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  1. #1
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    11th July 11
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    Some dirks in progress

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Still quite a bit of work to do but progressing slowly. I'm pretty excited about the large one!
    May you live as long as you want and never want as long as you live

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  3. #2
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    13th May 05
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    Native Texan, now located in W. KY/TN
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    Beautiful workmanship. I like these earlier styles as well.
    My Clans: Guthrie, Sinclair, Sutherland, MacRae, McCain-Maclachlan, MacGregor-Petrie, Johnstone, Hamilton, Boyd, MacDonald-Alexander, Patterson, Thompson. Welsh:Edwards, Williams, Jones. Prussian ancestry.

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  5. #3
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    Thank you kind Sir! I hope the fella that ends up with it enjoys!
    May you live as long as you want and never want as long as you live

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  7. #4
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    26th September 05
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    Very nice! I hope there is a resurgence in traditional dirk making. We need more makers so that reenactors don't end up using one of the horrid "Historic" styles that are both wrong in pattern, but also lacking a soul!

  8. #5
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    25th December 15
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    I like the second one (the one with the holes in the blood-groove). The artistry on the grip is beautiful.
    Regards,
    Tom

  9. #6
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    15th March 12
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    Lovely work!
    St. Andrew's Society of Toronto

  10. #7
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    15th August 16
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    Tacoma, WA, USA
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    I love the craftsmanship!
    I've never seen a perforated fuller before. It makes sense structurally as a way to reduce weight without losing stiffness. I think it also makes the blade more aesthetically interesting, though that's a matter of taste. Are there historical examples of this practice, or is it a modern, post drill-press, improvement?
    Why be normal when you can be yourself?

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac View Post
    I love the craftsmanship!
    I've never seen a perforated fuller before. It makes sense structurally as a way to reduce weight without losing stiffness. I think it also makes the blade more aesthetically interesting, though that's a matter of taste. Are there historical examples of this practice, or is it a modern, post drill-press, improvement?
    I've found a few mostly ranging from 17-18th centuries. Here's an example.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    That one was my first and based heavily on Evans. I pray to hold a sheet in that man's wind one day!
    May you live as long as you want and never want as long as you live

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  13. #9
    Join Date
    26th September 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac View Post
    I love the craftsmanship!
    I've never seen a perforated fuller before. It makes sense structurally as a way to reduce weight without losing stiffness. I think it also makes the blade more aesthetically interesting, though that's a matter of taste. Are there historical examples of this practice, or is it a modern, post drill-press, improvement?
    Here is one with piercings,

    http://www.nms.ac.uk/explore/collect...?item_id=15432

    Also if you have access to Wallace's "Scottish Swords and Dirks" look at item 52, which I have not yet been able to "Find" on the above listed website as collection numbers have changed a bit since the publication of the book.

  14. #10
    Join Date
    11th July 11
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    You can see the making of the one you liked in a post I made a while back
    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f...86/index3.html
    May you live as long as you want and never want as long as you live

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