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Thread: Plaid export

  1. #1
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    Plaid export

    I heard recently that in the 18th century there was quite a market for used clothing being sold or exported from england/Scotland...
    First, does anyone know anything about this?
    And second, is there any indication Scottish plaids were exported, or repurposed into other garments in the 18th century??
    Thanks
    Ben

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    There is nothing in them on plaids but pages 248 - 249 here may be of interest:
    https://books.google.com.au/books?id...ritain&f=false
    Last edited by Bruce Scott; 23rd June 17 at 05:57 PM.

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    Not exported by a good and rare example of a reused (repurposed) plaid - http://www.scottishtartans.co.uk/Isa...ress_c1785.pdf

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  5. #4
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    The Boston News-Letter
    Description: Advertisement: Mr. John BORLAND's Warehouse, Goods for Sale by Mr. Laurence DINWIDIE.
    Date: August 17 1719
    At Mr. John BORLAND's warehouse on the dock in Fifth Market, Boston, the following goods are to be sold very reasonably by Mr. Laurence DINWIDIE, viz. several sorts of Scotch, linens, kentings, plaides, bohea and green tea, sundry sorts of haberdashery ware, Dutch tyles for chimneys, fine mapps for most parts of the world, flower, pork and hull'd barley.

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  7. #5
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    The first thing I posted, that was for sure exported cloth for sale. Now these run away ads, they all show items of Scottish dress being worn in North America, mostly, "Scotch Plaiden Hose", most likely is actual not tartan, but a ribbed cotton or linen cloth cut into hose.

    Description: Reward Offered For Five Runaway Servants Belonging to Governor SPOTSWOOD.
    Date: May 31 1722
    Run away the 22d of April last, from Germanna in Virginia, five servant men, belonging to his Excellency Colonel SPOTSWOOD, Governor of Virginia, by name, John COLE, Henry REDWOOD, Solomon GAAR, Edmund THOMAS and George MACDONNALD. The said COLE, an Englishman, speaking remarkably on the West-Country dialect, of a middle stature, fair complexion, land hair, aged about 30 years, and a Wheelwright by trade. The said REDWOOD, an Englishman, speaking broad West-Country, of a tall stature, brown complexion, thin visage, lank hair, aged about 30 years, an able Sawyer, and having his razors and hone, serves upon occasion as a Barber. The said GAAR, an Englishman, speaking likewise as a West-Country man, of a remarkable large stature, round large visage, fresh comely complexion, land hair, aged about 30 years, a Miller by profession, of a good Waggoner upon occasion. The said THOMAS, an Englishman, of a middle stature, slender size, brown complexion, curled hair, aged about twenty five years, a Carter and Husbandman by profession. And the said MACDONNALD, A Scotsman, speaking broad Scots, of a middle stature, thick size, round visage, freckled complexion, wearing a wig, aged about twenty two years, a Taylor by trade.

    The remarkable cloathing which they are known to have gone away with was, duffle surtout coats, whereof four were red and one blue, new cotton wastcoats knapt and of a sea green colour, leather breeches, whereof some newly made, and linnen trowsers, new Scots plaiden hose, besides other sorts of stockings, new shirts of ozenbrigs, and Scots tweed linnen (whereof each runaway had two at least) which are marked on the breast with figures of different numbers, between 20 and 90. John COLE had in particular a figured calico wastcoat without sleeves, which is to tie on the side, and a gun with him, and George MACDONNALD had a light coloured kersey coat made frock fashion, with four or five buttons and not lin'd.

    Whoever secures all, or any one of the said servants, and delivers them to the Sheriff of any of the counties within this Province of Pennsylvania, or of the Counties of Newcastle, Kent or Susses upon Delaware, shall, upon any of the said Sheriffs receit, for all, or any one or more of the said servants, produced to George BARCLAY, Secretary to His Excellency the Governor of the said Province and Counties, receive two pistoles reward for each of these runaways, so delivered, as aforesaid, with reasonable charges.

    Description: Three Servants Named Daniel MACRAW, John ROSS and Thomas HAILY Run Away From Their Masters, Charles DICK, John MITCHELL and Dr. William LYNN.
    Date: October 23 1746 Newspaper published in: Philadelphia, PA
    Philadelphia, October 9. 1746.

