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  1. #1
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    feeling special is not OK

    OK I'm interested in the gang's take on this....

    I had a little tiff with the lady again about kilt-wearing...this was, oh about six weeks ago. I told her that among aother reasons like comfort, plain ol' fun, and a what-the-hell attitude, , one of the reasons I wore a kilt was because it made me feel a little bit "special". You know how it is, you step out in a kilt and you know that you'll probably be the only person around who's wearing one. The ladies will look, a couple of them will flirt... the guys will either smile at you and say something nice or will walk by pretending not to notice, but if you look at their eyes (they haven't moved their heads) their eyes are following the sporran...

    Yeah, says I to the Missus...wearing a kilt makes me feel a little bit different, a little bit "special". I think everybody should get to feel that way now and then, you know?

    OK, apparently *someone*...wife won't tell me who, said " that's not a good reason for wearing a kilt. "Feeling special" should come from INSIDE a person, not from other people."

    Anyway, the conversation went from there to what was "masucline" or not. I made the point that choosing what I wanted to wear and wearing it and damn the nay-sayers was a lot more masculine than wanting to wear a kilt and not doing it because I was afraid what other people would think....but I digress.

    What do you all think about that "feeling special should come from inside" comment vis a vis kilt-wearing?

  2. #2
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    Well ultimately the one real control we have in our lives is how we react to others. Sure it is nice to say you should be happy with yourself and not need any outside feedback to give you any sense of well being...but that crap. The fact is for millions of years our pack nature has desired a sense of acceptance and love from our "pack" and we still to this day do it, though some more than others. It isn't wrong to want to feel special...Basically what she is saying is you should get no joy from someone reacting positivly to you. doesn't make sense to me...

  3. #3
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    Most men can't put on a kilt in the first place. Just being one of the men that can is enough proof to masculinity.

  4. #4
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    I have always felt that I was special. When I started donning the kilt, it was just an extention of who I really am.
    Glen McGuire

    A Life Lived in Fear, Is a Life Half Lived.

  5. #5
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    heritage...

    Alan,

    For those of us of Scottish heritage, the kilt is the visible symbol of a special sense of pride in our ancestors and their accomplishments.

    Cheers,

    Todd

  6. #6
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    3rd August 05
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    Wearing a kilt makes you feel attractive. Not always sexually attractive, but attractive in the sense that people notice you and are interested in you when you walk into a room- something a lotta lotta women have happen all our lives because in the crudest sense... 'we've' got boobies and 'you' like them. It can be a bit more refined than that, but basically women spend a lot of their lives being looked at, checked out, and chatted up, and most of the time there is a sexual component to it, even if only in pretense, like the flirty banter between my gay friend and I.

    I think she's having a hard time with that aspect of it- that a male can (and should!) be attractive and the center of attention, and she doesn't always need to be. I'm not saying she consciously feels this way, but if I had less self-esteem or was more worried about my own attractiveness, I certainly would be miffed at all the people who talk to my husband and fawn over him and all that stuff when he's wearing a kilt or talking about his motorcycle or doing something with skiing and ignore me. (As it is, I just dump the baby in his lap and run off to dance or something if I get too bored.) I've dragged him to things where I've been the one who's engaged and charming, and he's 'just' my husband, too. But I don't think it's the female's rightful place to be put up on some social pedestal as the most attractive thing in a gathering!

    It's just second nature to a lot of women, especially women who think their social standing depends on their attractiveness, to evaulate everyone in the room and who/what their attention is drawn towards. In this case, it's you, and she doesn't like it. That 'feeling special' is attractiveness, nothing more, nothing less, and it does come from inside of you- and is enhanced by what you choose to wear rather than caused by it. Perhaps if you bring up this idea, she'll recognise her own feelings and be able to deal with them, instead of focusing on your clothes.

  7. #7
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    You can't just make yourself feel special. Your special feeling inside directly comes from the reactions of others. If people didn't react differently to you in a kilt, it would be just as if you were wearing trousers, and there would be no reason to feel special.

    Andrew.

  8. #8
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    I can kinda see what she's saying... kinda... I've posted here about my wife before, I believe, Alan, you repsonded to a few posts with some supportive words.

    As far as self esteem goes, I agree. Self esteem can ONLY come from inside. I learned that a long time ago. Thats why its called SELF esteem. Can other people help it or hurt it? Of course. But they cannot fix it. If you have crappy self esteem, all the compliments in the world wont fix it. And if you have great self esteem, all the put-downs in the world wont hurt it.

    Do I feel special in a kilt? Of course. I like the looks, the compliments, etc. Do the put downs discourage me? No way. (On a side note, the ONLY put downs I've heard yet are FROM my wife). I put on a kilt, I know I look good. I dont need someone to tell me I do. If someone says "Hey fag nice skirt" so what. I know I look good, they arent gonna hurt me. However, when I get a compliment, even though I am confident and feel good... it helps! Heck, I cant help but smile and say thanks, and feel good inside.

