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Thread: One half-inch

  1. #1
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    One half-inch

    Well fellas, yesterday I took delivery of my first kilt.

    Tartan from Lochcarron, kilt assembled in Edinburgh to my specific measurements. The kilt has met my every expectation and seems more substantial than what is deemed by the maker as a 'casual kilt'. I love the hues of the tartan and the sett size is perfect.

    My wife took my measurements and she estimated my waist (above the navel) at 38 inches. When I submitted my measurements to the maker I entered 37.5" for my waist.
    When I tried my kilt on yesterday, I sinched it up to the last hole of each strap (tightest fit) and, while the garment stays on me, I can easily sweep my thumbs between my kilt and my belly. I fear that if I had submitted a 38" measurement, the kilt wouldn't stay on me.

    So, I would feel a little more confident walking around in my kilt knowing that it was going to stay where I put it. Do I just get a belt and be done with it? Is there a trick to making a kilt just a touch tighter? Would it be worth finding a local tailor to make a permanent adjustment(considering I could lose more weight)?

    What say you?

  2. #2
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    I dare say that if you are properly equipped with a backside, it shouldn't fall off. Hop, skip and jump around...if it falls off, you have a problem, otherwise, you're good to go.

    I have another solution which involves imbibing beer at regular intervals for a couple of months...!

  3. The Following 4 Users say 'Aye' to Alisdair For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alisdair View Post

    I have another solution which involves imbibing beer at regular intervals for a couple of months...!
    I like where this is going!

  5. #4
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    Alisdair has given sage advice followed by many a kilt wearer. For those of us that shrink and swell peroidicly (and do not drink anymore) I recommend dessert in moderate but continuous portions.

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  7. #5
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    Alternately you can consult with a kiltmaker or competent tailor.

    It is far easier to make a kilt smaller than to make one larger by moving the straps and buckles.

    But, and this is very important. The straps and buckles are NOT sewn to the outer Tartan fabric!
    They are actually sewn to a strip of fabric inside the kilt and hidden from view by the liner you can see on the inside.

    The stitching just goes through the outer Tartan to get to the strip.
    This strip of fabric is called the stabilizer.

    When you take the kilt to the shop explain to the tailor that the process is the remove the buckles on the right hip and the strap on the left hip.

    Put the kilt on and chalk mark the strap and buckles new location.

    Then stitch the one or two right buckle tabs and left strap at the new location insuring that the stitching goes fully through the outer fabric and is anchored to the hidden stabilizer strip.

    Viola! you may now wear you kilt until such time that it takes for the beer or desert diet program takes effect.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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  9. #6
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    Steve, thank you so much for taking the time to answer. This is very valuable information

  10. #7
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    If it will help to understand all of this stuff, and to give you a little insight into what is hidden under the liner of a kilt that most people don't even know is there, may I suggest you take a look at a thread begun by one of our members who got a kilt which seemed to 'give' and get larger as he would wear it.

    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/s...ad.php?t=70205

    The title of this thread is "Do kilts have a break-in period?"

    I responded to his inquiry with some hints and tips to tell the condition and quality of his kilt and then he sent it to me where I took it apart for him. The photos in this thread show the inside construction details of a kilt and show how important it is for the straps and buckles to be anchored to the stabilizer.

    I hope it helps.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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  12. #8
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    Another solution (temporary) is to use suspenders.
    "Good judgement comes from experience, and experience
    well, that comes from poor judgement."
    A. A. Milne

  13. #9
    Join Date
    21st May 19
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    Well, fellas, humbly I submit my first photo in my first kilt.

    My son took the photo above my eye line so it's difficult to see where the kilt falls at my knee but I think the length is ideal. Also, the photo might suggest a kilt more rich in hue than as it actually appears. The Loachcarron Cameron modern is more muted than the same tartan from other weavers, which is what made me choose Lochcarron. You'll note that my [empty] sporran is 'pushing in' on the kilt. Perhaps this is a downside to a lightweight material more suitable to Texas summers. Is my sporran too low?

    The strange look to my shirt is the result of me folding it under so that it wouldn't hang over my sporran.
    kilt July 19.jpg
    Last edited by Cameron of Texas; 7th July 19 at 07:36 AM.

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  15. #10
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    Your photo prompts me to ask a question.

    When you measured for this kilt - did you specifically ask for the bottom of the kilt to fall so far below your knees?

    The reason I ask is that it is quite common for people to measure for a kilt and not understand one of the basic design features of the kilt.

    When the design of the kilt was established, men's trousers were worn much higher than they are worn today.
    The kilt is one of the few garments today that retains this older styling.

    The top strap is designed to be worn cinched into the anatomical waist. This is up, just below the ribs. The top band of the kilt will actually be higher yet going up, over the bottom of the ribs.

    All the rest of the kilt is designed around this high waist. For example - in the back, there is the portion of the kilt that is tapered and sewn down. This area is called "the Fell". The bottom of the Fell is designed to end right at the crest of the buttocks and hips with the waist worn higher.

    If you put the kilt on with the waist lower than it was designed to be worn, the bottom of the Fell will not fall in the right place to look good in the back.

    Will you do an experiment for me please.

    Reach back to your butt and slide your finger up one of the pleats to where the sewn-down portion ends. Is you finger at the crest of the buttocks? This just happens to be right about the same level as the hip joint so that is a good second reference.

    Where the bottom of the Fell falls , and where the bottom edge of the kilt hits the knee is actually more important than the waist height.

    The kilt is one of the only garments where the wearer must change their expectations and conform to the design of the garment.

    Kilt measuring instructions seldom address the because it is just assumed that you are measuring the waist, up high, where the design of the garment dictates it should be.

    When the bottom of the Fell and the bottom of the kilt are based on a high waist - if you try to wear the waist where you usually wear trousers - the garment will look odd or develop unsightly puckers and ripples.

    The sporran will also not fit well and look like it does in other photos. So this may be why the sporran seems too low.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 7th July 19 at 09:24 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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