X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information Houston Kiltmakers Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: learning gaelic

  1. #1
    Join Date
    4th December 16
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    learning gaelic

    I want to start learning Gaelic with my son, who is 8. I prefer to use books, workbooks, and computer applications as opposed to websites. I have not been very successful in my search for these. Any recommendations?

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to styphonthal For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    22nd July 16
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Funny thing, that. I've just begun the journey down that road myself. I have two books on order, but cannot give a recommendation on either as I've not yet received them, nor begun using them ... where the hell is that drone delivery service ...

    In the meanwhile I have turned to video instruction using the YouTube, BBC Alba, Speaking Our Language lessons. There is also a website I'm using in conjunction with the BBC Alba series that breaks the video into bite sized chunks for rapid repetition and review ... kind of how I used the pimsleur series for other languages.

    Books I'm starting with:

    1) Scottish Gaelic in 12 Weeks, Roibeard Ò Maolalaigh
    2) Gaelic Verbs, Colin Mark

    The website I'm using in conjunction with the BBC Alba series is:
    http://www.learngaelic.net/sol/episodes/1-18.jsp

    Sláinte
    Last edited by javankrona; 31st May 17 at 08:51 PM.

  4. The Following User Says 'Aye' to javankrona For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    18th July 07
    Location
    North East Scotland
    Posts
    925
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    javankrona,
    Your link is missing a "p" at the end - should be
    http://learngaelic.net/sol/episodes/1-18.jsp

    I don't know either of the books. You have set yourself quite a challenge. One problem is that spoken Gaelic is very idiomatic and varies from place to place especially as regards colloquial usage and accent. The BBC course is a good middle-of-the-road place to start but I'm afraid you really need to be in close contact with a native speaker to achieve success.

    Ailean

  6. The Following User Says 'Aye' to neloon For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    22nd July 16
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you, neloon

    My heritage is from Argyll. Some of the Canadian census records denote (Gael) parenthetically with the native country being Scotland. I would assume they would have spoken the Dalriada dialect. But being that Scotland has lost so many native speakers, I thought that a middle of the road background would be a good path to begin upon. It is my understanding that the scots and Irish can communicate in Gaelic without much difficulty, so Scot to Scot shouldn't be too bad ... even if one of the scots is American ")

  8. The Following User Says 'Aye' to javankrona For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    2nd July 08
    Posts
    1,365
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't really speak either, but, for example, Irish = Gaelige (with the terminal e voiced), whereas Scots Gaelic = Gaelidh (with the dh pronounced like th). So, even if they can largely understand eachother, some of the differences are apparently fairly basic.

  10. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to O'Callaghan For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Join Date
    9th July 15
    Location
    Banks of the Black Warrior River USA
    Posts
    858
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The LearnGaelic website is very useful, LOTs of lessons...
    Here's my pile:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	151.8 KB 
ID:	31011

    I would recommend the 'colloquial Scottish Gaelic' due to the great website with corresponding audio files for the lessons...
    "We are all connected...to each other, biologically; to the earth, chemically; to the universe, atomically...and that makes me smile." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

  12. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Profane James For This Useful Post:


  13. #7
    Join Date
    18th July 07
    Location
    North East Scotland
    Posts
    925
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by O'Callaghan View Post
    I can't really speak either, but, for example, Irish = Gaelige (with the terminal e voiced), whereas Scots Gaelic = Gaelidh (with the dh pronounced like th). So, even if they can largely understand eachother, some of the differences are apparently fairly basic.
    Sorry, but Scots Gaelic is "Gàidhlig" in Scots Gaelic - pronounced Gaallik .

    Ailean

  14. The Following 5 Users say 'Aye' to neloon For This Useful Post:


  15. #8
    Join Date
    14th July 15
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    420
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Irish Gaelic

    Quote Originally Posted by javankrona View Post
    Thank you, neloon

    My heritage is from Argyll. Some of the Canadian census records denote (Gael) parenthetically with the native country being Scotland. I would assume they would have spoken the Dalriada dialect. But being that Scotland has lost so many native speakers, I thought that a middle of the road background would be a good path to begin upon. It is my understanding that the scots and Irish can communicate in Gaelic without much difficulty, so Scot to Scot shouldn't be too bad ... even if one of the scots is American ")
    First of all, I would like to offer encouragement and support in your journey! Do it! Now, based on the conversation, I'm assuming you mean you'd like to learn Scottish Gaelic ... of which I have none. But I am a fluent Irish Gaelic speaker and yes, I can communicate with Scottish Gaelic speakers but it's touch and go at best -- for me. I speak Donegal Irish (Ulster) and our spelling is similar to some of Gaelic spelling but with regards to pronunciation, I'd say Gaelic speakers are a bit more similar to Munster Irish speakers.

    Anyway, both Scottish and Irish Gaelic are lovely languages and I heartily congratulate you and offer support.

    Best,
    Jonathan

  16. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to jthk For This Useful Post:


  17. #9
    Join Date
    14th July 15
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    420
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by O'Callaghan View Post
    I can't really speak either, but, for example, Irish = Gaelige (with the terminal e voiced), whereas Scots Gaelic = Gaelidh (with the dh pronounced like th). So, even if they can largely understand eachother, some of the differences are apparently fairly basic.
    The Irish word for their native language (Gaeilge) varies between regions. The Munster folks say, Gaelainn and the Donegal folks often say "Gaeilic" but Connacht may say Gaeil-ige. Anyway. Lovely stuff all around.

    Jonathan

  18. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to jthk For This Useful Post:


  19. #10
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,423
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was lucky in that the University I attended offered a course in Scots Gaelic.

    Not that one can attain any semblance of fluency from such, but it served as a great introduction.

    We used Speaking Our Language.

    Our teacher wasn't a Native Speaker. He was a Welsh speaker who subsequently learned both Irish and Scots Gaelic. He evidently was fluent enough- many's the time I heard him conversing with Native Gaelic Speakers.

    In any case it seems to me that given enough hard work and motivation one can become pretty good.

    Case in point was the enthusiastic young man who came to me for uilleann pipe lessons. While he was doing that he was Skyping regularly with a Native Irish Speaker in Connemara. As soon as he finished school here he moved to Ireland, to the Gaeltacht, and AFAIK has been there ever since. According to his Skype teacher he was fluent when he arrived.

    Yes both Irish and Scots Gaelic are plagued (if that's the right word) with numerous dialects, and hard (arbitrary?) choices have to be made as to which dialect will be taught.

    English certainly suffers from this. I've known a number of foreigners who learned British English back home, moved here to the USA, and often found themselves having a hard time understanding what we were saying.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 31st May 17 at 11:10 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  20. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0