X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21
    Join Date
    13th June 07
    Location
    Hoschton, GA
    Posts
    522
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Iron vs Press

    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    Please "press" - do not "iron". It leaves a shine on many materials.
    Just to be clear; what is the difference between ironing and pressing? The damp cloth?
    Thanks.
    "I'm not crazy about reality, but it's still the only place to get a decent meal."
    Grouch Marx

  2. #22
    Join Date
    7th February 11
    Location
    London, Canada
    Posts
    8,317
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kiltedsawyer View Post
    Just to be clear; what is the difference between ironing and pressing? The damp cloth?
    Thanks.
    The damp cloth for sure, AND ESPECIALLY, don't run the iron back and forth. Just squeeze it down in succession along the pleat.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

  3. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Father Bill For This Useful Post:


  4. #23
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48° 25' 47.31"N 123° 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,825
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ironing and pressing are two different techniques. Both use a heated plate to soften fibers which releases wrinkles from fabric and to set creases.

    But where they differ is the fabric they are used on.

    Dimensionally stable fabrics like cotton can have the plate moved over the surface and in some cases the friction between the plate and the fabric can pull wrinkles from the heated fibers. (Cotton actually gets better and stronger each time you iron it.)

    Pressing is used when the friction over softened fibers could distort the shape of the fabric.

    On wool fabrics we use steam to heat the fibers and not the hot sole plate of the iron. In fact you can use steam without putting the sole plate in direct contct with the fibers at all. You can shoot steam through the fabric and press with a wood block. The block can act to suck the heat back out of the fabric setting the crease.

    A standard household iron uses a very hot sole plate to create the steam. Industrial irons create the steam in a seprate tank. The sole plate of the iron can be cooler so that the fibers are not heated too much, scorching the fibers causing the sheen.

    (if you see the sheen, this is actually damage to the surface of the fabric and in some cases is permanent and weakens the fabic shortening its life.)

    So, on delicate wool, we do not move the iron over the fabric. We use steam to soften the fibers and then press.

    A pressing cloth does not actually protect the surface as much as create the steam. We dampen the pressing cloth and the heat of the sole plate turns that water to steam.

    The thing to remember is that wool must get hot to soften the fibers but the temerature needed to set a crease is also the same temperature where the softened fibers are become very delicate and can distort very easily.

    The temperature where wool softens happens to be about the same as live steam. But where a household iron can damage wool is due to the sole plate needing to be much higher to create the steam.

    The cost of home, tank style irons, (sometimes called pressing systems) has really come down in the last 20 years. Today you can get one for about the same price as a high end regular iron. I would probably not get one just to press one kilt but would really suggest that you investigate one the next time you need to replace an iron.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 16th July 18 at 10:59 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  5. The Following 6 Users say 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  6. #24
    Join Date
    20th August 17
    Location
    Boston, ma
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    Please "press" - do not "iron". It leaves a shine on many materials.
    Okay, I will find how to press it Thanks!

  7. #25
    Join Date
    20th August 17
    Location
    Boston, ma
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CollinMacD View Post
    Iron or press if you go directly on wool it will steam the knap off and create a shiny cloth material. When you steam wool directly this changes the wool into a material called broadcloth. This is a shiner non fuzzy more of a cloth or very tight weave material. If you notice most military jackets from the 19th century and later, looked more like a cloth or jean material in photos. Although wool, this wool material was usually a 10 ounce wool, that was steamed and pressed when manufactured at the mill, specifically to make broadcloth. It was done because material repels rain, smooders does not catch fire directly, and when worn lasts longer with no pilling or threat rot. Basically the wool is heated and compressed from normal wool fiber to make a smooth and tighter cloth.

    As I stated to keep wool "fuzzy" or the nap use a wet cloth over the wool and press or iron, but DO NOT GO OVER THE WET CLOTH, make sure the cloth is wet, no dripping, wring out the cloth so its damp, BUT NEVER iron wool directly on the face out side.
    Okay, I will. Its polyacrylic though... should I press with a white cloth?

