing."

    "What do you mean, you'we westing?" asked the lady

    ...and the wabbit answered, quite astonished, "Isn't this a Westinghouse?"


    And to the point: you'll find that materials other than wool do not keep their pleats as well, but there are solutions, with which, I'm sure, other members will pop up shortly.

    Bill+
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

  7. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Father Bill For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    8th September 16
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    I remember my Grandfather ironing his pleats on his kilt, and he used a wet cotton muslin cloth, placed it over the wool kilt and ironed on top of the damp cloth. Wet the cloth again went to next section. I do know this if you were in the Coast Guard or Navy, when ironing the OLD wool uniforms you would turn them inside out, and use the wet cloth method to press. Iron was on wool setting. Still have my CG Uniform, can still wear it after 45 years. No wear no tear uniform in perfect condition.

    So all that said, I bought a home steamer and I use wet steam to take out wrinkles and creases, so it seems this works fine, but I am anxious to hear about freshening the creases too. I think the wet cloth and iron would work fine, Grandfather always looked sharp.
    Allan Collin MacDonald III
    Grandfather - Clan Donald, MacDonald (Clanranald) /MacBride, Antigonish, NS, 1791
    Grandmother - Clan Chisholm of Strathglass, West River, Antigonish, 1803
    Scottish Roots: Knoidart, Inverness, Scotland, then to Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to CollinMacD For This Useful Post:


  10. #8
    Join Date
    6th April 05
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    What I have done in the past for small pleat maintenance on my 16oz wool kilt is wrap a slightly damp wash cloth around my wife's hair straightening iron, the thinner ones with 1 inch wide arms, and set it to low heat. I pull down on the pleat from the bottom corner of the pleat to keep it straight and clamp on each pleat carefully and run it down. It has worked for me pretty well!
    Last edited by Manu; 10th July 18 at 11:34 AM.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    28th May 13
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    I have a hand steamer which does a great job of getting wrinkles out of pleats. I have also laid my kilt on the floor of hotel rooms and used the steam iron to remove the wrinkles. Do it from the inside first.
    "Good judgement comes from experience, and experience
    well, that comes from poor judgement."
    A. A. Milne

  12. #10
    Join Date
    27th June 18
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    I lay my poly viscous and wool kilts out and let them rest first by laying it flat airing it out in the inside. Then I lay it out on the apron side and let it rest with a book to get it into shape.

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