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  1. #1
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    making a billie kilt for Pastor Gwen

    I'm taking on a totally different project...me and my big mouth again!

    Pastor Gwen from church is a wonderful friend and the difference between her waist measurement and her hip measurement is two inches. She's not stout, she just simply isn't curvy.

    She wants a billie kilt like this:



    I am concerned about that upper strip of fabric. It will be cut on the bias (kills me to waste tartan like that, but the customer gets what she wants!). Is that going to look odd, if Gwen has minimal "curvature"?

    Thoughts?
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

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  3. #2
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    Coincidentally I'm in the middle of a similar project! Larger and longer than pictured, but the same idea. I don't think the small taper will be an issue. My taper is significantly larger (10 inches from top to bottom of a 7-inch deep bias strip) and I am making a fake kilt with side seams on the yoke, side zipper, and just pleated fabric sewn all the way around the lower yoke edge. I did curve those side seams vs making a straight cone shape.

    Dealing with the bias fabric, I've used both iron on interfacing and seam tape to stabilize side seams and waist edge. This is my test garment in fashion tartan before I decide what to do with Wildcat, The Tartan That Shall Not Be Named, and some other nice pieces.

    BTW I'm making the pleats in RevK pattern.
    Last edited by sydnie7; 16th June 15 at 08:47 PM.
    Proudly Duncan [maternal], MacDonald and MacDaniel [paternal].

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  5. #3
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    Ok the bias strip is a yoke, the difference in measurements is not an issue at all (forget the word tapering on this project)
    Any shaping is done via the shape of the yoke pattern and on the side seams.
    It will be a 3 piece yoke, 1 x back, 2 x front (1under apron, 1over apron)
    Stability is always an issue with bias yokes, so.....
    - you need a lining for the yoke. Basically you cut each piece x 2 = 6
    - however... Cut the outside 3 on the bias of the fabric. Cut the inner lining pieces on the straight of grain (either fashion fabric or another fabric) this helps to prevent the front fabric stretching too much.
    - lay out the outer yoke pieces trying to match the pattern/stripes at the side seams (it's hard and may not work)
    - if you are using a good wool fabric I wouldn't recommend iron on interfacing/fusing
    -you can underline with silk organza or a medium weight sew in interfacing but horsehair as used on a men's kilt will be too stiff.
    -for added strength and stability use seam tape inside the waist seam when sewing up.
    It's the fit of the yoke that does the work on a Billie Kilt. So...
    - make a couple of toiles in cheap cotton or whatever is to hand to get the fit & shape right.
    - check out women's dress patterns for a suitable yoke to save some time and hassle drafting a pattern. Just cut the front yoke twice and use that as under & over apron, adjusting the width as needed.
    - you 'may' be able to add some darts for shaping in the yoke depending on the stripe of the fabric and how you want it to look.
    Once the yoke is fitted, everything else should be fairly simple.
    Depending on the depth of the yoke you may or may not have to sew down the top of the pleats. That's really a fashion decision for the client.

    Best of luck
    LG

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  7. #4
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    I had a ton of fabric so just cut two yoke pieces, front and back. Side seams matched up perfectly without even trying (have undoubtedly cursed myself on all future projects LOL). I used iron on interfacing because this is a relatively lightweight wool, will likely sew in future versions. I had thought of making a two-piece rear yoke in future, to save on fabric, and run the zipper down the center back -- installing it on the very curved side seams was not fun, and didn't turn out great. But I will likely not "tuck in" so the zipper should stay hidden on this one.

    I have the yoke done and will pin some fabric to it to determine what finished length I want. This fabric doesn't have a great kilting selvedge (huge tenterhook holes) but I'm going with it for expediency. Once pleated, holes are not as evident and again this one is a trial, my version of making a muslin except I'll be able to wear it to Vista this month if it comes out well.

    Drafting the yoke took less time than searching for a pattern that could be adapted. Again, I'm not making a wrapping garment just a solid yoke with pleated fabric sewn around the bottom edge.
    Proudly Duncan [maternal], MacDonald and MacDaniel [paternal].

