X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    16th January 11
    Location
    Gastonia, NC
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Kilts in the English Civil Wars/War of the Three Kingdoms

    I was thinking about Highlanders who may have fought for Charles I with Montrose and later for Charles II and if they would have worn kilts. I can't seem to find any photos of what the Scottish Royalist armies of this time would have worn, aside from the lowlanders who wore the same as most English troops of the time. What other sorts of clothing would they have worn? Doublets/soldier coats? Non-tartan hose? Did they still wear the bonnets? Mortuary hilts rather than basket hilts? Inquiring minds would like to know!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    8th June 04
    Location
    Port Crane, New York
    Posts
    2,524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    By the 1630s-40s, the belted plaid (but NOT the "little kilt") had been in use for many decades. Knitted bonnets, tartan hose, short-waisted doublets were common wear during this period, and dirks and basket-hilted swords were in the process of acquiring their classic configurations (mortuary hilts were not considered a Scottish style).



    Last edited by Woodsheal; 9th May 12 at 05:01 PM.
    Brian

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    26th December 11
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    507
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    after shooting, what would one do with the musket when the enemy closes? you have a sword and dirk (no bayonette-this is not france, after all), and the musket is a rather expensive item to just toss down in a field (i do not remember seeing a sling or a stacking swivel in any of the pics you have posted in your period garb), and it looks a bit too delicate to simply use as a club on a regular basis.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    16th January 11
    Location
    Gastonia, NC
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think that with the concept of the Highland charge, you never let the enemy close on you -- you closed on the enemy with sword, dirk, axe or other kinds of makeshift weapons. I think it has been documented that muskets were dropped after firing off the meager ammunition before commencing the charge. However, in the time I'm talking about, they were still using the big heavy matchlocks, which were definitely swung as clubs in close quarters with the enemy in pike & shot formations.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    8th June 04
    Location
    Port Crane, New York
    Posts
    2,524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The "fish tailed" muskets of the time were indeed used as clubs, if the bad guys got close enough - but the pikemen were supposed to prevent that from happening. Highlanders, however (the few of them that had firearms) would toss the guns down, draw their broadswords, and have at it....
    Brian

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

  6. #6
    Join Date
    30th June 10
    Location
    San Francisco, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,182
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What Woodsheal said. In both posts.
    "It's all the same to me, war or peace,
    I'm killed in the war or hung during peace."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    8th June 04
    Location
    Port Crane, New York
    Posts
    2,524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The classic study regarding highlanders of the civil wars period is "Highland Warrior" by David Stevenson:
    http://www.questia.com/library/book/...-stevenson.jsp
    Last edited by Woodsheal; 9th May 12 at 08:13 PM.
    Brian

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

  8. #8
    Join Date
    26th December 11
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    507
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ok--so the muskets of the time period were the big, heavy matchlock muskets that were more like this: --not the flintlock that woodsheel has in his pic.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    30th June 10
    Location
    San Francisco, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,182
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by opositive View Post
    ok--so the muskets of the time period were the big, heavy matchlock muskets that were more like this:

    --not the flintlock that woodsheel has in his pic.
    Actually you could go either way, depending on just when during the civil war period you're talking about, as the flintlock was developed circa 1630.
    "It's all the same to me, war or peace,
    I'm killed in the war or hung during peace."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    16th January 11
    Location
    Gastonia, NC
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is true, but those doglocks were not that common -- costing double or more what a matchlock did. Only a few elite units got to carry them, like artillery guards, since they had less chance of igniting cannon powder than the smoldering matchlock cords.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0