X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    24th July 18
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    56
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Late 1940s kilt question.

    I found a military kilt made in the 1940s for sale. My question is related to the thread used in a kilt of this vintage. Doesn't the cotton thread in these degrade over time? I want to be cautious about buying a kilt this old because I wouldn't want it to fall apart when I wear it. Perhaps I should just buy a new one instead. What do you all say?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,537
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is the kilt actually sewn with Cotton? Different makers may have used different threads at different times. If the kilt was made in the UK anytime during the war and up to 5-6 years after the war, due to rationing and post war shortages the kilt would be sewn with anything that was available. Cotton thread was rare in some places, and expensive in others.
    I had one older gentleman relate to me his post war experiences in the garment industry. He said that some sewing was done with silk thread because, while expensive, silk was available while Cotton could not be found at any price.
    Another older kiltmaker told me that they used the warp yarns from the center strip to sew the Fell and linen from a saddle shop to sew the interfacing.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  3. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    24th July 18
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    56
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Late 1940s. I can get the same tartan if I pick up a newer (1980-90s) Royal Regiment of Scotland surplus kilt. There is something appealing about buying a kilt made so close to the WWII era. What is nicer is that the original wearer of the kilt has almost exactly my measurements. His bum was about 3 cm larger than mine.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,416
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Curtis Bias View Post
    I found a military kilt made in the 1940s for sale. My question is related to the thread used in a kilt of this vintage. Doesn't the cotton thread in these degrade over time? I want to be cautious about buying a kilt this old because I wouldn't want it to fall apart when I wear it.
    That's an interesting question. I've seen and handled dozens, maybe hundreds, of vintage military kilts, and owned and worn a few (back when I was much thinner!) and I don't think I've ever seen one falling apart as you describe.

    Ditto Victorian and WWI tunics and other sewn things, I can't remember seeing them fall apart either.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  6. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    28th April 13
    Location
    SE QLD, Australia
    Posts
    1,519
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Curtis,
    my heirloom kilt, MacKenzie Seaforth, dates back to WWII and doesn't have a loose thread anywhere and the pleats as as sharp as the day they were made. I did have to replace the fabric tapes that hold the buckles and I had the aprons reduced when I lost 4 inches on my waist but that didn't affect the pleats. These kilts were made to last.
    Regards, Sav.

    "The Sun Never Sets on X-Marks!"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0