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Thread: Took the plunge

  1. #1
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    Took the plunge

    -->> There will be pictures by the end of the week.

    As I've advanced in years, I find that I'm no longer at the top of the heap in the 50-59 age class for the heavy athletics. The Pleasanton Championships are really for the best of the best and I'm now ranked 26th in north America, rather than the 13th I was four years ago. So, this year and last, I've decided to not apply to compete at the Pleasanton Championships. I'll be back next year, when I'm 60.

    Instead, I'm taking a role as an 18th Century highlander in a good friends living history guild. I have the plaid. The "jacobite" shirt is going to a guitar playing friend and I've ordered a much more timely shirt and waistcoat from a seamstress I found on Etsy. I picked up a pair of budget buckle brogues, as well. The cadadh won't be spot-on, but they'll be more or less close. It's going to be in the 90's, so a heavy wool coat would be a waste. We shall see. Whatever the case, acquiring this kit was not cheap.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

  2. The Following 7 Users say 'Aye' to Alan H For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
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    so I may see you at the games this weekend ? I will be there at the 151st games ...
    Marc E Ferguson - IT Manager
    Clan Fergusson Society of North America
    ------------------------------------------------
    Nosce te ipsum - Dulcius ex asperis - insert wittty tri-fecta latin-ism here

  4. #3
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    I will either be in:
    1.) the Living History area...the largish lad with the tan/brown waistcoat or
    2.) in the MacNaughton clan tent or
    3.) watching one of the lads that I coach take a crack at winning the Amateur Caber Championships, out on the track on Sunday afternoon.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

  5. #4
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    Cognoscenti, I'll pass along a recommendation... I had a good experience purchsing a 1750's-style waistcoat and a banded-collar shirt from Folklore Fashions on ETSY

    https://www.etsy.com/shop/FolkloreFa..._shop_redirect

    Rosalind was good to work with and she made a few adaptions to her patterns to suit me. For example, she cut the shirt extra-long. She asked for measurements to tailor the waistcoat and shirt to me, personally. Now, she got the neck of the shirt very slightly tight, but it's a five minute job to move the buttons.

    For hardcore re-neactors, her stuff will not do. It's machine-sewn...the buttonholes for example are machine-sewn. There are obvious machine-sewn hems. The buttons are plastic, not bone, wood or metal. On the waistcoat I ordered, it came with pocket flaps, but no actual pockets. The material is a nice medium-to-lightweight cotton, not wool.

    For me, this is perfect. Her prices are half of what the "real" re-enactors stuff costs, like stuff from Jas Townsend. I'm going for the basic "look" not exact replicas. Considering that the other men in the guild will be wearing something that's not even vaguely period-correct, I figure that I'm ahead of the game already. I don't want to spend a mint on stuff that I'm going to wear to two events a year and Halloween. Besides, Pleasanton will be in the 90's this year. It's often 100+ degrees F. The last thing I want to wear is a full-on wool tartan period jacket. I thought about getting a sleeved waistcoat and figured I'd probably expire during the weekend if I did that.

    OK, so with that...here's my question. See the lad on the far right?



    That's more or less what I'm trying to achieve, minus the claymore, hair () jabot and cuffs. So gents, how do I get my 4-yard long, 60-inch wide plaid to belt around the hips like that? I know how to get it over my shoulder, but not how to do as illustrated here.

    NOTE: I may just bail on the big plaid and wear my box-pleated 4-yard kilt.
    Last edited by Alan H; 30th August 16 at 04:38 PM.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

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  7. #5
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    I will be there as an co-convener for The Clan Fergusson , we are having our Societies AGM there , and will be looking to tatse the left coasts finest spirits , and maybe find a Cromach or dirk .
    Marc E Ferguson - IT Manager
    Clan Fergusson Society of North America
    ------------------------------------------------
    Nosce te ipsum - Dulcius ex asperis - insert wittty tri-fecta latin-ism here

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Cognoscenti, I'll pass along a recommendation... I had a good experience purchsing a 1750's-style waistcoat and a banded-collar shirt from Folklore Fashions on ETSY

    https://www.etsy.com/shop/FolkloreFa..._shop_redirect

    Rosalind was good to work with and she made a few adaptions to her patterns to suit me. For example, she cut the shirt extra-long. She asked for measurements to tailor the waistcoat and shirt to me, personally. Now, she got the neck of the shirt very slightly tight, but it's a five minute job to move the buttons.

