X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    21st November 17
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Irish tartan kilt store identification help

    Hi, looking at buying a used Irish tartan kilt off of Facebook marketplace. The label on the kilt says The Kilt only with rectangular label with a celtic scroll around the outside. It says 34-38 which are us sizing. Does anyone know of the store that sells this kilt? Looking to get some more info before purchasing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
    Posts
    5,111
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the label looks about like this -



    What you are seeing are one of the mass produced kilts made in Sailkot, Pakistan.

    The size is given in US pants size. This may or may not be the same if you put a tape measure around yourself.

    Notice please that it says "Designed in Scotland" but not where it is actually made.

    The fabric may be anywhere from 100% acrylic to an acrylic/wool blend.

    This particular one says 100% acrylic wool. Whatever that means.



    You can find these on ebay and in many shops that order them in bulk and re-sell them at a huge markup. This one sells wholesale for $12.00 US dollars.

    Many people get quite down on these, but really, they are perfect for what they are. If you have "go to Scotland or Ireland and buy a kilt" on your bucket list and want something for about the same as a souvenir t-shirt - or you want something for occasional wear to the pub or once a year to your local Highland Games or Celtic Festival, then they are perfect.
    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 19th November 18 at 11:05 PM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  3. The Following 4 Users say 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    17th June 15
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    604
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	download.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	7.0 KB 
ID:	35613

    I believe this is the label being described. I think The Wizard's explanation also fit this label.

  5. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Wareyin For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,482
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And this is what the whole Sialkot-made ensemble looks like



    It's funny how carefully they word the label ("designed in Scotland") and also many of their Ebay listings.

    It would help so much if Scotland required country of origin labels- the tourists in Edinburgh would buy less tat.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  7. #5
    Join Date
    3rd September 18
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    142
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    It would help so much if Scotland required country of origin labels- the tourists in Edinburgh would buy less tat.
    I’m not sure that the majority of tourists are sufficiently discerning to differentiate between this kind of tat and a quality item, particularly when the price differential can be hundreds of pounds.
    While certain products such as Scotch whisky have Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status nothing similar exists for kilts as far as I know. Perhaps if there was an “Armani kilt” or “Jimmy Choo” ghillie brogues they would be protected against cheap imitations but as things stand it is simply a free for all.
    One final consideration is the fire resistance of these cheap acrylic fabrics, particularly when sourced from countries where regulations covering this can be more lax or even non-existent.
    Last edited by EdinSteve; 20th November 18 at 08:36 AM.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
    Posts
    5,111
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just a few further comments if I may.

    A Highland Games heavy event athlete is required to compete in kilt. This type of kilt serves those who toss telephone poles for a living very well. If damaged they can be replaced without breaking the bank.

    A few years ago the utilikilt was the "gateway" kilt. In the days when many thought that some "right" to wear Tartan was a common misconception. These inexpensive kilts serve a similar function for those who are unsure about this whole kilt thing. For those who don't know if they will like wearing a kilt or who wonder if they will be laughed at or branded as odd or different -

    For those who will wear their purchse only once or who only want an "outlander" or "braveheart" costume -

    For those who want to wear a kilt for rough activities like painball, mudder obstical courses, or tri-atheletes -

    These may be the perfect option. But I will caution - While I believe in "truth in advertising" - "Protected Designation of Origin" would end up with most of the advertisers here no longer able to make kilts and going out of business. This forum would probably have to shut down. And far fewer people would be able to afford or be seen in kilts very quickly.
    There was, and may still be for all I know, a movement among a few of the Scottish makers to regulate or legislate the making of kilts. It is possible that this could end up to be a sort of "cutting off your nose to spite your face" type of thinking.

    We have already seen the cheapening of the kilt with shortcuts in manufacturing in an attenpt to compete with the imports. Would it not be preferable to stress the quality and craftmanship, to be proud of producing the best you are capable of producing, instead of lowering your quality to the level of competing with the tat?

