X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 69
  1. #1
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Feileadh Mor tartan as camouflage?

    I've heard from several different sources that before the invention of modern dyes pre-Culloden highlanders would use natural dyes (obviously, no modern dyes) from plants and their surroundings to get a very natural and earthy color to their tartans. They would use this as camouflage while sleeping ing the brush, hunting, or hiding from the British.

    Is this true? Do tartans actually serve as effective camouflage? Has anyone tested, tried or use them as such? If so, which tartan, and how did you use it? Pictures would be great!

    Thanks, Derek.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    21st January 17
    Location
    Wiltshire, England
    Posts
    318
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've never tried with tartan it but it should work as the idea of military camouflage is to break up the shape of a person. As long as there are no bright colours or sharp straight lines on the pattern it would work, especially if greens, Browns and black were in it.

  3. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Nomad For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,725
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Given that the majority of surviving specimens of pre-Culloden era tartans are predominately red, one has to question the claimed camouflage use. Warfare of the period did not require camouflage, just look at the British Red coats, and the claim was probably part of a process of demonising the highlander as uncivilised and untrustworthy.

  5. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    30th March 14
    Location
    Newport, North Caolina, USA
    Posts
    240
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do not know about the camo claims but, I have seen my 6 foot 350 pound younger brother vanish in a wooded glade in late spring in South Carolina while wearing all white. Nothing like watching the "Stay Puff Marshmallow Man" vanish in plain sight. Or watch a solid white cat vanish in fresh mowed grass.

    Christoph

  7. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Stoff For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Given that the majority of surviving specimens of pre-Culloden era tartans are predominately red, one has to question the claimed camouflage use. Warfare of the period did not require camouflage, just look at the British Red coats, and the claim was probably part of a process of demonising the highlander as uncivilised and untrustworthy.
    Aren't all the bright tartans from noble or rich people? Didn't they want to show off their wealth and power by wearing expensive and bright clothes?

  9. #6
    Join Date
    18th September 08
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,233
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The concept of camouflaged uniforms pretty much dates from the mid-19th century when British and Indian troops were issued khaki uniforms. Granted, there were a few military units that adapted green as it aided concealment, such as the Rifle Regiment Rifle Brigade, the US Sharpshooters, Hessian Jaegers, and others who had the role of skirmishing with enemy troops to give their own forces time to get sorted out. But these were the exceptions, not the rule.

    That said, some years ago when I was a reenactor in the 77th Highlanders (Montgomery's), I found my Government tartan did provide a degree of camouflage when I found myself isolated during a tactical (war game). I pulled the upper half of my great kilt over my shoulders to conceal my red coat and was very successful in concealing myself from the "French" until I reached friendly lines.

    But, I agree with figheadair, that for the most part in the tactics of the 17th-19th centuries did not require camouflaged kit, so the comments supposedly made about tartan being used as camouflage was probably meant to be derogatory, not complimentary.
    Virginia Commissioner, Elliot Clan Society, USA
    Adjutant, 1745 Appin Stewart Regiment
    Adjutant, Post 2, Scottish-American Military Society
    US Marine (1970-1999)

  10. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Sir William For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,285
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir William View Post
    But, I agree with figheadair, that for the most part in the tactics of the 17th-19th centuries did not require camouflaged kit, so the comments supposedly made about tartan being used as camouflage was probably meant to be derogatory, not complimentary.
    The OP's question, though, wasn't about military uniforms or tactics. It was about hunting/stalking, sleeping in the open, and hiding. Not by uniformed soldiers, but by average civilian Highlanders.

    I would tend to think that camouflage would be a natural benefit of tartans made with natural dyes. The Highlands do have a lot of colour in certain times of the year, and even bright tartans might blend in. As to whether they purposefully made their tartans with this in mind, though, I wot not.

  12. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Tobus For This Useful Post:


  13. #8
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Was it only the French and British armies that fought in that manner or was it pretty universal?

  14. #9
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    The OP's question, though, wasn't about military uniforms or tactics. It was about hunting/stalking, sleeping in the open, and hiding. Not by uniformed soldiers, but by average civilian Highlanders.

    I would tend to think that camouflage would be a natural benefit of tartans made with natural dyes. The Highlands do have a lot of colour in certain times of the year, and even bright tartans might blend in. As to whether they purposefully made their tartans with this in mind, though, I wot not.
    I've read and saw in a documentary that they'd use their tartans to hide from British troops as well as hunting.

  15. #10
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is the documentary. It talks about the plaid at about the 8:15 minute mark.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sT4eHdueekU

  16. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Derekc5555 For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0