  8. #5
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    Lady Grey, that post was THE BOMB....if for nothing else, I learned what a "yoke" is!

    The tartan is red Robertson polyester viscose. I'd already figured out that the yoke would have to be two layers...tartan on the outside and either tartan or some other fabric on the inside but it makes perfect sense to cut the inner layer NOT on the bias for stability. Thanks. I'll probably use a straight-weave poly-cotton in red.

    I could look for a pattern. Yoked, pleated skirts aren't that uncommon, I would guess, but my gut feeling is to take Gwens measurements again, stare at her hard and thoughtfully, again and cut it out on instinct. Heh. Live dangerously.

    I'd already figured on a 3-piece yoke. Ha! I must not be too dumb! OK, seam tape on the side seams. The Luminous Joan can help me with that, I've never used seam tape before.

    OK, what's a toile ? I'm guessing that it's a "practice piece" or "practice pieces" which I then fit together and strap on Gwen to make sure I didn't muck it up too much. Hmmmmm... can't hurt.

    Thoughts on interfacing, knowing that it's PV? If I was to use it, I'd probably use iron-on interfacing and put it on the straight-grain fabric, hoping that fabric+interfacing would take any stretching load, but would it be better to stabilize the bias-aligned fabric?

    =================

    Believe it or not, when I made the simple skirt for Angela, to model the Wildcat Tartan in, that was my very first zipper. I put it in the center-back, on the center joining seam. I got mildly disapproving looks from Joan but an "OK" when it was done. Angela kept the skirt so I must not have messed it up too badly!
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

  9. #6
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    ETA: I'll wait until I see how mine fits before offering instructions LOL
    Last edited by sydnie7; 17th June 15 at 01:46 PM.
    Proudly Duncan [maternal], MacDonald and MacDaniel [paternal].

  10. #7
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    A difference of 2 inches on a bias cut yoke can be achieved simply. Cut the fabric to the larger measurement and then stitch the waist edge to something stabilising which is the size you want, or you could sew it on a machine with the top tension loose and draw it in two inches by pulling on the bobbin thread. Ease the gathering along the length until there is no bulging. I would imagine that a lot more then two inches could be eased in, and the fabric pressed into shape.

    Bias cut fabric drives some people mad but I love it for its malleability.

    Anne the Pleater :ootd:
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  11. #8
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    Alan
    Ah the vagaries of language
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toile Yep a test or trial run in cheap fabric BUT it needs to be of similar weight & weave, thus a practice yoke out of a stretchy old TShirt is no good. Try an old sheet.
    Seam tape: two methods
    On the outside https://books.google.com.au/books?id...stband&f=false
    On the seam: http://itch-to-stitch.com/slam-dunk-...nts-up-part-2/

    Yoke pattern: no need to worry about one made for pleats, you will pleat how you want and attach (be careful if the yoke is curved at the bottom)
    Here's an ok tutorial on drafting a yoke: http://andreasnotebook.com/the-flirt...-free-pattern/
    Hope that helps
    LG

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  13. #9
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    I have discovered that..

    1. the PV was not woven symmetrically on the loom and
    2. the sett is twice as big as I thought it was.

    My own fault. If I'd LOOKED AT IT more carefully before cutting, it would have been fine.

    Ergo, I'm waiting on another yard and a half from Marton Mills so I can make it right. I'm pretty grumpy about it. Pastor Greg might be getting a Robertson tartan vest out of the leftovers, of which there is a lot. I'm never making another billie kilt again. The fabric waste is atrocious.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

  14. #10
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    The Marton Mills fabric has arrived. Now I just need some TIME.
    [COLOR="Purple"][B]Order of the Kilted Lebowskis[/B][/COLOR]
    [COLOR="Blue"][I][SIZE="2"]Formerly Tasteful Aesthete[/SIZE][/I][/COLOR]

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