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Thread: Dirk

  1. #1
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    Dirk

    Test driving the site and looking for a couple answers... When, where and how is a Derk to be carried?
    Socks and boot are under my kilt...

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    I leave the wearing of a Dirk to a Pipe Major in full regalia or to the guy who cuts the haggis at a Burn's dinner.
    Steve Ashton
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    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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    I bought a dirk about 10 years ago, I've only worn it once, wearing White tie at a Burns Night, as Steve said, when doing the Address to the Haggis.

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    The dirk in the real and civilian kilt world is rarely, if ever, worn.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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    In practical application, the above comments apply. There are great photos of our members displaying their dirks among other items of historic importance at home. In some settings (Ren. fairs per example) where "pointy things" are worn to complete a costume of the era. I believe a time is coming where the "once useful tool" will become a show piece viewed on table tops and discussed by folks that are curious of the history.

    I don't own a dirk, as I have no need for that tool.

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    When I was CO of a Canadian Highland unit, I wore a dirk as a badge of office, as did my Sergeant-Major. I am not sure if this is a Canadian highland tradition or not, but most of the other highland COs/RSMs also wore dirks with dress uniform and evening wear. Maybe just a quirk.

    A dirk is usually worn on the right, since the sword is worn on the left and the dirk was traditionally an off-hand (left hand) weapon, drawn from the scabbard by reaching across the body. The dirk is normally hung from the waist belt but sometimes I just used a kilt strap and dispensed with the belt.

    Part of the change of command ceremony was to transfer the dirk to the new Commander for his use during his time in command. In my Regiment, except at perhaps the most formal of events, it would not be proper for anyone except the CO, RSM and certain members of the pipes and drums to wear dirks. So no one else does.

    While attending the "Highland Council" in Calgary this year, an informal annual gathering of highland military folks, I did notice a few dirks worn at the formal dinner, and those mostly by former Honorary Colonels, who probably received them as parting gifts. Other than that, not so much.

    I certainly enjoyed wearing my dirk but now that I no longer have it, I won't likely replace it with one of my own.

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    I have noticed that most of my fellow members of the Scottish American Military Society wear dirks when we are part of a color guard, marching in a parade, or otherwise engaged in official SAMS activities in the SAMS uniform. The one major exception is when we are doing our traditional wreath laying at the memorials in the Mall in downtown District of Columbia. The Park Service rules forbids weapons on the memorial sites. To keep to the subject of how to wear dirks, we always wear them on the right, suspended from the dirk belt (aka kilt belt).
    Geoff Withnell

    "My comrades, they did never yield, for courage knows no bounds."
    No longer subject to reveille US Marine.

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    Wondering if the OP would mind if we moved this to the weapons sub-forum.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Parish priest, retired Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour and clarity. Theologian, teacher, leader, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts and souls and a firm believer in dignity, decency, and duty. A proud Sinclair.

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    Welcome to XMTS


    Here are my answers to your questions "When, where and how is a Dirk to be carried?"



    (1) The dirk is carried rarely.

    (2) A dirk would be carried at a specific formal event where you need one like a Burns Night Supper for use during "The Address to a Haggis" or perhaps to a wedding (if you are the groom) to cut the wedding cake. Preferably while wearing a formal doublet with lace at your throat and cuffs.

    (3) I might be wrong here, but I am pretty sure it is carried on a separate (weapons) belt

    During my 10+ years of kilt wearing at a variety of functions I have worn one exactly once



    (A dirk looks wonderful with period garb, but the fantastic outfit my friend Dale is wearing isn't exactly normal clothing)

    My opinion after wearing one was that though it looked cool and was appropriate for this Burns Night (in which I was the Master of Ceremonies), the truth was it was a pain to carry about and got in the way a lot.


    As I noted above, probably the very best and most appropriate time to wear one is when wearing a period costume...like when attending a Renaissance Faire when dressed like this



    (Even then I generally skip it because it just gets in the way)

    A nice dirk is a wonderful thing to have, but not so much to wear.

    Cheers

    Jamie
    Last edited by Panache; 26th October 16 at 07:19 AM.
    -See it there, a white plume
    Over the battle - A diamond in the ash
    Of the ultimate combustion-My panache

    Edmond Rostand

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dileasgubas View Post
    When I was CO of a Canadian Highland unit, I wore a dirk as a badge of office, as did my Sergeant-Major. I am not sure if this is a Canadian highland tradition or not, but most of the other highland COs/RSMs also wore dirks with dress uniform and evening wear. Maybe just a quirk.

    A dirk is usually worn on the right, since the sword is worn on the left and the dirk was traditionally an off-hand (left hand) weapon, drawn from the scabbard by reaching across the body. The dirk is normally hung from the waist belt but sometimes I just used a kilt strap and dispensed with the belt.

    Part of the change of command ceremony was to transfer the dirk to the new Commander for his use during his time in command. In my Regiment, except at perhaps the most formal of events, it would not be proper for anyone except the CO, RSM and certain members of the pipes and drums to wear dirks. So no one else does.

    While attending the "Highland Council" in Calgary this year, an informal annual gathering of highland military folks, I did notice a few dirks worn at the formal dinner, and those mostly by former Honorary Colonels, who probably received them as parting gifts. Other than that, not so much.

    I certainly enjoyed wearing my dirk but now that I no longer have it, I won't likely replace it with one of my own.
    Are you familiar with the Story/Jounal of Volunteer Sgt Thompson of the 78th Highland Regiment? It would seem that at least in that unit that wearing a dirk by NCO's was a symbol of being on duty, similar to the wearing of sash and gorget by officers. Anyway he loaned his dirk to another NCO who ended up using it to save his life when being attacked by a subordinate.

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