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  1. #1
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    Adding a cockade to hand-knitted Balmoral

    I acquired this lovely blue Balmoral several years ago from a fellow X-Marker (Aspiringloser). He hand-knitted and felted it, and it has a very nice thickness and weight to it that's lacking in modern commercially-made Balmorals. The shape and size are perfect on my noggin. It has been on a hat stand next to my other Balmorals, but like many other projects of mine, I hadn't gotten around to completing it. I'd like to put the finishing touches on it and wear it.

    Over the weekend, I removed the toorie and trimmed it down in size to my liking, then stitched it back on. What I need to do next is put a cockade on it to mount a clan badge.

    As you can see, it's a classic Scots blue colour with grey toorie and black/grey/blue dicing. I think a standard black cockade will suit it well. Not a fancy rosette, and not white (my clan were not Jacobite supporters). I'd just like a plain black ribbon cockade similar to the ones seen on modern Balmorals.



    I've searched the forum as best I could for examples on making one, but I only seem to find threads about making rosettes and cross-shaped styles. For reference, I want to make a cockade similar to this one:



    That one, as well as the one on my Mackie Balmoral, seem to be built the same. They are just 3 inch wide ribbon, stitched to the bonnet, with a front layer of the same width ribbon that appears to be gathered at the middle. Neither of my existing examples have a stiffener or backing material, and I think I'd prefer this one the same way. I don't need it to be stiff and upright, as the pin I intend to mount shouldn't be overly heavy.

    So is it just as simple as taking two segments of 3 inch wide ribbon, stitching them together at the ends, stitching it to the side of the bonnet, and then gathering/stitching it at the middle? Or is there some other secret/technique to it? Is there anything I should watch out for before going at it?

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  3. #2
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    I studied the cockade on my Glengarry and enclosed this photo. I see there are two segments (shown by the white paper strip through the center). The top piece is sewn to the bottom strip (indicated by the paper on the left of the photo) and sewn to the cap. I think this may be the best technique for your cap.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 27th November 18 at 12:33 PM.

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  5. #3
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    You could contact Mackie, ask if you could purchase a cockade from them. If everything is done in house, they may have stock to sell / ship.
    Last edited by Baeau; 27th November 18 at 03:46 PM.
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

  6. #4
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    Tarheel, that's about what I figured, and it's the direction I will probably go with it. I just wonder if gathering the front piece at the middle will distort the back piece, and is better done before stitching the whole thing to the bonnet or after.

    Baeau, I suppose buying a pre-made cockade would be an option, but it seems like an unnecessary expense and delay for such a simple item (especially if it has to travel across the Atlantic).

    The other thing I'm wondering is whether a cockade is really necessary. I know it's the usual thing to see these days, but I'm rather fond of the style shown below. Since this Balmoral is a pretty darn close match to the one Sir Iain is wearing, I might try it out with a badge pinned directly to the dicing (with perhaps an internal stiffener) before making a cockade.


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  8. #5
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    The photo of Sir Ian is an excellent example of individualism. A stiffener inside the band would allow for a badge or sprig to be mounted without distorting the shape or aggravating your scalp. Having seen photos of your caps, I think you should consider leaving the cockade off and taking a test flight. A cockade can always be added later if you change your mind.

    I believe there would be a pucker of you try to gather the middle of the front piece after it has been sewn to the back strip. Make the front, then sew that to the back. You may even leave a bit of room between the two pieces so a pin will not distort them further.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 28th November 18 at 03:57 PM.

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  10. #6
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    Post deleted.

    J.S..
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 28th November 18 at 09:38 PM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  12. #7
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    I seem to recall directions for making a cockade being included in Thompson's "So You're Going to wear the Kilt" book. I don't have a copy handy in China to look it up. But I think it was there, along with the directions for making your own toorie, which I know worked as I have done it successfully using them.

    If you have a copy and I am not mistaken about the directions being included, this might be a helpful reference to use.

    Andrew

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  14. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    The other thing I'm wondering is whether a cockade is really necessary. I know it's the usual thing to see these days, but I'm rather fond of the style shown below. Since this Balmoral is a pretty darn close match to the one Sir Iain is wearing, I might try it out with a badge pinned directly to the dicing (with perhaps an internal stiffener)
    That would be my preference. That's a very nice looking piece of head gear. I don't think it needs to be "dressed up" with cockade.
    Tulach Ard

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  16. #9
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    Adding cockade to hand knitted balmoral

    King Andrew is quite correct in Thompson book on pages 86-90 deals with all things bonnets from torries to cockades to finally how to make a new bonnet
    look used!

  17. #10
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    Just a clarification...
    A cockade is a round rosette shape. Hereís a link for making one
    http://blog.americanduchess.com/2010...-cockades.html

    Your picture shows a bow or ribbon.
    Itís about 6 inches of grosgrain ribbon, folded to the centre, slightly gathered and tacked onto the bonnet with the badge attached on top.
    I couldnít find instructions but this picture is very clear due to the pale colours
    https://www.kiltmakers.com/hat6-balmoral-hat-plain.html

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