    Run away from the subscribers, on the 20th of July last, three servant men, viz. Daniel MACRAW, a Scotch Highland man, belonging to Charles DICK, merchant in Fredericksburgh, of short stature, about 5 foot 2 inches high, speaks broken English, of a swarthy conmplexion, with short curled hair; and had on when he went away, a coarse bear skin coat, with brass buttons, a pair of brown linnen trowsers, and brown linnen shirt.

    John ROSS, a Scotch Highland boy, belonging to John MITCHELL, merchant in Fredericksburgh, about 16 years of age, of a ruddy complexion, his hair cut off, speaks broken English; and had on when he went away, an oznabrigs shirt, trowsers and breeches, with straps to the breeches, a tartan jacket, without sleeves, lined with green shaloon, a silk handkerchief, felt hat; he carried with him two old linnen jackets, one flower'd, and one white shirt.

    Thomas HAILY, an Irishman, from Doctor William LYNN, in Fredericksburgh, about 5 feet 8 inches high, of a fair complexion, speaks good English, is about 20 or 21 years of age, his hair cut off, his head full of scars; and had on when he went away, a dark coloured broad cloth coat, double breasted, with white metal buttons, oznabrigs shirt and trowsers, and a white linnen shirt, and old fine hat.

    Whoever secures said servants in any publick goal, or brings them to their said masters in Fredericksburgh, shall receive 2 pistoles reward for each, besides what the law allows, from Charles DICK, John MITCHELL, or William LYNN.

    Boston Evening Post
    Description: John HARRISON Offers Ten Dollars Reward For Runaway Apprentice Named Robert CORLETT.
    Date: December 5 1763 Newspaper published in: Boston, MA

    Run away from his Master Mr. John HARRISON, about the 15th of last month, an Apprentice lad, whose name is Robert CORLETT, about 24 years old, by trade a Taylor, born in the Isle of Man, about 5 feet 5 inches high, somewhat freckled and pockbroken, with his own hair; he carry'd cloaths with him, consisting of blue cloth jackets, a plaid waistcoat, a pair of dark cloth breeches, a pair of brown thickset breeches, and a brown camblet coat. Whoever will apprehend said servant, and secure him in any of his Majesty's goals, or give notice to the abovesaid Alexander BOIES, shall have ten dollars reward, and all necessary charges paid.


    New England Weekly Journal
    Description: Three Servants Run Away From Their Masters: Andrew STEWART From Edward Gray, James MITCHEL From Caleb Joseph GRAY, and John ODINELL From Philip MORTIMER.
    Date: October 17 1738 Newspaper published in: Boston, MA

    Ran away last night from his Master, Mr. Edward GRAY of Boston, Ropemaker, a Scotch boy about 17 years of age, named Andrew STEWART of a tawny complexion & small stature. He had on when he went away a new bluish kersey jacket, white shirt, ticken breeches, white stockings, a new hat and shoes.

    Ran away at the same time, an Irish servant belonging to Caleb Joseph GRAY, Ropemaker, named James MITCHEL, about 19 years of age, speaks good English, fresh complection, thick legs & clumbsy set. He had on two jackets, one thick white woolen the other homespun. He either wears a cap or wigg.

    Also, an Irish servant belonging to Philip MORTIMER, Ropemaker, about 17 years of age, named John ODINELL, a tall slim fellow, smooth fac'd, he has an impediment or lisp in his speech, & talks broad in the Irish dialect. He had on when he went away a brown kersey pea jacket, homespun wastecoat, kersey breeches, oznabrigs trousers, check woollen shirt, worsted cap, gray yarnstockings and old shoes and breeches.

    Whoever shall take up the above said servants, and convey them to their Masters at Boston, shall have forty shillings reward for each, and all necessary charges paid.

    All Masters of vessels are hereby caution'd not to carry off the said servants, as they would avoid the penalty of the law. October 11. 1738.





    Pennsylvania Gazette
    Description: Two Convict Servant Men Named Thomas JOHNSON and Richard PRESTWOOD Run Away From the Nottingham Iron Works.
    Date: April 27 1747 Newspaper published in: Philadelphia, PA

    Run away from the Nottingham iron works, in Baltimore county, two convict servant men, viz. Thomas JOHNSON, and English man, about thirty years of age, pretty tall, of a black complexion, he pretends to be lame in one of his arms. Had on when he went away, an old blue coat, with white metal buttons, old plaid jacket, oznabrigs shirt, old leather breeches, plaiding hose, old shoes, with odd buckles. Richard PRESTWOOD, an Englishman, about forty years of age, middle sized, of a black complexion, has had one of his legs broke, which occasions him to go with two crutches. Had on an old brown coat, with leather buttons, old linsey jacket, coarse linnen shirt, old linnen breeches, old stockings and shoes, an old hat, with white linnen sew'd round the brim. They took with them some clothes, and may be suppos'd to have chang'd their dress. Whoever apprehends the said runaways, and secures them, so as they may be had again, shall have three pounds the currency where taken, paid by Alexander LAWSON.

