X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    23rd February 17
    Location
    South Yorkshire
    Posts
    71
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I'll throw my hat in to the mix and also state that I have only ever pronounced it as 'plaad'! I can't say that whether it is historical or not matters to how I will continue to pronounce it.

    Thank you to those who have shed some light on what the original items in question. I think that they are cooler than a fly plaid if people still go in for that sort of thing, certainly more practical.

    Best,
    Adam

  2. #22
    Join Date
    1st March 09
    Location
    House of Labhran - Highlands of Scotland
    Posts
    148
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    More photos on the same day

    More photos on the same day

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6863a8fb0c8a5b32244eb92eb101d1bb--house-of-windsor-british-royals.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	36.5 KB 
ID:	32074

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jRWKwpQyvbHbp_zmEEGYwJzFjRR_p1a6odm72k1l3f1rkm2aj1tad1fgk4_550x777.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	34.8 KB 
ID:	32075

  3. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to bratach1 For This Useful Post:


  4. #23
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,880
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do wonder when the fashion of wearing plaids in that manner got popular.

    On the vast majority of 19th century photos I have there's no plaid. If there is a plaid it's usually secured with a brooch.

    One does see plaids worn like this, wrapped around the body, but rather loose, and not secured with a brooch.

    It's one of the many things seen both in The Highlanders Of Scotland and in a number of photographs of the same period.









    Here are a couple of the rather rare images of men doing the "Laird's plaid" thing






    (Note the common wearing of wing collar shirts with long neckties.)
    Last edited by OC Richard; 11th October 17 at 05:34 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  5. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  6. #24
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,664
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    I do wonder when the fashion of wearing plaids in that manner got popular.

    On the vast majority of 19th century photos I have there's no plaid. If there is a plaid it's usually secured with a brooch.

    One does see plaids worn like this, wrapped around the body, but rather loose, and not secured with a brooch.

    It's one of the many things seen both in The Highlanders Of Scotland and in a number of photographs of the same period.


    Great example of a full non-tartan Highland outfit.

  7. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  8. #25
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,880
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Great example of a full non-tartan Highland outfit.
    I've got plenty!

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  10. #26
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    13,965
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Those plaid things are best left in the past! They were the very devil to carry smartly as they were always slipping about, much like the plaids in the picture. Thank goodness for the invention good waterproof and warm over-jackets and my lairds plaid has barely seen the light of day for many a decade! Yes, the kilt was worn at the top of the knee or slightly higher in the past, I think mainly because those wearing the kilt knew how to and there were plenty of experienced kilt wearers at hand to advise and yes correct, those that did not quite pass muster----------------unlike today---------- and look what a mess some modern kilt wearers get into!
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 7th January 18 at 06:14 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  11. The Following 7 Users say 'Aye' to Jock Scot For This Useful Post:


  12. #27
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
    Location
    Beijing
    Posts
    389
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I definitely prefer the kilt above the knee (although not too[/I] above the knee

    And I haven't tried it and I'm sure Jock's correct that they slip around, but I do like the look of the "wrap-around" plaids in Richard's historic photos. It certainly wouldn't be an everyday look, but it does have a rakish sort of style to it. But then I'm partial to all sorts of old-fashioned and flamboyant things.

    Andrew

  13. The Following User Says 'Aye' to kingandrew For This Useful Post:


  14. #28
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,880
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    Those plaid things are best left in the past! They were the very devil to carry smartly as they were always slipping about...
    I've never worn one, but I did wonder how people get them to stay in place as they walk around. They always struck me as a bit of an affectation.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  15. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  16. #29
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    13,965
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    I've never worn one, but I did wonder how people get them to stay in place as they walk around. They always struck me as a bit of an affectation.
    Looked at through our eyes OCR I suppose they do look like an affectation, particularly as there are better alternatives these days. But there is no denying that at the period of time of those pictures and before, the lairds plaid did have its uses.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 8th January 18 at 05:41 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  17. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Jock Scot For This Useful Post:


  18. #30
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
    Location
    Beijing
    Posts
    389
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Affected, but useful is an interesting way of putting it.

    This reminds me of an old bumper sticker I saw back in the 70s:
    "If God had meant for us to be naked, we would have been born that way."
    Looked at from that perspective, I fear all our clothes are a bit of an affectation. But they are mighty practical, as well.

    I have a very large scarf and I will admit I tried wrapping it around me as I looked in the mirror, to see if it caught any of the style of these photos. However, it will take a more lordly-sized scarf to wrap around and still have enough to tie over my shoulder.

    Andrew

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0