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  1. #1
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    best way to join center rear

    Sometimes the kilt needs a very long piece so is useful to cut the fabric in width and join the parts in length.

    In the tutorials the way to do it is to sew the parts with the "good" sides touching, finish the flaps to avoid raveling and sew one flap each side.
    I've found a zigzag in not enough to avoid fraying and my sewing machine has no overlock stitch so I prefer to hide the borders as shown in the image.

    2.jpg

    Then I started looking at commercial made clothes and I found two kinds on joints.

    1.jpg

    This one. Hiding each border inside the other one. Not as symmetrical as the first one. but used in most heavy duty jeans parts.

    3.jpg

    And this one, leaving the flap flapping (eventually stoped and the end by the hem). Again, overlock stitch is needed to do this well.


    Which seems better, 1st or 2nd?(I cannot do 3rd without overlock)

  2. #2
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    5th August 14
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    I hit the button twice (a common error for many of us) and do not need to duplicate this post.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 23rd February 19 at 07:23 AM.

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  4. #3
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    I looked at your other post (about cold weather and denim kilt). Are these sewing examples for denim? If you use denim, the lap joint works but leaves a bulge where the seam meets and usually the stitching is obvious. I recommend the first example but understand the limitation of your sewing machine.

    The last example will be less obvious (but still visible) to the outside of the garment but is not the strongest stitching solution (even if you sew the "flap" to one side of the adjoining fabric.

    I hope our members that have more experience will submit comments to lead you better than my simple view.

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  6. #4
    Join Date
    21st January 19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I looked at your other post (about cold weather and denim kilt). Are these sewing examples for denim? If you use denim, the lap joint works but leaves a bulge where the seam meets and usually the stitching is obvious.
    Where the stiching is obvious I don't try to hide hit. I prefer a very contrasting and strong thread and I do a very visible (and hopefully neat) stitch. Making the stitches part of the decoration.

  7. #5
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    I did not understand until your last post. If you are going to use that seam as decoration and strength it will be good. Have you tried other fabrics?

    Other members have used cloth from thrift stores to practice on before they made their kilts. There may be other fabrics that appeal to you for another kilt.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    Perhaps a photo of an actual fabric join will help.

    If you are hand stitching - This is called a "Flat Fell Seam".





    If you are machine stitching your kilt - This is called a "Sailmakers Seam".

    [



    Please notice that both of these produce a seam where there are no raw edges of fabric to fray. A serger is not used to finish the edges they are folded in or stitched over depending on you method of stitching.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 23rd February 19 at 12:45 PM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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  10. #7
    Join Date
    28th July 18
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    I don't know what it is called but the third one can be sewn and then the leftover fabric is folded toward the backside of the sewn item and stitched twice for strength. This leaves a double row of stitching that shows on the outside of the sewn item.
    Last edited by pofloyd1; 23rd February 19 at 12:27 PM.

  11. #8
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    I have access to tape and ribbon and have used a simple seam, pressed the allowance open from the inside and then sewn a ribbon onto the inside, wide enough to cover the raw edges.
    The ribbon was sewn on each side of the join, quite close, from the outside and then from the inside at the edge of the ribbon.
    As long as the thread is well matched I have a wide selection of colours, and is not pulled tight or running loose, the join is not very obvious at all. I did a few by hand at first, and then used the sewing machine when in a hurry, and never did another by hand.

    My sewing machine and I are, however, very old acquaintances so a bit of practice might be required to get the result just right if yours is a recent acquisition.
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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  13. #9
    Join Date
    21st January 19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pleater View Post
    I have access to tape and ribbon and have used a simple seam, pressed the allowance open from the inside and then sewn a ribbon onto the inside, wide enough to cover the raw edges.
    The ribbon was sewn on each side of the join, quite close, from the outside and then from the inside at the edge of the ribbon.
    As long as the thread is well matched I have a wide selection of colours, and is not pulled tight or running loose, the join is not very obvious at all. I did a few by hand at first, and then used the sewing machine when in a hurry, and never did another by hand.

    My sewing machine and I are, however, very old acquaintances so a bit of practice might be required to get the result just right if yours is a recent acquisition.
    Like the idea. Any photos?

  14. #10
    Join Date
    5th August 14
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    I used a product similar to Anne's (Pleater) description. Here is a photo of the type I have used.

    The tape is paper with adhesive but not as thick as masking tape. I had to use a stronger needle on my sewing machine and sew at a slower speed.

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