    For hardcore re-neactors, her stuff will not do. It's machine-sewn...the buttonholes for example are machine-sewn. There are obvious machine-sewn hems. The buttons are plastic, not bone, wood or metal. On the waistcoat I ordered, it came with pocket flaps, but no actual pockets. The material is a nice medium-to-lightweight cotton, not wool.

    For me, this is perfect. Her prices are half of what the "real" re-enactors stuff costs, like stuff from Jas Townsend. I'm going for the basic "look" not exact replicas. Considering that the other men in the guild will be wearing something that's not even vaguely period-correct, I figure that I'm ahead of the game already. I don't want to spend a mint on stuff that I'm going to wear to two events a year and Halloween. Besides, Pleasanton will be in the 90's this year. It's often 100+ degrees F. The last thing I want to wear is a full-on wool tartan period jacket. I thought about getting a sleeved waistcoat and figured I'd probably expire during the weekend if I did that.

    OK, so with that...here's my question. See the lad on the far right?



    That's more or less what I'm trying to achieve, minus the claymore, hair () jabot and cuffs. So gents, how do I get my 4-yard long, 60-inch wide plaid to belt around the hips like that? I know how to get it over my shoulder, but not how to do as illustrated here.

    NOTE: I may just bail on the big plaid and wear my box-pleated 4-yard kilt.
    Alan,

    Glad you went to a seamstress to get a fairly accurate 1740's shirt. As a long-time reenactor (who now does a Jacobite impression), I can tell you that having machine-sewn seams on the shirt is no great sin, unless you feel like forking over mega-bucks for it. My linen shirts have machine-sewn seams - only the few seams that can be seen are hand-worked. As to the three gentlemen pictured, they look pretty good. The only things I would fine to criticize are the plaid brooch on the left fellow (didn't have men's brooches then), whereas the middle fellow is using a correct bodkin to secure his plaid. All three gentlemen are obviously wearing modern knitted hose - 1740's hose would have been made from cloth. You can learn how to do this - it's not hard. Also the fellow on the left has chains on the by-knives in his dirk scabbard - I've never seen a representation of this until the 19th c. Also, their waistcoats (with the "V" openings at the bottoms) are in a 1770's style - in the 1740's the waistcoat bottoms would have been straight. Just niggling, but you know reenactors - the average member of the visiting public won't have a clue!

    As to putting on the plaid, it is probably best that you practice putting it on at home by spreading it on the floor and doing the pleating yourself. If your hips are large, the pleats don't have to overlap, thus giving you more to play with. If you plan to turn out often in your plaid, you can install drawstrings to enable you to put it on quickly standing up. When putting my plaid on at home, I use a full-length mirror to help me make any adjustments - or your wife can do that for you. But if you look like a walking laundry pile, that's okay, since original 18th c. Highlanders (except the gentry) probably looked that way more often than not. Also, original 18th c. Highlanders were reported to wear their plaids with the hemline high (like a mini-kilt), which is something not many do today. It doesn't leave much to the imagination.

  9. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Orvis For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
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    Welcome to the world of re-enacting!

    I've been at it (on and off) since I was a teenager.

    I've done US Civil War, WWI, and WWII. But never 18th century.

    It's very rewarding, for me anyway, that quest to get everything as "right" as you can get it.

    See you in a few days! I'll try to drop by the historical encampment.

