X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: 1803

  1. #1
    Join Date
    14th March 12
    Location
    North Baltimore Ohio, USA
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    1803

    I'm playing around with some of my older historical attire. I've done many periods over my time in reenacting. I came accross a waist coat that is style in the manner of the early 19th century. I bought it for the Ohio Bicentennial. I've thought about trying it with a kilt since it is rather high waisted so the cut shouldn't be an issue, but what types of kilts were worn in that era. I think I read somewhere that the phillabeg had developed sometime around that era, but would it be too late a period to still wear my great kilt? Not trying to build a new kit or anything, just trying to give myself some more options.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Waistcoat17901815.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	65.0 KB 
ID:	9817

    Mine is the one in the middle except that the back isn't adjustable and the length is shorter by one button.
    Gloria Patri! Thither Yond! Jeremiah! Do-lang Do-lang! (All things I have shouted in a charge.) http://www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    15th August 12
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,312
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm going to go oit on a limb here and say no great kilt...but a box-pleated phillabeg.
    The Official [BREN]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    17th June 11
    Location
    metro Chicago, USA
    Posts
    1,212
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There were a number of kilted regiments in the British army of 1803, as this was just prior to the Penninsular campaign. You may wish to check out the Black Watch (42nd), 93rd, 43rd and 79th Regiments Of Foot dress for the period for demi-mass-produced uniform kilts. Certainly there are Napoleonic reenactors' kilt patterns, somewhere "in the cloud."

    They would have worn a variant of the crimson (ranks) or scarlet (officers) infantryman's "red coat" of the period (pipers and drummers would likely have the jacket in the facing colour). Best of fortune.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,641
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Civilain Highland attrire was in a period of transition at the beginning of the 1800s. You waistcoat pattern would be fine - compare with the one shown in picture No3 here.

    Generally the Feileadh Beag (unsewn pleats) or Box-pleated kilt would be more commonly worn than the Feiieadh Mor at that time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    14th March 12
    Location
    North Baltimore Ohio, USA
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll likely just wear the said waistcoat with my modern made knife pleated kilt until I can get around to making a phillabeg. Like I said, I'm not trying to build a whole new kit. I just want to knock the dust off of a piece of an old kit and let it see the light again. I like this waist coat enough that I may even try to work it into my day wear. It's brown wool so I think it might just work for that. Thanks for all of the replys.
    Last edited by Sir Didymous; 9th February 13 at 06:52 PM.
    Gloria Patri! Thither Yond! Jeremiah! Do-lang Do-lang! (All things I have shouted in a charge.) http://www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    8th June 04
    Location
    Port Crane, New York
    Posts
    2,524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Box-pleated philabegs are pretty easy to make, but if you're not so inclined, this guy has late 18th C. style ones for $100US:

    http://www.just2tailors.com/index1.p...labeg/Wee_kilt
    Brian

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
    Join Date
    14th March 12
    Location
    North Baltimore Ohio, USA
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the link. I wonder if he cuts the rate when you supply your one tartan? Though clan tartans weren't used until later on I think.
    Gloria Patri! Thither Yond! Jeremiah! Do-lang Do-lang! (All things I have shouted in a charge.) http://www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,641
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Didymous View Post
    Thanks for the link. I wonder if he cuts the rate when you supply your one tartan? Though clan tartans weren't used until later on I think.
    He does. read the last sentance on the link.

    In 1803 the very first inklings Clan tartans of clan tartans were beginning to emerge amongst some of the chiefs involved with the Highland Society of London etc but it didn't really take off until just before the 1822 Levee.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    14th March 12
    Location
    North Baltimore Ohio, USA
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I read somewhere that the Ferguson tartan is one of the older ones. I wonder if there is a way to find out just how old. I read the tartan authority's information on it but all it says is that it was in existence before their registery.
    Gloria Patri! Thither Yond! Jeremiah! Do-lang Do-lang! (All things I have shouted in a charge.) http://www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    7th July 09
    Location
    Melbourne,Victoria Australia
    Posts
    3,437
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would say around the 1820. The Maclaren and Ferguson are the same apart from the yellow and white stripes, prior to 1820 the MacLaren was the Regent Tartan being woven by Wilsons for a number of years. Upon the Regent becomming King it was redundant as the Regent tartan but Wilsons apparently contunued to produce it. I would say it was snapped up by the MacLarens in the rush for tartans around that time. I would guess that the same is true for the Fergusons. Or was the Regent tartan a altered copy of a older Ferguson tartan. Good hunting on your quest
    Shoot straight you bastards. Don't make a mess of it. Harry (Breaker) Harbord Morant - Bushveldt Carbineers

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0