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  1. #11
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    From the photos your kilt with the white band at the top has been modified, and badly, over time. The fabric straps are not original nor are the buckles. (Nor is how the buckles are sewn on original.)
    The white top band is not original and the liner has been changed at some time. The original label was probably on the liner as perhaps the hand written name and rank.

    The fabric appears to be classic fabric from the 1950's. The overall construction is similar to that used by Gordon & Sons of that period.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  3. #12
    Join Date
    15th July 17
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    Scotland
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    Thanks Steve. Appreciate your comments. Iím going to switch the buckles and fasteners for leather. It fits me well and looks great on so Iíll enjoy wearing it all the same.

  4. #13
    Join Date
    15th July 17
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    Although on checking a Cameron Highlanders kilt I have, dated 1956 and made by Thomas Gordon and Sons, the wool is completely different. Far softer and smoother.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48į 25' 47.31"N 123į 20' 4.59" W
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    I wil caution you about one small thing.

    The kilts from this period may well be sewn with cotton thread. The white theads seen in the Fell stitching are sort of the give away.

    Linen thread was in very short supply and very expensive in the UK during 10 years after the end of the war. The synthetic threads we use today were almost unknown.
    But cotton thread was available and relativly inexpensive.

    But cotton has a nasty habit of deteriorating and giving way all at once.

    Here is a military kilt made by Gordon & Sons, the royal warrant holder at the time, in 1947. The Tartan fabric is good but the inner construction of the stabizer and interfacing sewn with cotton has failed.



    To put this kilt back into service required removing and replacing all of the stabizer and interfacing. Re-stitching of the entire Fell area. Repair to the apron facings and over stressed fabric. And finally replacment of the inner liner.

    Here is the same kilt having a test fit just before the green top band was put back on.



    Total time to repair this kilt was over 100 man hours.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 29th April 18 at 02:09 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  6. #15
    Join Date
    15th July 17
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    Scotland
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    Hi Steve,

    Are you saying it may be to fragile to wear? It could very well be cotton as you suggest. Seems strong enough but you’d know better.
    Last edited by Jags; 1st May 18 at 11:41 AM.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    No, I did not say it was fragile.

    I said that the kilt may have been sewn with cotton thread and that may, or may not, lead to a failure of the internal construction elements.

    This is not the Fell stitching, but what is hidden from view behind the liner.

    The only way to tell is to look under the liner which would require it being removed.

    This is what you could find under the liner. This is a linen stabilizer strip. You can see that the linen is worn and crumpled but intact. The cotton thread holding the stabilizer however has failed completly.

    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  8. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  9. #17
    Join Date
    15th July 17
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    Oh I see. Very interesting. Iím only intending on switching the straps and buckles though. Not planning on removing the lining. Thatís too much of an undertaking for me!

  10. #18
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    Then please remember. When you sew straps and buckles on, they are sewn all the way through the outer, Tartan fabric, and anchored to the stabilizer strip.

    If you do not anchcor to the strip you will weaken the kilt and it can fail much more easily and/or quickly.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  11. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  12. #19
    Join Date
    15th July 17
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    Scotland
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    Ah, gotcha. Iíll be careful to do it right.

    Many thanks!

  13. #20
    Join Date
    26th September 05
    Location
    Indiana
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    I use linen thread for most applications in my 18th Century sewing. The time saved using cotton that does not have to be waxed is lost in its lack of longevity.

  14. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Luke MacGillie For This Useful Post:


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