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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    There is a really quick and easy check that you can do.

    It is called the stretch test.

    Begin at the back. Grab the two buckles and pull them apart. It does not need much force, only about 3-4 lbs of pull. Watch across the back of the kilt, at the pleats. You should not see any give or stretch between the buckles. Absolutely none.

    Here is a kilt that fails the stretch test in a rather dramatic way. Can you see that the kilt has stretched, the fabric distorted and the stitches are under stress?
    And this is only about 2 lbs. of pull.



    The most common cause of failing the back stretch test is that the stabilizer has been left out, the buckle tabs have not been anchored to the stabilizer or the stitching of the stabilizer and/or interfacing is too loose.

    Then do the same thing with both aprons. Grab a strap and a buckle and pull. Again, there should be no stretch, none, nada. The apron edge where the strap is sewn on should not distort and no puckering should appear across the middle of the aprons. Check to see if the strap hole shows any hint of distortion.

    Any stretch or distortion in the aprons is usually caused by the pieces of the interfacing not being sewn together into one integral unit or the strap has not been sewn all the way through, or the stitching is too loose. The kilt in this photo is brand new and you can see that there is no pull on this strap at all. The distortion is quite evident



    In this kilt, while there is a liner and there is interfacing - and this kilt was sold as a premium quality, hand stitched Traditional kilt - they are present in name only.



    If your kilt fails the stretch test it may be a good idea to take the liner out and install a stabilizer and check that the interfacing and buckle tab and strap stitching is nice and secure.

    You would only be out a day, maybe a day and half's worth of work to make the kilt right.

    The stretch test checks in the horizontal direction. This tests the stabilizer.

    To check if the interfacing is doing what it is supposed to do try to stand the kilt up all by itself.
    The kilt in the front has failed. The kilt in the back passes.



    But after a re-build the kilt passes with flying colors.


    That was a bit scary, but it passed the pull side of the test. And I wasn't too gentle, according to the gauge I put 2 kilo of pull between the buckles, between buckle and it's own and opposing strap. I couldn't attack the gauge to the straps as the hook is too big, si I stood on one while I pull the other. Passed
    And it stands under its own weight
    IMG-20200402-111511639.jpg

    Other side
    IMG-20200402-111527958.jpg

    Bottonhole tartan side
    IMG-20200402-112953647.jpg

    Buttonhole lining side (you can just see the tab stitching)
    IMG-20200402-113029042.jpg

    Pulling the apron strap
    IMG-20200402-113153059.jpg

    I think I might have dodged the bullet on this one, but I'll still pull the lining in a couple of weeks and check the kilt thoroughly.
    Thanks for all of your advice and tips, I'll never be a professional as stitching hurts my hands, but I might make a half decent amateur.
    Proud member of the MacDonalds of Clanranald.

  2. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to kilted Mnementh For This Useful Post:


  3. #12
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    In kilt making the difference between an amateur and a professional - is that the professional has ripped out and restitched more pleats.

    It is a gradual progression from "that's good enough" through "picky" until you arrive at "full blown obsessive".

    The definition of a Master Kiltmaker is someone who is so far gone that mothers will gather their children closer to their side when around them. When strangers on the street begin to comment - "Don't stand too close to that person, I hear that you can catch something from them."

    You can tell you have reached this level when walking into a fabric store and none of the staff will make eye contact and you notice them ducking behind the counter.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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  5. #13
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    Stoff is offline Oops, it seems this member needs to update their email address
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    In kilt making the difference between an amateur and a professional - is that the professional has ripped out and restitched more pleats.

    It is a gradual progression from "that's good enough" through "picky" until you arrive at "full blown obsessive".

    The definition of a Master Kiltmaker is someone who is so far gone that mothers will gather their children closer to their side when around them. When strangers on the street begin to comment - "Don't stand too close to that person, I hear that you can catch something from them."

    You can tell you have reached this level when walking into a fabric store and none of the staff will make eye contact and you notice them ducking behind the counter.
    I understand completely. As a historic tailor, I have seen this same reaction. You should see the reaction when you walk in ask the staff where to find the horse hair canvas. They frequently look at you as if you have a minimum of two heads with another sprouting. That or just look puzzled due to the fact that they do not have a clue as to what you are talking about.

    Stoff

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  7. #14
    Join Date
    23rd August 19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    There is a really quick and easy check that you can do.

    It is called the stretch test.

    Any stretch or distortion in the aprons is usually caused by the pieces of the interfacing not being sewn together into one integral unit or the strap has not been sewn all the way through, or the stitching is too loose. The kilt in this photo is brand new and you can see that there is no pull on this strap at all. The distortion is quite evident



    In this kilt, while there is a liner and there is interfacing - and this kilt was sold as a premium quality, hand stitched Traditional kilt - they are present in name only.
    Aye, just had cause to check a custom kilt made by a "professional" which I've worn just 3 times since purchase as I kept it for best. (My own attempts didn't seem such high quality, and are very much stiffer around the waist so I thought I had done something wrong when I compared to the kilt I had paid quite a bit for at the website of a kilt store i)n Scotland .

    In both aprons the interface is 3 inch deep and they are NOT attached to the 3 inch deep piece that runs from buckle to buttonhole. IMG-20200409-211317606.jpg
    Now I understand why that kilt feels looser even though I have gained an inch around the waist since buying it. Also it cannot keep itself upright.
    IMG-20200409-211258679.jpg

    Looks like I need to un stitch the lining and make repairs to it. Had I not received your advice and tips, I would have ruined the kilt by wearing it. so once again, Thank You to The Wizard of BC
    Last edited by kilted Mnementh; 9th April 20 at 05:36 PM.
    Proud member of the MacDonalds of Clanranald.

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