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  1. #1
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    Kilt Lining Material?

    Hello.
    I am currently making a kilt for the first time. I'm getting ready to start the lining. Every Kilt I've seen has had a nylon lining. I'm not a fan of nylon, especially in hot weather. I was thinking some sort of cotton, like t-shirt material or something similar. Anyone ever try that? What is your experiences with that? And what are the pros and cons of either fabric. And/or what fabric do you recommend? Please help me out, it'd be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you

    -Derek Carbaugh

  2. #2
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    7th September 14
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    Nylon does not sound very comfortable at all. I'd think its whatever works for you since the lining shouldn't be taking any strain. My kilts have a plain poly/cotton blend lining. Some will line a kilt with a print that reflects the owner - things like super heroes or trucks. I think you can find a US flag motif in threads here.

  3. #3
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    21st October 08
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    sterling, ny
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    I bought a material similar to a good set of cotton sheets, feels comfortable and not too hot.

  4. #4
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    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    Are you making a traditionally made kilt? The liner is only to cover up the internal construction elements built into a traditionally made kilt. A Traditionally made kilt will have the excess fabric in the Fell area cut away to keep the back thin. Then a stabilizer is added to take up the horizontal stress of strapping the kilt on. Then floating interfacing is added to give vertical shape to the kilt allowing the pleats to swish properly.

    If you are making something other than a kilt with the internal construction elements, there is no reason to put a liner in the kilt at all. The only reason you see the nylon liners is because traditionally made kilts have a liner so some put a liner in to make you believe you are buying a traditionally made kilt. Some are not even fastened except at the waistbanding and bunch up terribly.

    I have had people try to tell me that the liner is to keep the kilt clean. Well, if that were true the liner would be removable and washable.
    I have had people try to tell me that the liner is to reduce friction like the liner in a suit jacket. Well, if you look close the slippery fabric is used in the sleeves so your arm can slide into the sleeve easily. In truth slippery fabrics in a kilt cause the back of the kilt to ride up and bunch into what we call "Pillow butt".

    The liner of a traditionally made kilt can be made from almost anything. Older kilts will use a cream colored heavy fabric and I have seen linen used in some older kilts. More modern kilts will use a cotton fabric about the same as sheets and pillowcases. I like cotton quilting fabrics.
    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 29th August 17 at 01:44 PM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    29th September 16
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    Are you making a traditionally made kilt? The liner is only to cover up the internal construction elements built into a traditionally made kilt. A Traditionally made kilt will have the excess fabric in the Fell area cut away to keep the back thin. Then a stabilizer is added to take up the horizontal stress of strapping the kilt on. Then floating interfacing is added to give vertical shape to the kilt allowing the pleats to swish properly.

    If you are making something other than a kilt with the internal construction elements, there is no reason to put a liner in the kilt at all. The only reason you see the nylon liners is because traditionally made kilts have a liner so some put a liner in to make you believe you are buying a traditionally made kilt. Some are not even fastened except at the waistbanding and bunch up terribly.

    I have had people try to tell me that the liner is to keep the kilt clean. Well, if that were true the liner would be removable and washable.
    I have had people try to tell me that the liner is to reduce friction like the liner in a suit jacket. Well, if you look close the slippery fabric is used in the sleeves so your arm can slide into the sleeve easily. In truth slippery fabrics in a kilt cause the back of the kilt to ride up and bunch into what we call "Pillow butt".

    The liner of a traditionally made kilt can be made from almost anything. Older kilts will use a cream colored heavy fabric and I have seen linen used in some older kilts. More modern kilts will use a cotton fabric about the same as sheets and pillowcases. I like cotton quilting fabrics.
    Yes, I was going for a traditional style kilt. I was debating putting a stabilizers in, but wasn't sure if they were necessary or just extra work. What do most people use for stabilizers? Heavy canvas?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    5th August 14
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    If, like Taskr stated, a heavier linen of durable cotton is used as a stabilizer the kilt would be held in place as needed and a breathable factor would occur. Nix on nylon or synthetic fabrics for a kilt for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    "The Art of Kiltmaking" says to use broadcloth. The idea is that there should not be too much bulk but the stabilizer must not have any stretch. None, nada,
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  8. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  9. #8
    Join Date
    29th September 16
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    What would it look like if I didn't cut the pleats in the fell? I have a 4 yard kilt that kept the material in there, but it is low yardage so there isn't a lot of bulk. The kilt I'm currently making is 7 yards with 9" deep pleats (9" pleat edge to pleat edge) so the bulk adds up quick. Will it look fine if I leave the extra material in the fell, or will it look like I'm smuggling pillows in my butt?

  10. #9
    Join Date
    7th September 14
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    One method might be to wrap the uncut pleats around you as if wearing a finished kilt. Is the look what you want.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    29th September 16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taskr View Post
    One method might be to wrap the uncut pleats around you as if wearing a finished kilt. Is the look what you want.
    It wasn't bad. Would be comfy with all the padding that's for sure.

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