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  1. #11
    Join Date
    4th March 04
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    Sonoma Co, CA
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    Though I have heard the superstition about "selling," not giving, a knife, I prefer to see a different tradition as precedent: when a father gives his son a sword on becoming a commissioned officer, with every confidence that there will be no severing of the relationship and no expectation of compensation.

    In a knife publication I remember seeing a drawing of a chipped edge, jagged knife with the caption "If a knife tried to cut our friendship it would look like this." I believe it would be sign of trust in a friendship to expect that no gift of a knife would jeopardize it.
    "...the Code is more what you'd call 'guidelines' than actual rules."

    Captain Hector Barbossa

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to kiltimabar For This Useful Post:


  3. #12
    Join Date
    14th March 12
    Location
    North Baltimore Ohio, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chas View Post
    I have always been an advocate of giving a boy a pocket knife. Practically all the rights of passage have disappeared from modern life. So much so that young people invent their own. Unfortunately these usually involve bad decisions and illegal substances.

    But give a boy a knife; lay down the rules of use, when/when not, how, safety, cleaning, sharpening; put it in his hands and tell him that his first steps to being a responsible citizen start now. All the onus and responsibility is now on his shoulders. There are very few boys in this world that do not step up, given the opportunity.

    I think that this is a good idea. It does not matter that the knife might not be a 'real' knife. It is what the knife represents to the boy that matters, not what it is. Allowing a boy to own a knife is an act of trust and most importantly the boy knows that it is.

    Yes, I think it is a good idea.

    Regards

    Chas
    I received my first knife when I was eight (on old timer single bladed lock blade pen knife. Long since lost to time). I got my first fixed blade (all metal boot dagger) at ten. It wasn't much bigger than my current sgian. I have no children as of yet (here's hoping though), I did however pass on the tradition with my nephew (with the blessing of his father and mother). He was diagnosed with ADHD and explosive disorder and most thought I was daft to hand him a blade of any type. He is turning sixteen this year and is my prize student in the Medieval European Martial arts class that I teach. he doesn't know it yet, but as soon as he is 16, I intend to name him an assistant trainer. He stepped up because some people believed in his ability to make the right choices.
    Gloria Patri! Thither Yond! Jeremiah! Do-lang Do-lang! (All things I have shouted in a charge.) http://www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com

  4. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Sir Didymous For This Useful Post:


  5. #13
    Join Date
    9th April 13
    Location
    Gilbert, Arizona
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    My Fathers dear friend, Ed Hill gave me a beautiful Buck knife when I graduated high school, 30 years ago.
    Although he has since passed, every time I pull it out I think of what a great man he was and funny childhood memories.

    Since then I have given 3 Buck knives as graduation presents, I enjoy this tradition... thanks Ed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chas View Post
    I have always been an advocate of giving a boy a pocket knife. Practically all the rights of passage have disappeared from modern life. So much so that young people invent their own. Unfortunately these usually involve bad decisions and illegal substances.

    But give a boy a knife; lay down the rules of use, when/when not, how, safety, cleaning, sharpening; put it in his hands and tell him that his first steps to being a responsible citizen start now. All the onus and responsibility is now on his shoulders. There are very few boys in this world that do not step up, given the opportunity.

    I think that this is a good idea. It does not matter that the knife might not be a 'real' knife. It is what the knife represents to the boy that matters, not what it is. Allowing a boy to own a knife is an act of trust and most importantly the boy knows that it is.

    Yes, I think it is a good idea.

    Regards

    Chas

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