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  1. #1
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    27th September 08
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    From Michigan, USA. Currently in Lancashire, UK
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    Alterations Question

    I have asked questions regarding the waist being larger than the hips. I received guidance on this and used it successfully to make 4 kilts for 3 individuals (one guy needed 2). Many thanks for that.

    I am now doing an alteration to make a kilt larger for a guy which seems to be a variation on the larger waist theme. I have done this before for myself and others. The difference this time is that the waist requires more to be let out than the hips. The individual's hips are still the same, but the waist is bigger.

    Following the usual procedure, the apron would wind up larger at the waist than at the hips. Does this mean I should adjust the hip size to allow the apron to taper the correct way? Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    30th November 04
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    Yes - absolutely. You don't want a kilt that is bigger around at the waist than at the hips. So, you need to let the hips out a comparable amount.

    When you're making a kilt for a bigger guy, it helps to add more to the hips than a direct measurement so that the apron hangs straight down from the belly and doesn't pull in under the belly. The easiest way to get the right amount is to roll up a towel and use it to "fill" the space at hip level under the belly. Measure around the hips and the towel in front, and use that measurement for the hip measurement for the kilt. I've made kilts like this that are 5" or more bigger around the towel than a direct measurement over the body at the hips.

    Why does this work? Everyone's butt cheeks stick out farther in the back than the small of their backs do. If someone's belly sticks out in the front, and you use direct measurements for the waist and hips, the kilt will sit like a tilted trash can on the body, slanted forward at the waist and back at the hips. If you do the towel measurement, you have enough in the hips to let you taper the pleats to snug the kilt in to the small of the back and enough in the hips for the kilt to hang straight down at the front.

    If you do this, be sure to put only one buckle and strap on the fringe edge.
    Kiltmaker, piper, and geologist (one of the few, the proud, with brains for rocks....
    Member, Scottish Tartans Authority
    Geology stuff (mostly) at http://people.hamilton.edu/btewksbu
    The Art of Kiltmaking at http://theartofkiltmaking.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    27th September 08
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    From Michigan, USA. Currently in Lancashire, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb T View Post
    Yes - absolutely. You don't want a kilt that is bigger around at the waist than at the hips. So, you need to let the hips out a comparable amount.

    When you're making a kilt for a bigger guy, it helps to add more to the hips than a direct measurement so that the apron hangs straight down from the belly and doesn't pull in under the belly. The easiest way to get the right amount is to roll up a towel and use it to "fill" the space at hip level under the belly. Measure around the hips and the towel in front, and use that measurement for the hip measurement for the kilt. I've made kilts like this that are 5" or more bigger around the towel than a direct measurement over the body at the hips.

    Why does this work? Everyone's butt cheeks stick out farther in the back than the small of their backs do. If someone's belly sticks out in the front, and you use direct measurements for the waist and hips, the kilt will sit like a tilted trash can on the body, slanted forward at the waist and back at the hips. If you do the towel measurement, you have enough in the hips to let you taper the pleats to snug the kilt in to the small of the back and enough in the hips for the kilt to hang straight down at the front.

    If you do this, be sure to put only one buckle and strap on the fringe edge.
    Hi Barb! Thanks for the quick reply. Thanks for the guidance as well. I just needed to check to be sure I would proceed correctly. That is a good trick, measuring around the towel. As I said, I did this while making kilts for 3 guys and it worked like a charm.

    I have made a kilt and piper's plaid for this individual. There was no issue "making" a kilt for him as his waist is not larger than his hips. "Altering" a kilt for him threw me a curve because the apron would work out wider at the waist than the hips.

    Anyway, many thanks for confirming my course of action. As it happens, I had to be able to alter this kilt as I have ordered tartan to make a piper's plaid to match.

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