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Thread: McQueen

  1. #1
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    McQueen

    Hello.

    Newbie here, my Maternal grandmothers maiden name was Queen, which I gather is the Americanized version of McQueen. My father side are MacNeils, and there seems to be quite a bit of information out there on them. My question is, what I kind of find online of the McQueens is minimal. Does anyone know of any resources? Thanks in advance
    Last edited by Rlail; 4th December 19 at 12:11 PM.

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    One thought is to research the Gaelic bits -- McQueen would be an Anglicization of the "real" name, which would be in Gaelic. For example, check this fabulous resource out: https://www.sloinne.ie/surname/ga/mac-shuibhne/. Keep in mind that Scottish Gaelic came from Ireland and, consequently, the two languages share many similarities.

    Just as my surname, Kennedy, is an Anglicization of the "real" name which would be Ó Cinnéide or simply Cinnéide in modern Irish.

  3. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to jthk For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jthk View Post
    One thought is to research the Gaelic bits -- McQueen would be an Anglicization of the "real" name, which would be in Gaelic. For example, check this fabulous resource out: https://www.sloinne.ie/surname/ga/mac-shuibhne/. Keep in mind that Scottish Gaelic came from Ireland and, consequently, the two languages share many similarities.

    Just as my surname, Kennedy, is an Anglicization of the "real" name which would be Ó Cinnéide or simply Cinnéide in modern Irish.
    Thanks! I appreciate it!

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jthk View Post
    Keep in mind that Scottish Gaelic came from Ireland ...
    Nowadays regarded as debatable

    Anyway, the lowland Kennedys were originally of Western Isles Norse stock so the Gaelic for the surname in Scotland is MacUalraig (Son of Ulrik). Likewise, the MacQueens (Swanson etc.) are also a Norse clan (son of Sven). There is an old thread here
    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f...ue-clan-60513/

    Alan

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    Quote Originally Posted by neloon View Post
    Nowadays regarded as debatable

    Anyway, the lowland Kennedys were originally of Western Isles Norse stock so the Gaelic for the surname in Scotland is MacUalraig (Son of Ulrik). Likewise, the MacQueens (Swanson etc.) are also a Norse clan (son of Sven). There is an old thread here
    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f...ue-clan-60513/

    Alan
    Alan, I'd be interested to hear more about that. If I recall correctly, Scottish Gaelic (as well as Manx) evolved out of Irish which is why they're so incredibly similar to a point. For example, I'm a fluent speaker of Irish and can get on fairly well with a Gaelic speaker -- depending on their own home dialect. And likewise, they can sometimes understand me as well. I do recall that there is a discussion regarding placenames and some archaeological evidence or lack thereof that has contributed to my previously-stated idea to be pushed aside but I'm not terribly familiar with the details. Perhaps I should research that further as my MA in Irish is a few years old.

    With regard to the example you listed, I was only referencing the name/language connection and not necessarily the people's actual origins to which I don't know much about anyway. Thanks for sharing!

    Thanks a million,
    Jonathan
    Last edited by jthk; 6th December 19 at 04:31 PM.

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    Jonathan,
    This might be a start but, as I said, it's all very debatable.
    https://www.electricscotland.com/his...scotsirish.htm

    What seems to be agreed is that the p- and q-dialects diverged in Central/Southern Europe sometime around 1000BC and, whereas both p- and q-Celtic tribes came to mainland Britain, only q-Celts went to Ireland (some say via Iberia). Hence, Scots Gaelic, Manx and Irish were originally almost identical and nowadays are still mutually intelligible allowing for a greater variety of loan words in Gaelic borrowed from Pictish, Norse and Scots. Likewise, the p-Celtic Welsh, Cornish and Breton are very close to each other and have much in common with Gaelic/Irish.

    Alan

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by neloon View Post
    Jonathan,
    This might be a start but, as I said, it's all very debatable.
    https://www.electricscotland.com/his...scotsirish.htm

    What seems to be agreed is that the p- and q-dialects diverged in Central/Southern Europe sometime around 1000BC and, whereas both p- and q-Celtic tribes came to mainland Britain, only q-Celts went to Ireland (some say via Iberia). Hence, Scots Gaelic, Manx and Irish were originally almost identical and nowadays are still mutually intelligible allowing for a greater variety of loan words in Gaelic borrowed from Pictish, Norse and Scots. Likewise, the p-Celtic Welsh, Cornish and Breton are very close to each other and have much in common with Gaelic/Irish.

    Alan
    Alan,

    I find the intellectual debates to be very interesting and entertaining -- trying to piece together histories based on linguistic analysis. I was aware of a lot of that but there's little bits here and there that I welcome to complete my own ever-evolving understanding.

    Thanks! Do you speak Irish or Gaelic yourself?

    Ádh mór,
    Seanachán

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