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  1. #1
    Join Date
    8th September 16
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    Virginia
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    Wait is finally over...new kilt arriving next week my US Coast Guard Tartan Kilt.....

    I am a US Coast Guard Veteran, and plan to join the local SAMS in the very near future. Before I joined I wanted to have the US Coast Guard tartan on a kilt, to represent the USCG properly. The fabric rights for the 16 ounce are very hard to obtain, and I had to wait. After contacting the USCG Pipe Band, who has the rights, I was approved an allotment of material for a kilt when they had the next tartan woven in 16 ounce. I waiedt for about two years, and finally was advised in January, the mill was going to weave the material in the near future. Wheels set in motion.



    As you notice very similar to the Hamilton Tartan, this design is by no coincident. The design of the United States Coast Guard Tartan was inspired by the family Tartan of Alexander Hamilton, the founder of the Revenue-Marine, and the 'father' of the modern day U.S. Coast Guard. Each color of the Tartan signifies the following:

    Red: Symbolizes the courage and sacrifice of the men and women of the Coast Guard and its predecessor services, and their families, in war and peace for more than 200 years.

    White: There are 10 threads of white representative of the original 10 Revenue Cutters commissioned by Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton in 1790. They were: the Massachusetts, Scammel, Active, Eagle, Diligence, Argus, Vigilant, Virginia, South Carolina and General Greene.

    Blue: Symbolizes the seas and skies plied by cutters and aircraft of the Coast Guard as they carry out their missions to serve and protect.

    One of the largest contributors in making the Coast Guard Tartan become a reality was Andrew Anderson, CDR, USCG (Ret). On May 1, 2002, then-Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral James Loy, approved the U.S. Coast Guard Tartan. This set the wheels in motion. Material was ordered from Scottish woolen mills and Kilts were made. Alexis Malcolm was the Kilt Maker commissioned to make the first Coast Guard Kilts.

    Finally, material was delivered in late April and now the kilt is on it way. It will be an honor to wear this tartan, Semper Paratus.

    Just thought you would like to know what was behind this tartan.
    Last edited by CollinMacD; 6th June 18 at 09:31 AM.
    Allan Collin MacDonald III
    Grandfather - Clan Donald, MacDonald (Clanranald) /MacBride, Antigonish, NS, 1791
    Grandmother - Clan Chisholm of Strathglass, West River, Antigonish, 1803
    Scottish Roots: Knoidart, Inverness, Scotland, then to Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

  2. The Following 6 Users say 'Aye' to CollinMacD For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    5th August 14
    Location
    Oxford, Mississippi
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    Great news Collin. Can't wait to see the finished kilt. Thanks for your service and honor to continue the historic memory of the Coast Guard.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    14th August 15
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
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    Post some photos please including when you have joined SAMS.




    Quote Originally Posted by CollinMacD View Post
    I am a US Coast Guard Veteran, and plan to join the local SAMS in the very near future. Before I joined I wanted to have the US Coast Guard tartan on a kilt, to represent the USCG properly. The fabric rights for the 16 ounce are very hard to obtain, and I had to wait. After contacting the USCG Pipe Band, who has the rights, I was approved an allotment of material for a kilt when they had the next tartan woven in 16 ounce. I waiedt for about two years, and finally was advised in January, the mill was going to weave the material in the near future. Wheels set in motion.



    As you notice very similar to the Hamilton Tartan, this design is by no coincident. The design of the United States Coast Guard Tartan was inspired by the family Tartan of Alexander Hamilton, the founder of the Revenue-Marine, and the 'father' of the modern day U.S. Coast Guard. Each color of the Tartan signifies the following:

    Red: Symbolizes the courage and sacrifice of the men and women of the Coast Guard and its predecessor services, and their families, in war and peace for more than 200 years.

    White: There are 10 threads of white representative of the original 10 Revenue Cutters commissioned by Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton in 1790. They were: the Massachusetts, Scammel, Active, Eagle, Diligence, Argus, Vigilant, Virginia, South Carolina and General Greene.

    Blue: Symbolizes the seas and skies plied by cutters and aircraft of the Coast Guard as they carry out their missions to serve and protect.

    One of the largest contributors in making the Coast Guard Tartan become a reality was Andrew Anderson, CDR, USCG (Ret). On May 1, 2002, then-Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral James Loy, approved the U.S. Coast Guard Tartan. This set the wheels in motion. Material was ordered from Scottish woolen mills and Kilts were made. Alexis Malcolm was the Kilt Maker commissioned to make the first Coast Guard Kilts.

    Finally, material was delivered in late April and now the kilt is on it way. It will be an honor to wear this tartan, Semper Paratus.

    Just thought you would like to know what was behind this tartan.
    Aye Yours

    Jim

  5. #4
    Join Date
    8th September 16
    Location
    Virginia
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    Arrive an hour ago, fits perfect, waiting for jacket (grey) to go along with it. LOVE IT. Will post photo when I get the occasion to wear it. CHEERS.
    Allan Collin MacDonald III
    Grandfather - Clan Donald, MacDonald (Clanranald) /MacBride, Antigonish, NS, 1791
    Grandmother - Clan Chisholm of Strathglass, West River, Antigonish, 1803
    Scottish Roots: Knoidart, Inverness, Scotland, then to Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

  6. The Following 6 Users say 'Aye' to CollinMacD For This Useful Post:


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