  8. #26
    Join Date
    20th August 17
    Location
    Boston, ma
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Baeau View Post
    I'm probably wrong, about this. Just ask my wife & daughters, they will agree. Sometime, not far back, there was a thread that discussed pressing of pleats. The Wizard of BC offered some technical information regarding the materials used in non-wool kilts, & a correct / suggested method of pressing.
    I will check out The Wizard of BC. Is the person on here or is it a website? If it's a website, would you be able to personally message me the link?

  9. #27
    Join Date
    20th August 17
    Location
    Boston, ma
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    The damp cloth for sure, AND ESPECIALLY, don't run the iron back and forth. Just squeeze it down in succession along the pleat.
    I will do that, thanks so much!!!

  10. #28
    Join Date
    20th August 17
    Location
    Boston, ma
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    Ironing and pressing are two different techniques. Both use a heated plate to soften fibers which releases wrinkles from fabric and to set creases.

    But where they differ is the fabric they are used on.

    Dimensionally stable fabrics like cotton can have the plate moved over the surface and in some cases the friction between the plate and the fabric can pull wrinkles from the heated fibers. (Cotton actually gets better and stronger each time you iron it.)

    Pressing is used when the friction over softened fibers could distort the shape of the fabric.

    On wool fabrics we use steam to heat the fibers and not the hot sole plate of the iron. In fact you can use steam without putting the sole plate in direct contct with the fibers at all. You can shoot steam through the fabric and press with a wood block. The block can act to suck the heat back out of the fabric setting the crease.

    A standard household iron uses a very hot sole plate to create the steam. Industrial irons create the steam in a seprate tank. The sole plate of the iron can be cooler so that the fibers are not heated too much, scorching the fibers causing the sheen.

    (if you see the sheen, this is actually damage to the surface of the fabric and in some cases is permanent and weakens the fabic shortening its life.)

    So, on delicate wool, we do not move the iron over the fabric. We use steam to soften the fibers and then press.

    A pressing cloth does not actually protect the surface as much as create the steam. We dampen the pressing cloth and the heat of the sole plate turns that water to steam.

    The thing to remember is that wool must get hot to soften the fibers but the temerature needed to set a crease is also the same temperature where the softened fibers are become very delicate and can distort very easily.

    The temperature where wool softens happens to be about the same as live steam. But where a household iron can damage wool is due to the sole plate needing to be much higher to create the steam.

    The cost of home, tank style irons, (sometimes called pressing systems) has really come down in the last 20 years. Today you can get one for about the same price as a high end regular iron. I would probably not get one just to press one kilt but would really suggest that you investigate one the next time you need to replace an iron.
    I will definitely look into a tank style iron to fix my kilt. Thanks so much!!

  11. #29
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
    Posts
    5,192
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When caring for items made from acrylic fibers - Please, please remember that these are a special and unique types of fabrics.

    You do not press acrylic. You iron with a very light pressure. You keep the iron moving at all times.

    You use the very lowest setting on your iron. No more than 275 F.

    You do not use steam.

    Caution is a must as the result of too high a temp or keeping the hot sole plate in one place too long will be a molten blob of plastic.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  12. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  13. #30
    Join Date
    8th February 18
    Location
    Near the Summit, above Silicon Valley
    Posts
    422
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    When caring for items made from acrylic fibers - Please, please remember that these are a special and unique types of fabrics.

    You do not press acrylic. You iron with a very light pressure. You keep the iron moving at all times.

    You use the very lowest setting on your iron. No more than 275 F.

    You do not use steam.

    Caution is a must as the result of too high a temp or keeping the hot sole plate in one place too long will be a molten blob of plastic.
    Steve.........another question regarding the acrylic fibre care information. My kilt is made from a 55/45 blend of polyester & wool, from one of the Forum's partners. Should it ever need touch up, follow your instructions? Or, is there any suggested / required addition(s) to them? TA!
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0