    So, in my opinion, she's halfway right... you should feel 'special' inside first, but dammit... the attention does make that 'special' feeling a lot stronger, doesn't it?

  9. #9
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    27th June 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by KiltedBishop
    Basically what she is saying is you should get no joy from someone reacting positivly to you. doesn't make sense to me...
    hmmn, this is deep and troubling.

    So then we have to discuss joy and your response to the flattery...but it looks like it's generally been covered.

    Could suggest it's either that or the rockabilly cat comes out, that seems to quiet people down up here. But then, I don't really have that issue.

  10. #10
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    13th September 04
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordDamax
    As far as self esteem goes, I agree. Self esteem can ONLY come from inside. I learned that a long time ago. Thats why its called SELF esteem. Can other people help it or hurt it? Of course. But they cannot fix it. If you have crappy self esteem, all the compliments in the world wont fix it. And if you have great self esteem, all the put-downs in the world wont hurt it.

    Do I feel special in a kilt? Of course. I like the looks, the compliments, etc. Do the put downs discourage me? No way. (On a side note, the ONLY put downs I've heard yet are FROM my wife). I put on a kilt, I know I look good. I dont need someone to tell me I do. If someone says "Hey fag nice skirt" so what. I know I look good, they arent gonna hurt me. However, when I get a compliment, even though I am confident and feel good... it helps! Heck, I cant help but smile and say thanks, and feel good inside.

    So, in my opinion, she's halfway right... you should feel 'special' inside first, but dammit... the attention does make that 'special' feeling a lot stronger, doesn't it?
    We think much alike on this.

    I enjoy the attention. Yes, I admit it, I do. "Freedom" yeah, well, two-thirds of the time that I wear a kilt, I'm wearing it to work. I wear them with heavy-duty grundies in the name of modesty in the workplace and not getting fired should something untoward happen. So "Freedom" isn't an issue for me. Kilts are fun, I like 'em, and I wear them a bit tongue-in-cheek, 'cause life is way too short to take everything so bloody serious, you know?

    I also have no problem with my self esteem. I know I'm smart, reasonably attractive, musically talented, interested in science and nature, and articulate. I don't have to "prove" those things to anybody.

    Same goes for being masculine, and the Mrs. agrees. She instantly agreed that deciding what I want to do and doing it without being overly concerned with what others will think is a lot more "masculine" than the action of putting pants on. So it's not the "masculine" issue any more. And remember, this is the same woman that tore into the obnoxious guy, just weekend before last, eh?

    Anyway, Lord Damax, I discern a large difference between "self esteem", which is what I think my unknown commenter is talking about, and "feeling special". Clearly, you do, as well..

    **************************************************
    Shay, in part you are right. My wife is a particularly sober individual. She's a scientist, was valedictorian of her high school class, had a GPA *above* 4.0 in college (A-plusses counted for 4.3 grade points) and so on. She's very Type A and excels at all the type A kind of things...balancing the checkbook, never forgetting anappointment, always being on time, etc. etc.

    She also works out incredibly hard at her dance/aerobics studio. The result of that is that for a woman of 48 years old, she has a figure that most gals twenty years her junior would kill for. When she was in Jr. High School she was borderline anorexic. Anorexic...lots of exercise... Can you say... "control issues"?

    More than the attractiveness thing, I honestly think what's coming into play here is that I am doing something, yet again, that she does not "control".....wearing kilts. It's outside of her accepted "norm" and I've never done it before. She's not good with change. She has always leveraged her type A skills into power in the relationship, because I severely lack those type A skills. All of a sudden her Type A skills aren't controlling something, and her husband is doing something new and unexpected.

    You know, it doesn't work to let one partner control the power in a relationship too much. It CAN'T work, or else there's no relationship, you know? If I always roll over and die and let her run the show, then there's a serious loss of respect that goes along with that, and there's relationship hell to pay for it. It'd be the same if she was a dishrag and I held all the power. So in the interests of maintaining a healthy relationship with the woman I love, every now and then I fight hard for something that's important. In fact, the issue itself may not be THAT important, but I MAKE it important, just on principle, in the name of balance.

    It sounds crazy to instigate conflict in the nature of relationship health, but it works for us. The tiny little amount of relationship stress we go through over kilts is nothing...*NOTHING*...compared to what we'd be going through (and have gone through in the past) if I didn't draw a line sometimes and refuse to give in. Kilts is one of those lines, and she "deals" with it, but it's tough for her sometimes.

    Too Bad. Kilts aren't the only "line" BTW, it's just the one I talk about here on XMarks.

    But I digress rather far from the original intent of this thread, which is about "feeling special" when wearing a kilt.

    Shay, your ideas are pretty interesting, though. Until I started wearing kilts I never in a million years could tell if a woman thought I was interesting or attractive. I was blind to it, or maybe it just wasn't happening. Not that I *worried* about that, you know? I just didn't think about it, it was a non-issue. Honestly, I don't think any women paid any attetion, actually, but maybe I was clueless. It's just that now the whole issue is is more noticeable, because a couple of days a week I've got a kilt strapped around me ****, and people notice that.

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