X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    EdinSteve is offline Membership Suspended for repeated rule violations.
    Join Date
    3rd September 18
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    359
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Military recruiting in the Highlands 1739 - 1815

    Came across this interesting paper on Highland soldiers - http://theses.gla.ac.uk/680/1/1995mackillopphd.pdf - which goes into a lot of detail of recruitment at the time. One interesting piece of information was that recruits from Ireland at the time exceeded those from the Highlands. The appendices are particularly interesting, giving recruits by clan and numbers of deserters among other things.

  2. The Following 5 Users say 'Aye' to EdinSteve For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    5th August 14
    Location
    Oxford, Mississippi
    Posts
    4,685
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Beginning on page 375, the occupations of the recruits interests me and fits this forum even better. Having been in the military, support on base and in the field (clothes, food, arm supply and manufacture, etc.) is vital to any success. Not everyone is a front line soldier.

    I'll take the time to read the rest this weekend. Thanks for the link.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,642
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Beginning on page 375, the occupations of the recruits interests me and fits this forum even better. Having been in the military, support on base and in the field (clothes, food, arm supply and manufacture, etc.) is vital to any success. Not everyone is a front line soldier.

    I'll take the time to read the rest this weekend. Thanks for the link.
    What is particularly interesting is the proportion of former weavers, second only after Day Labours, who joined the Army. That was possibly and indication of the loss of tradition outlet for tartan cloth; Highland Clothes which had been banned under the Act of Proscription.

  5. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,171
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    What is particularly interesting is the proportion of former weavers, second only after Day Labours, who joined the Army. That was possibly and indication of the loss of tradition outlet for tartan cloth; Highland Clothes which had been banned under the Act of Proscription.
    Were they not able to weave plain-coloured cloth instead? I assume people still needed cloth, whether it was tartan or not. And perhaps even more so after Proscription, since they'd need to purchase non-tartan clothing that met the new requirements.

  7. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Tobus For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,642
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    Were they not able to weave plain-coloured cloth instead? I assume people still needed cloth, whether it was tartan or not. And perhaps even more so after Proscription, since they'd need to purchase non-tartan clothing that met the new requirements.
    They were of course able to weave plain cloth but of course that would be in direct competition with cloth manufactured elsewhere, eslecially as the industrial revolution started:

    1733 - The Flying Shuttle

    1764 - The Spinning Jenny

  9. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    18th July 07
    Location
    North East Scotland
    Posts
    883
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    What is particularly interesting is the proportion of former weavers, second only after Day Labours, who joined the Army. That was possibly and indication of the loss of tradition outlet for tartan cloth; Highland Clothes which had been banned under the Act of Proscription.
    A couple of quotations from the thesis suggests that the "weavers" were mostly linen weavers who were having a hard time.

    "The decline in the British mainland's linen industry likewise dominated much of the debates on instances of Lowland emigration in the 1770s. Thus, in February 1774, when a group of five hundred, consisting mostly of weavers left from Paisley, there was no connection made with landlords or estate policies."

    "In 1774, much attention in Scotland was focused on the House of Commons as it sat as a committee to consider the state of the linen trade within the British mainland and Ireland. On 17 May 1774, it was noted that, within Ireland, it was the more commercialised northern and Protestant sections of the country which were leaving. It was understood that 30 000 weavers had emigrated in consequence of the decline in the linen trade."

    Alan

  11. #7
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,642
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by neloon View Post
    A couple of quotations from the thesis suggests that the "weavers" were mostly linen weavers who were having a hard time.

    "The decline in the British mainland's linen industry likewise dominated much of the debates on instances of Lowland emigration in the 1770s. Thus, in February 1774, when a group of five hundred, consisting mostly of weavers left from Paisley, there was no connection made with landlords or estate policies."

    "In 1774, much attention in Scotland was focused on the House of Commons as it sat as a committee to consider the state of the linen trade within the British mainland and Ireland. On 17 May 1774, it was noted that, within Ireland, it was the more commercialised northern and Protestant sections of the country which were leaving. It was understood that 30 000 weavers had emigrated in consequence of the decline in the linen trade."

    Alan
    Alan,

    Interesting, very little is known about linen weaving in the rural Highlands and one must wonder how much of it actually went on given that the flax wold have had to be imported from the Lowlands or further afield for the most part, unlike wool.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    18th July 07
    Location
    North East Scotland
    Posts
    883
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes. But, of course, a fair proportion of the conscripts were not from the Highlands or even Scotland.

    Alan

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0