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  1. #31
    Join Date
    1st March 09
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    House of Labhran - Highlands of Scotland
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    Quote Originally Posted by FossilHunter View Post
    House of Labhran sells a jacket that resembles that historic style.

    House of labhran three button shooting kilt jacket.


    From houseoflabhran.net
    The jacket is not normally worn as a kilt jacket. It is a shooting jacket with action back vents for shooting. Normally worn with plus fours or breeks on the hill for shooting stalking etc. However, it is the same length as many of the jackets worn by Ghillies at Balmoral and many other Highland Estates in the mid 19th C and was worn with kilts. We still wear them today through the shooting season.

    We hope that helps.
    House of Labhran - Scotland

  2. The Following 4 Users say 'Aye' to bratach1 For This Useful Post:


  3. #32
    Join Date
    1st March 09
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    House of Labhran - Highlands of Scotland
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Yes both of those you show are well within the range of variation of what was always called simply "the doublet" and I posted numerous photos above showing that doublets resembling both of those doublets you illustrate existed throughout the 19th century (and well into the 20th).

    I have Highland Dress catalogues up through the 1950s that still carry the doublet, and call it "the doublet".

    Just why and when, perhaps in the mid-20th century, makers started calling the old doublet the "regulation doublet" who can say. But it's just a doublet, there's no such thing as a separate category of doublets called "regulation doublets".

    Likewise the House of Labhran can make a doublet and call it a "Balmoral doublet" but it's just a doublet. I posted several photos showing them dating from c1860 through c1910 and they were always just called a "doublet". In other words there is no such thing as a separate style of doublet called the "Balmoral doublet". Note that HOL's "Balmoral doublet" is nearly identical to the very top photo I posted above.

    Individual makers and sellers can dub their products with any name they choose, but attaching such modern names to things that have been around for over 150 years doesn't change the actual history of the garments and the traditional names used for them.

    About the historical v modern issue, as I see it the doublet had a wide variety of cuts in the c1840-c1920 period but for some reason in the post-WWI era Highland Dress became much more systematised and the so-called "Regulation doublet" became the more or less standard cut of the traditional doublet. The appearance of the Kenmore doublet c1930, the mid-20th century appearance of the Sheriffmuir doublet, and modern offerings such as HOL's "Balmoral" doublet show that doublets are alive and well, and are modern current things.
    To be correct a doublet is just A doublet (derived from the Ital. giubbetta) is a man's snug-fitting jacket that is shaped and fitted to the man's body. Originally it had a stitched and quilted lining ("doubling"). Hence the name. Doublets may or may not have Inverness skirts as long as they are closely fitting to the body. To be honest the widely known Regulation doublet is not a doublet, but a coatee. Our House of Labhran Balmoral doublet is based on one that was made by an old tailor we knew on Royal Deeside ( by Balmoral ) , sadly he is no longer with us.

    Regards
    House of Labhran - Scotland

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