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  1. #1
    Join Date
    18th July 07
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    Brighde 's Steaphanaidh Chaimbeul

    I thought you might like to hear of the very musical Campbell girls from Skye - native Gaelic speakers, of course. Here we meet Brighde on cauld wind pipes and Steaphanaidh. (who usually plays harp)
    Their set starts at 18:46
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episod...es-3-episode-3
    If you can't get bbc iplayer you could go to Brighde Chaimbeul's public facebook page and get some of it there with some further sets especially "Dolina Mackay".. Brighde is also brilliant on the great Highland pipe.
    (Sister Mairi is over in the US
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDvWaTl8ULo
    )

    For the Gaelic fans, notice how Caimbeul becomes lenited because they are fremale.

    Alan
    Last edited by neloon; 15th October 17 at 11:09 AM.

  2. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to neloon For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    9th July 15
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    Banks of the Black Warrior River USA
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    Only very recently discovered her on YouTube, and love watching her play.
    My introduction was this video:

    https://youtu.be/M_7u10kDsHY

    If I have absorbed correctly - and I understand lenition in Scottish Gaelic is not a simple characterization - feminine parts of speech, or parts of speech describing a feminine subject, that begin with non-lenited consonants are preceded by the feminine "a" ? I think? As in 'nighean' or 'latha'
    "We are all connected...to each other, biologically; to the earth, chemically; to the universe, atomically...and that makes me smile." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

  4. #3
    Join Date
    18th July 07
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    Oh dear! I wish I hadn't added that last sentence because I've opened a can of worms.
    As I don't quite understand your question, I going to bamboozle everybody further by referring you to Wikipedia.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic_name
    Now Campbell is not a patronymic form but an adjectival (it means "twisted mouth" just as Cameron means "twisted nose") and so, as the article says, " when used in the female form the first letter is aspirated (if possible)"
    Sometimes a patronymic form is used in Gaelic which is quite different from the "English" form - notice how, in the BBC Alba programme, Mary Anne Kennedy is called Mairi Anna NicUalraig i.e. daughter of Ulrik
    Now, if you really want to torture yourself, have ago at this.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotti...n_and_spelling
    So, when you're addressing somebody in Gaelic (vocative case) the initial letter will be lenited (aspirated) where it makes sense. Seumas (James) becomes Sheumais (pronounced "Hamish" which is how that name arose). Notice how Mairi Anna addresses our heroines as "Bhrighde agus Steaphanaidh" - Brighde (Bridget) is easily lenited but "S" is not lenited before "t". Most non-Gaelic names are left as is anyway e.g. "Sophie" would not normally be lenited.
    I think I've said quite enough.
    Ailean (Alan)
    Last edited by neloon; 16th October 17 at 03:20 AM.

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