    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  9. The Following 6 Users say 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Join Date
    3rd September 18
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    142
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    These may be the perfect option. But I will caution - While I believe in "truth in advertising" - "Protected Designation of Origin" would end up with most of the advertisers here no longer able to make kilts and going out of business. This forum would probably have to shut down. And far fewer people would be able to afford or be seen in kilts very quickly.
    I doubt very much whether any such PDO would ever see the light of day and the current movement to leave the EU makes this even less likely as without its regulations everything would be a free for all. Melton Mowbray pies from America, Scotch whisky from India, Stilton cheese from Nigeria and so on all become a possibility then. Meanwhile Champagne etc. remain protected.
    I read somewhere “ Buy cheap, buy twice” which makes a lot of sense. I posted a photo of a cheap kilt here a while back and such a kilt very quickly becomes a shapeless, ill fitting garment. Unless you have direct family experience of kilt-wearing then a site like this provides essential advice and, hopefully, can help to direct people towards the best choices for kilts and other items of highland dress.

  11. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to EdinSteve For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
    Posts
    5,111
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are many current "protected designation of origin" names out there. Even three that you name.

    The use of the word "Scotch" to denote a whisky made within the country of Scotland vs the usage of "Single Malt" for whisky produced elsewhere is already protected by Scottish Whisky Regulations (2009).

    Use of the word Stilton is limited to cheeses produced in three counties but strangely now excludes the town of Stilton itself.

    The "Melton Mowbray Pork Pie" name is protected by "Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association" to pork pies made within the Melton region.

    And whether or not the word "Kilt" is, or is not granted protection, is not really the current problem that I am seeing.

    Imagine my surprise when a customer came in to buy accessories for the kilt he had just received from one of the largest and most well known names among the Scottish houses.



    He was so proud of his kilt which he had purchased (and for which he paid a premium price for) because it was advertised as, "fully handmade 8 yard kilt built to last you and your family a lifetime. The fully handmade kilt is made with 100% worsted wool and is entirely hand-stitched here in Scotland. This is a traditional, authentic Scottish kilt that can be passed down generations to come."

    I really did not have the heart to tell him the truth.



    Here in my shop we prefer to take a different approach. Our customers have knicknamed what I do as "The Kilt-a-cation". Just as I do here on this forum, I teach.

    The first question I ask a customer is "What do you want to do in your kilt?". Then I begin to pull off of my rack some examples of the different types and styles of kilt.

    I have an actual current RRS kilt, my personal Barb T. kilt, a Pakistani made kilt which I purchased on the Royal Mile of Edinburgh, my personal Utilikilt, three of the various otions available on the Contemporary kilts I make, and four others from various Scottish houses. I start by describing what goes into the making of the various types of kilts. I use the different kilts to illustrate these different methods of construction.
    I have a strip of fabric that I use to show the difference between Pleated to Sett vs Pleated to Stripe. I show them the difference between box pleats, knife pleats, etc.
    And I show them what is hidden behind the liner of a well made kilt, and what the internal construction elements do and why they are important to the life of a kilt.



    I then let the customer make their own decision on what type of kilt he wants and can afford. I have found from experience, that teaching, instead of spouting misleading advertising, (and backing up my words with examples) is greatly appreciated.

    I now have an informed kilt buyer. Even if one of my kilts is not what they are looking for, or can afford, they can at least make an informed decision. Even if my teaching means that they will be going somewhere else.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  13. The Following 12 Users say 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  14. #9
    Join Date
    21st May 08
    Location
    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,610
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    We have already seen the cheapening of the kilt with shortcuts in manufacturing in an attenpt to compete with the imports. Would it not be preferable to stress the quality and craftmanship, to be proud of producing the best you are capable of producing, instead of lowering your quality to the level of competing with the tat?
    I couldn't agree more!

  15. The Following User Says 'Aye' to ThistleDown For This Useful Post:


  16. #10
    Join Date
    7th October 07
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wareyin View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	download.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	7.0 KB 
ID:	35613

    I believe this is the label being described. I think The Wizard's explanation also fit this label.
    I bought this (Gold Brothers) brand as a starter kilt - they are good introductions to Kilts at a knock-down price, but YouTube videos showing their flammable properties made me go and buy genuine ones after a while. Any mention of "Authentic" in the description line makes me run a mile now These sites from Sialkot also steal other people's photos and purport their 'tat' to be as well constructed as in photos of well made wollen kilts
    Kilted Technician!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0