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  1. #41
    guardsman is offline Oops, it seems this member needs to update their email address
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    If I had a cousin who was adopted , I think I would be a bit upset if he didn't wear the families clan tartan , after all clan is family is it not ? My father has step children and step grandchildren all the same as his own, each and all the same .

  2. #42
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    Being a step-father, I can say my experience mirror's Jock's. My daughter did not know her birth father though, and has never carried his name (long story, but the short of it was for her protection). She did know her maternal grandparents and she's a MacLean of Duart, by blood. However, she has asked me for a Cummings sash for her upcoming wedding. As my daughter, she is getting one.

    Arguably , a tartan adopted by a clan is the property of the clan, by tradition, and the right to wear said tartan is not based on name, or blood, but acceptance of the Clan Chief as a member of the clan. Of course, most (if not all) Chiefs have stated anyone of the bloodline/name is a member of the Clan, but if a person wanted to join a Clan not of their birth/name I would assume they could apply to the Chief to become one officially via a form of adoption. Why am I pointing this out? Because historically, far enough back, the Chief was the law. Adoption, legally, is the action of making a person the complete and full child of the adoptive parents. As the flow of time and events have removed the law from the Chief and to the State, thus the inclusion of an adopted child as a member of the clan would be part of that legal status.

    Another example, a man dies with no will. His only immediate family living is his son, who was adopted at birth. By law, the son is the ONLY heir to the man's estate, over the decedents sisters and brothers. This can include any inheritable titles of nobility with the consent of the Crown as the leader of the nobility. So, the leader of the clan, the Chief, just has to give his consent for any adopted child to be a member of the clan.

    Therefore, if you really want to make a BIG OFFICIAL deal out of it, just ask your Clan Chief. (I think he or she would think you're an idiot, but there you go.)
    Last edited by Deirachel; 14th July 13 at 06:07 PM.
    Death before Dishonor -- Nothing before Coffee

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione

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  4. #43
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    I was unaware of many of these customs when I started this thread. I can appreciate that it is a deeply personal subject and appreciate the annecdotes shared herein. There is much to learn from the ladies and gentlemen here.
    The Official [BREN]

  5. #44
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    Yeah. We're really not a bad bunch, are we!
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

  6. #45
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    If a child is adopted, in the eyes of the law, they are fully and legally a member of that family, and therefore by default eligeble to wear your tartan should they so desire.
    My stepson has alrady asked me to buy/make him a MacLeod kilt, and I am only to happy to do this. He is, afterall, MY son as far as he, his mother, my family and I are concerned.
    Martin.
    AKA - The Scouter in a Kilt.
    Proud, but homesick, son of Skye.
    Member of the Clan MacLeod Society (Scotland)

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    Yeah. We're really not a bad bunch, are we!

    Plus one, Padre. One big Plus One!!!
    The Official [BREN]

  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laird_M View Post
    If a child is adopted, in the eyes of the law, they are fully and legally a member of that family, and therefore by default eligeble to wear your tartan should they so desire.
    My stepson has alrady asked me to buy/make him a MacLeod kilt, and I am only to happy to do this. He is, afterall, MY son as far as he, his mother, my family and I are concerned.
    My 6 year old granddaughter is adopted from Kiev, Ukraine. She became a legal member of our family, and a US citizen, as soon as her adoption documents cleared the required court hearing. She gave the most memorable reaction upon seeing my kilt for the first time, "mama, grandpa is wearing a skirt!" My daughter had to explain what a kilt was, because Katie still speaks a mixture of English and Russian.
    Bruce, Clan Muirhead

    Be who you are; those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.

  9. #48
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    Cool Some thoughts on adoption

    We generally think of adoption with a touch of astrocization. Especially more recent centuries. Though that has greatly lessened in the past century.

    But this was NOT always the case, especially in earlier and more primal cultures. In Roman era, adoption was considered a stronger legal binding than natural birth. Apparently the argument could be made that a natural born son was NOT the son you wanted. Where as that could not be made in regards to an adopted son. In fact, it was not uncommon to adopt ones own child. By doing so, this affirmed that individual as the chosen heir.

    Likewise, in earlier cultures, it was not uncommon for someone who had done a great favor or earned respect in some way to be adopted either into a family or a clan. You'll discover a great many "white men" were part of native american tribes and cultures. You young man have done me a great service. I embrace you as my son, now here...marry my daughter. LOLZ.

    Many cultures also had the tradition of war babies. Where an orphaned infant or child found after battle was taken to replace the recent lost of a blood child (often due to disease, illness or the same said war).

    But in many of these cases there was a strong acceptance that though not blood. The tie was beyond blood on a spiritual/soul level.

    My understanding today, is that most of the Scottish Clans look at such in like manner. I am not a scot by blood, but by adoption. And may my Italian and Kossack blood make my Scot heritage equally pround as we stand side by side.

    And let us also not be to far from remembering, that when we fill out all these little bubbles on ethnicities and race. That we should never forget that we all fill in one bubble under race, that is "human".

    "TOUCH NOT THE CAT BOT A GLOVE"

  10. #49
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    Its not just in ancient cultures, its still persists to an exstent today.
    About 20 years ago I spent some time in the deep Sahara with a tribe of Toureg. Learnt a LOT from them about desert survivial and even had the chance to teach them some of my meagre bushcraft skills. One of the greatest adventures of my life, and at the end 'Grandfather' adopted me into the tribe as his 'Grandson'. A truly unexpected honour.
    Martin.
    AKA - The Scouter in a Kilt.
    Proud, but homesick, son of Skye.
    Member of the Clan MacLeod Society (Scotland)

  11. #50
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    I am on the other side of the question, as the birth son of a young Scottish Canadian soldier who was adopted . Knowing my maternal birth name but not my father's Scottish one was likely to be always the case. Through DNA testing in a few formats by more than one lab and genetic matches,I was determined to be a genetic MacRae. I am proud to be of MacRae heritage and am going to order another MacRae tartan kilt.
    Furthermore, how amazing science is when I now even know what line of MacRaes I descend from.
    It's important for an adopted child not to be made to feel different, yet at the same time , recognizing that they may want to recognize their biological heritage in some way if known. eg my name tag on this site is my biological maternal name.

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