    The Pennsylvania Gazette
    Description: Two Servants Named Thomas WILSON and STEWART Run Away From the Ship Baltimore.
    Date: July 16 1741

    Newspaper published in: Philadelphia, PA

    Run away in June last, from on board the ship Baltimore, in Chester-River, Maryland, two Scots servant men. One named Thomas WILSON, a short well made man, and has been in the army. Had on a plad jacket and breeches, yarn hose, check shirt, a blue bonnet, or new felt hat, his hair turned up with a comb which probably he has cut off. The other named STEWART, but is supposed to have taken the name of James BORSON, a low sized thick made young man, fresh complexion, bushy hair. Had on a light coloured frize coat, blue half thick jacket, ozengrigs trowsers, white shirt, new felt hat, old shoes, worsted stockings, wears often a black ribbon round his neck. Whoever secures said servants, so that they may be had again, shall have forty shillings reward, and reasonable charges paid by John DRUMMOND, as Sassafras-Ferry, in Maryland.

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  9. #6
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    Luke,

    I have seen the runaway advertisement for the Highland servant from Fredericksburg, Virginia, with his tartan sleeveless jacket lined with green shaloon. I have previously come across information (can't find it now) that Highland tartan was purchased for export to the colonies as it was considered a rough cloth that was fit for slaves and servants. I presume this trade really took off after The Forty-Five and the establishment of firms like Wilson's & Sons, and lasted into the 19th century.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orvis View Post
    Luke,

    I have seen the runaway advertisement for the Highland servant from Fredericksburg, Virginia, with his tartan sleeveless jacket lined with green shaloon. I have previously come across information (can't find it now) that Highland tartan was purchased for export to the colonies as it was considered a rough cloth that was fit for slaves and servants. I presume this trade really took off after The Forty-Five and the establishment of firms like Wilson's & Sons, and lasted into the 19th century.
    Here's a letter dated 22 Dec 1797

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1797-12-22 from Mason & Thomson ref Linsay for Negro wear.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	128.9 KB 
ID:	31154


    The relevant section reads:

    Send us 200 yd Linsay the The Inclosed pattern – the article is fr negro wear and must be very low priced if possible not above 1/- or under if you can. It must also be had befr 1 January as a vessel sails early in the Year from Port Glasgow.

    Linsay refers to linsey-woolsey cloth and not Lindsay tartan which did not exist until c1830-40.

    This is the only reference I know of to Negro wear and the mention of Linsay and the fact that it was from Wilsons, famous for weaving tartan, probably led to the assumption that tartan was used. By the standards of the day tartan was relatively expensive and is unlikely to have been used for slave wear.
    Last edited by figheadair; 24th June 17 at 11:50 PM.

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  12. #8
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    Copied From: http://www.kinnaird.net/tartan.htm


    "One account suggests that brightly coloured tartan shawls were popular with the slave owners in the West Indies of the late eighteenth century, because slaves wearing the shawls could easily be seen if they ever ran away. The correspondence files of Wilson's of Bannockburn contain a letter from Jamaica which says:

    Please send 200 yards of Lindsay to the enclosed pattern. As it is for Negro wear it must be low price, not above one shilling a yard if you can. "

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Scott View Post
    Copied From: http://www.kinnaird.net/tartan.htm


    "One account suggests that brightly coloured tartan shawls were popular with the slave owners in the West Indies of the late eighteenth century, because slaves wearing the shawls could easily be seen if they ever ran away. The correspondence files of Wilson's of Bannockburn contain a letter from Jamaica which says:

    Please send 200 yards of Lindsay to the enclosed pattern. As it is for Negro wear it must be low price, not above one shilling a yard if you can. "
    That's the letter shown in the previous post. See my comments on Linsay (not Lindsay).
    Last edited by figheadair; 26th June 17 at 10:28 AM.

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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Rhat's the letter shown in the previous post. See my comments on Linsay (not Lindsay).
    Thanks Peter. Your information clarifies that issue for me.

    Gerry

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