    I'll be up there with the Long Beach Pipe Band.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    See the lad on the far right?
    [/I]
    I recognize him from the highland games in Eagle River, AK. I think his name was Teague. I saw him around a lot during the 14 years I lived in Alaska.

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orvis View Post
    Alan,

    Glad you went to a seamstress to get a fairly accurate 1740's shirt. As a long-time reenactor (who now does a Jacobite impression), I can tell you that having machine-sewn seams on the shirt is no great sin, unless you feel like forking over mega-bucks for it. My linen shirts have machine-sewn seams - only the few seams that can be seen are hand-worked. As to the three gentlemen pictured, they look pretty good. The only things I would fine to criticize are the plaid brooch on the left fellow (didn't have men's brooches then), whereas the middle fellow is using a correct bodkin to secure his plaid. All three gentlemen are obviously wearing modern knitted hose - 1740's hose would have been made from cloth. You can learn how to do this - it's not hard.
    A few years ago I found some "tartan" (it's not a twill weave) semi-stretchy wool. It's actually a wool/acrylic mix with some elastic sewn in. I made myself a pair of cadadh from the stuff. So now I need to find some knitted ties to wrap around the upper part. I just tried on the cadadh and the thin inner socks I wear with them, with my uber-cheap chinese-made buckle brogues. Well, it's a bit tight over the instep, but it'll do.

    Also the fellow on the left has chains on the by-knives in his dirk scabbard - I've never seen a representation of this until the 19th c. Also, their waistcoats (with the "V" openings at the bottoms) are in a 1770's style - in the 1740's the waistcoat bottoms would have been straight. Just niggling, but you know reenactors - the average member of the visiting public won't have a clue!
    The waistcoat I've got is V'd at the bottom. Honest truth is that I'll probably open up the cutaway a bit more when I have time. It's flopping all over the sporran right now. However, for this weekend, it's going to be fine.

    As to putting on the plaid, it is probably best that you practice putting it on at home by spreading it on the floor and doing the pleating yourself. If your hips are large, the pleats don't have to overlap, thus giving you more to play with. If you plan to turn out often in your plaid, you can install drawstrings to enable you to put it on quickly standing up.
    I have a 4 1/2 yard plaid and I've cheated by sewing in about 10 pleats in the back! It'll need a touch of ironing, I'm afraid. When I chose the pattern I tried to be careful about the colors. You can see a picture of it, and me "in theory" doing a "late 1500's" Guild a few years ago here:



    Never mind the "dirk" / "dagger". It's the only edged weapon I had, having won it at a Games a few years ago. It's quite pretty and has nothing whatsoever to do with Scotland!
    Anyway, I know how to fold/put on the plaid, just not sure how to get it tucked in around my hips.

    The When putting my plaid on at home, I use a full-length mirror to help me make any adjustments - or your wife can do that for you. But if you look like a walking laundry pile, that's okay, since original 18th c. Highlanders (except the gentry) probably looked that way more often than not. Also, original 18th c. Highlanders were reported to wear their plaids with the hemline high (like a mini-kilt), which is something not many do today. It doesn't leave much to the imagination.
    I'm a bit modest for that! LOL
    Last edited by Alan H; 31st August 16 at 11:14 AM.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Welcome to the world of re-enacting!

    I've been at it (on and off) since I was a teenager.

    I've done US Civil War, WWI, and WWII. But never 18th century.

    It's very rewarding, for me anyway, that quest to get everything as "right" as you can get it.

    See you in a few days! I'll try to drop by the historical encampment.

    I'll be up there with the Long Beach Pipe Band.
    It'll be good to see you! Come on over and play for us!

    I'm just doing this because I'm friends with the GuildMistress. She's the chairman for the Ardenwood Tartan Day Games, which I've been the athletic director for, for about 6 years now. I'm a bit old to compete in the 50-59's this year, so I figured I'd help her out. She's just glad to get another male in her encampment!
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

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