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  1. #21
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    Thank you OCR.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  2. #22
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    Much appreciated, Richard. A clear demonstration.

    It was done with extreme, dressy respect and class, but it's not my personal cup of tea, nor, I imagine, would it have been acceptable in decades past but then, things do evolve indeed. My personal preference is still the British "palm-out" salute, but that's a matter of heritage and being an auld crabbit I suppose.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

  3. #23
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    27th September 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    I've seen both. Usually people with US military, police, or fire service do the American style, while people brought up in the pipe band world do the British style.

    The modern US military salute, by the way, seems to have evolved into something different from what US military people did a couple generations ago. I see it all the time when I'm piping at funerals where there's a current US military Honor Guard.

    The elbow is held low to the side. Here it is

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhXkP2emFII
    The video is good, but it's for ceremonial purposes. The salute in the video is done slowly as it is a funeral. The usual salute is done quickly with a snap to it. The arm should be up higher than in the video so that the upper arm is horizontal.

    Below is an extract from the Army Manual:

    FM 3-21.5 Drill and Ceremonies

    4-4. HAND SALUTE
    The Hand Salute is a one-count movement. The command is Present, ARMS. The Hand
    Salute may be executed while marching. When marching, only the soldier in charge of
    the formation salutes and acknowledges salutes. When double-timing, an individual
    soldier must come to Quick Time before saluting.
    a. When wearing headgear with a visor (with or without glasses), on the command
    of execution ARMS, raise the right hand sharply, fingers and thumb extended and joined,
    palm facing down, and place the tip of the right forefinger on the rim of the visor slightly
    to the right of the right eye. The outer edge of the hand is barely canted downward so that
    neither the back of the hand nor the palm is clearly visible from the front. The hand and
    wrist are straight, the elbow inclined slightly forward, and the upper arm horizontal (1,
    Figure 4-5).
    b. When wearing headgear without a visor (or uncovered) and not wearing glasses,
    execute the Hand Salute in the same manner as previously described, except touch the tip
    of the right forefinger to the forehead near and slightly to the right of the right eyebrow
    (2, Figure 4-5).
    c. When wearing headgear without a visor (or uncovered) and wearing glasses,
    execute the Hand Salute in the same manner as previously described, except touch the tip
    of the right forefinger to that point on the glasses where the temple piece of the frame
    meets the right edge of the right brow (3, Figure 4-5).
    d. Order Arms from the Hand Salute is a one-count movement. The command is
    Order, ARMS. On the command of execution ARMS, return the hand sharply to the
    side, resuming the Position of Attention.
    e. When reporting or rendering courtesy to an individual, turn the head and eyes
    toward the person addressed and simultaneously salute. In this situation, the actions are
    executed without command. The Salute is initiated by the subordinate at the appropriate
    time (six paces) and terminated upon acknowledgment. (See Appendix A for more
    information on saluting.)

    Below is a photo from the manual of how a salute should look. As it happens, I know the guy on the right end. I was stationed with him in Alaska.

    Last edited by Arnot; 26th August 15 at 06:32 AM.

  4. #24
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    Interesting discussion gents, that video was well done and very smart. Although to my eye the slow movements and not bending the leg looks strange, differences in different services I presume.

    If anyone has any interest I can post my regulations for salutes including pictures from the Drill manual.
    The hielan' man he wears the kilt, even when it's snowin';
    He kens na where the wind comes frae,
    But he kens fine where its goin'.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    27th September 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan View Post
    Interesting discussion gents, that video was well done and very smart. Although to my eye the slow movements and not bending the leg looks strange, differences in different services I presume.

    If anyone has any interest I can post my regulations for salutes including pictures from the Drill manual.
    The slow movements are for funerals and such. I have done many funerals and all the salutes during the ceremony were slow like that. Salutes are usually done quickly and crisply. The usual manner is described in the extract in my last post.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arnot View Post
    The slow movements are for funerals and such. Salutes are usually done quickly and crisply. The usual manner is described in the extract in my last post.
    Agreed.

    The best I could find on short notice... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWk5rUhFvSA
    Tulach Ard

  7. #27
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    27th September 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacKenzie View Post
    Agreed.

    The best I could find on short notice... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWk5rUhFvSA
    That's a pretty good video. Well done. Strangely enough, I know a couple of guys from the still shots. At about 1:33, I know the two guys on the left in flight suits.

  8. #28
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    23rd August 15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacKenzie View Post
    Agreed.

    The best I could find on short notice... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWk5rUhFvSA
    Note that about 3:02 the OP's questions is addressed directly. When in a formation, the leader salutes but not the members of the group.

  9. #29
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    22nd September 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arnot View Post
    The slow movements are for funerals and such. I have done many funerals and all the salutes during the ceremony were slow like that. Salutes are usually done quickly and crisply. The usual manner is described in the extract in my last post.

    Indeed, however I believe over here that we still do all movements at our own correct timings for funerals.
    The hielan' man he wears the kilt, even when it's snowin';
    He kens na where the wind comes frae,
    But he kens fine where its goin'.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    5th January 14
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    The reason the elbow is kept lower when using the honor guard salute is to prevent the tuck in the blouse from being pulled out of the belt.

    I served two years in the USCG Honor Guard, and that is how Military District of Washington conducted all ceremonial functions.
    "Life's too short to hunt with an ugly gun"
    U.S. Coast Guard, retired
    Clan MacKenzie

  11. The Following User Says 'Aye' to 416 Rigby For This Useful Post:


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