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  1. #1
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    Jacobite Era Coat on display at NMS

    An interesting short frock coat in an unnamed tartan with velvet collar and cuffs and lined in wool twill and linen. Associated with Prince Charles Edward Stuart. It belongs to the NMS and will appear in their forthcoming Jacobite exhibition.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #2
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    Very Nice, Now I just need to see how the tails are done.....

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke MacGillie View Post
    Very Nice, Now I just need to see how the tails are done.....
    I would expect that it has 3 vents, one centre and one on each side in the same way the Culloden Coat and others have.

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  6. #4
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    My guess as well, Im way down in the weeds on things like this, as you well known. For me, I have this thesis that early period Scots tailoring used just simple vents, not pleated tails like in other, English and Continental tailoring. Outside of Scotland, how the vents were done differentiated between what would be a sleeved waistcoat worn under another garment vs a jacket or actual coat.

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  8. #5
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    Luke, the coat I've recently examined has pleated side vents. I had a look at the Culloden Coat for comparison and was amazed to find that the tails have what looks like rear entry openings. I'd always thought that this one didn't have pockets but it now looks like they are integral.

    As for the NMS coat, there's something about it that doesn't ring true. I can't work out the apparent double breasted lapels and single breasted lower section. Note also the Crail cuffs with velvet turn back cuffs. I wonder if itís been altered at a later date, perhaps during the Highland Revival or for George IVís visit.

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  10. #6
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    It reminds me very much of the type of coats that became common in the 1750's here in North America among rangers and Light Infantry, which, IMHO had its genus in Sporting wear of the period.......

    There is also a good bit of documentation that that style of coat was worn by the 77th from its standing up in 57, and by the 42nd from 62 to 68. See the painting of John Campbell of Melfort for one with slightly longer lapels, but with the 3 button closure below the lapels.

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  12. #7
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    Interesting. And the tail pockets on the Culloden Coat?

  13. #8
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    Pockets in the tails is not unheard of, its even mentioned in IIRC Cuthbertson as being the preferred place to put soldiers pockets as otherwise, soldiers being soldiers, they would stuff their pockets full of stolen items and ruin the proper silhouette desired in the period.

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  15. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke MacGillie View Post
    Pockets in the tails is not unheard of, its even mentioned in IIRC Cuthbertson as being the preferred place to put soldiers pockets as otherwise, soldiers being soldiers, they would stuff their pockets full of stolen items and ruin the proper silhouette desired in the period.
    Luke and Peter,

    Two weekends ago at the Ft. Frederick 18th c. market fair, I spoke with a seamstress (Missy, whom you may know, Luke) who specializes in period Highland clothing and who has been to Glasgow to view/examine the Culloden coat. I, too, asserted that the tail openings looked like pockets to me, but after examining the coat photos and on the basis of her examination of the coat itself, she said they were not - it was the result of the way the cloth at the vents were pleated and joined. Not having seen the actual coat myself, I took her word for it.

    FYI Peter, I found a seamstress to make my repro jacket from the "Old Culloden" cloth and photos you provided - I should see some results in about six months. This lady exhibited good knowledge of 18th c. Highland attire and agreed with Missy about the tail openings, so I'm optimistic at this point. We'll see...

    Gerry

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  17. #10
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    Peter,
    Having examined an enlarged version of the coat photo, I am of the opinion that it is consistent with the mid-1740's. Highland jackets were somewhat in advance of the rest of Britain in having collars (sometimes appliqued on separately and not part of the body of the coat). The "crail" cuffs with a cuff are of a type that was used in that day on British Army regimental coats, and the short lapels with the three lower closure buttons are also of a type known then (see the portrait of Lord Loudoun in his regimentals). The use of velvet as an ornament was not unknown and certainly could have been used by a wealthy man to display his high status. The only surprise to me was that the tartan is not red-based. My tuppence worth.

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