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  1. #11
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    Yes, jthk, those are historical styles now.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThistleDown View Post
    Yes, jthk, those are historical styles now.
    Thanks!

    I really like some of those styles ... they're not very different from modern jackets and waistcoats and probably wouldn't be too difficult to have one made although quite costly, I'd imagine.

    Jonathan

  4. #13
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    On the figure of Allan Murray (standing next to Mr. Drummond), he appears to be wearing a waistcoat of somewhat antiquated style. It would appear to button all the way to the throat, and the style of laced pock flaps and the "V" opening on the bottom are of the type that was popular during the 4th quarter of the 18th century (give or take a few years earlier or later). With regard to Mr. Murray's jacket, it appears to be of conventional early 19th century style (2nd quarter and later), and looks like an early ancestor of today's Argyll jacket.

    The waistcoat can be had (or you can make one yourself from a pattern) as supplied by reenactor vendors. The jacket pattern can probably be had from historical supply houses, and you would have to have it made by yourself or your tailor.
    Last edited by Orvis; 22nd January 19 at 11:40 AM.

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  6. #14
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    Thanks, Orvis!

    I'm trying to find a picture that OC Richard posted in a recent thread but I'm failing -- it was the black and white photograph detailing several kilted folks from the late 1800s, I think, with a clearly cut-and-pasted photograph of a young kilted boy. If I can find that photo, I'll link.

    Jonathan


    Quote Originally Posted by Orvis View Post
    On the figure of Allan Murray (standing next to Mr. Drummond), he appears to be wearing a waistcoat of somewhat antiquated style. It would appear to button all the way to the throat, and the style of laced pock flaps and the "V" opening on the bottom are of the type that was popular during the 4th quarter of the 18th century (give or take a few years earlier or later). With regard to Mr. Murray's jacket, it appears to be of conventional early 19th century style (2nd quarter and later), and looks like an early ancestor of today's Argyll jacket.

    The waistcoat can be had (or you can make one yourself from a pattern) as supplied by reenactor vendors. The jacket pattern can probably be had from historical supply houses, and you would have to have it made by yourself or your tailor.

  7. #15
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    Orvis: reflecting back at those illustrations, I'd say I'm after something that the Johns Stewart and Robertson appear to be wearing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Orvis View Post
    On the figure of Allan Murray (standing next to Mr. Drummond), he appears to be wearing a waistcoat of somewhat antiquated style. It would appear to button all the way to the throat, and the style of laced pock flaps and the "V" opening on the bottom are of the type that was popular during the 4th quarter of the 18th century (give or take a few years earlier or later). With regard to Mr. Murray's jacket, it appears to be of conventional early 19th century style (2nd quarter and later), and looks like an early ancestor of today's Argyll jacket.

    The waistcoat can be had (or you can make one yourself from a pattern) as supplied by reenactor vendors. The jacket pattern can probably be had from historical supply houses, and you would have to have it made by yourself or your tailor.

  8. #16
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    Jthk,

    The 5-button waistcoat on the figure of Mr. Stewart appears to be very similar to those sold today with day-dress and Argyll jackets. Shouldn't be a problem to obtain.

    The jacket he is wearing appears to be of a style that is available from today's vendors. Again, it shouldn't be hard to obtain one.

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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jthk View Post

    I'm trying to find a picture that OC Richard posted in a recent thread but I'm failing -- it was the black and white photograph detailing several kilted folks from the late 1800s, I think, with a clearly cut-and-pasted photograph of a young kilted boy.
    Ask and ye shall receive...

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  12. #18
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    YES! Thanks, Richard!

    So, if one were to look at the copy/pasted ghost-child and then look at the man on the left. THAT'S the jacket I was thinking of: very similar to today's but it's designed to be buttoned up further than today's 2 or 1 button jackets. I think I count at least 4 buttons on this one.

    Gracias, Richard.
    Jonathan


    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Ask and ye shall receive...


  13. #19
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    Not sure which jacket you mean. That's the cool thing about that photo, the variety of styles.

    There's the ordinary 19th century "sack coat" designed to be buttoned high and left hanging open.

    Here's an unusually high one



    Now with doublets you had civilian-style ones with lapels and open collar showing shirt and tie, and military-style ones that buttoned all the way up.

    Here you have both, two of the former on the left, two of the latter on the right



    Here's an actual military doublet (the Black Watch) showing the elegant cuff and flap shapes seen on the Other Ranks' doublets



    Most soldiers wore scarlet doublets, but pipers wore Archer Green doublets.

    Here's a civilian Pipe Band doublet made very close to the style as worn by army pipers. Note the clunky shape of the flaps, so unlike the stylishly shaped ones on the army doublet above.

    Last edited by OC Richard; 24th January 19 at 07:05 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  15. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Not sure which jacket you mean. That's the cool thing about that photo, the variety of styles.
    If you find that child, then look at the first man to the left of the child. That's the jacket!

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