X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information Houston Kiltmakers Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 86
  1. #21
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
    Location
    Dorset, on the South coast of England
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I watched the recent series of 'Good Omens' on TV - the Neil Gaiman Terry Pratchett collaboration, and noticed that there was a very weathered indeed tartan used for the kilts of angels being kitted out to fight the last battle.

    I have the cd now and keep meaning to freeze the scene and see if it is possible to make out which tartan - if it is an actual tartan, it is.
    Good excuse to watch it again...

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,876
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pleater View Post
    I watched the recent series of 'Good Omens' on TV - the Neil Gaiman Terry Pratchett collaboration, and noticed that there was a very weathered indeed tartan used for the kilts of angels being kitted out to fight the last battle.

    I have the cd now and keep meaning to freeze the scene and see if it is possible to make out which tartan - if it is an actual tartan, it is.
    Good excuse to watch it again...

    Anne the Pleater
    Do post a screen grab if you can.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    23rd August 19
    Location
    Midlands UK
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My personal taste lies with the Macdonald of Clanranald ancient, simply as it's more pleasing to my eye. Then again, i'm not one for over flashy and bright colouring in clothing
    Last edited by kilted Mnementh; 19th March 20 at 11:52 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,509
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To muddy the waters even more, House Of Edgar has their "muted" range, neither dark like "modern colours" nor pastel like "ancient colours" nor earth-toned like weathered/reproduction colours.

    Here's MacDonald in House Of Edgar's Muted Range



    Compare the colours to Black Watch in Ancient Colours



    and Black Watch in Weathered/Reproduction colours

    Last edited by OC Richard; 22nd March 20 at 02:26 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  5. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  6. #25
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,509
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry to dredge up this thread, but I was going through old catalogues and such and I found a pamphlet by D C Dalgliesh LTD titled The Story Of Reproduction Tartans.

    It gives more details about the story seen on their website about how their Reproduction Colour scheme came about:

    The story of Reproduction Tartans is the tale of two fragments, the first a piece of cloth no larger than a table napkin, the other a vital nine months in the history of Scotland.

    It began in the autumn of 1946 when a peat-gatherer seeking fuel on Culloden Moor dug out an old piece of cloth, which after the most searching examination proved to be a MacDonald tartan. The colours and sett were noted to be somewhat different to that in vogue but this was hardly surprising when it was decided that this piece of cloth was certainly 200 years old. It may have well been worn by a MacDonald then fighting in defence of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, in his quest for the throne of Great Britain.


    (Then follows four paragraphs telling the story of the 1745 rebellion.)

    Judge then the importance of the peat-gatherer's find and with what care it was cherished. Here indeed was the key to much lost and sketchy knowledge and to D C Dalgliesh, who obtained this piece of cloth on loan, among conditions laid down were two, namely that it be insured for 2,000 pounds and that it be lodged nightly locked in a safe.

    Patient and intensive research into colours, sett, and weave followed, and as a result D C Dalgliesh LTD have produced a range of Reproduction Tartans which are authentic in colour and design to those worn in 1745 and before.

    Woven in pure wool, the colourings of these tartans offer a soft muted effect entirely reminiscent of the days when vegetable sources such as lichen, moss, and alder bark provided the dyer with his raw materials.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 13th April 20 at 04:27 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  7. #26
    Join Date
    26th December 19
    Location
    Prince Edward Island
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wonder which MacDonald tartan it was. I descend from the Glenaladale MacDonaldís who are a cadet of Clanranald. Itís believed that Alexander MacDonald 6th Laird of Glenaladale wore the tartan while he fought with Prince Charlie. A fragment of this tartan came to Prince Edward Island in 1772. Long story short, a cousin of mine talked with Peter MacDonald and he reveawed the tartan. You can see some of the tartan on my profile. Itís a beautiful red and an asymmetrical tartan. Not sure if this might have been part of the tartan the farmer found or not.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    21st March 17
    Location
    San Diego, USA
    Posts
    799
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by GlenaladalePiper View Post
    I wonder which MacDonald tartan it was. I descend from the Glenaladale MacDonaldís who are a cadet of Clanranald. Itís believed that Alexander MacDonald 6th Laird of Glenaladale wore the tartan while he fought with Prince Charlie. A fragment of this tartan came to Prince Edward Island in 1772. Long story short, a cousin of mine talked with Peter MacDonald and he reveawed the tartan. You can see some of the tartan on my profile. Itís a beautiful red and an asymmetrical tartan. Not sure if this might have been part of the tartan the farmer found or not.
    It really is a beautiful tartan.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5352.JPG 
Views:	7 
Size:	200.4 KB 
ID:	38542
    Descendant of the Gillises and MacDonalds of North Morar.

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to FossilHunter For This Useful Post:


  10. #28
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,876
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by GlenaladalePiper View Post
    I wonder which MacDonald tartan it was. I descend from the Glenaladale MacDonaldís who are a cadet of Clanranald. Itís believed that Alexander MacDonald 6th Laird of Glenaladale wore the tartan while he fought with Prince Charlie. A fragment of this tartan came to Prince Edward Island in 1772. Long story short, a cousin of mine talked with Peter MacDonald and he reveawed the tartan. You can see some of the tartan on my profile. Itís a beautiful red and an asymmetrical tartan. Not sure if this might have been part of the tartan the farmer found or not.
    The Glenaladale was certainly not the alleged piece from Culloden as it hadn't been rediscovered by 1946.

    When the Glenaladale tartan was first reproduced, in the 1970s, it was an asymmetric pattern based on the fragment but that is now shown to be an incorrect interpretation, the pattern is symmetrical - MacDonald of Glenaladale

  11. #29
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,876
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Sorry to dredge up this thread, but I was going through old catalogues and such and I found a pamphlet by D C Dalgliesh LTD titled The Story Of Reproduction Tartans.

    It gives more details about the story seen on their website about how their Reproduction Colour scheme came about:

    The story of Reproduction Tartans is the tale of two fragments, the first a piece of cloth no larger than a table napkin, the other a vital nine months in the history of Scotland.

    It began in the autumn of 1946 when a peat-gatherer seeking fuel on Culloden Moor dug out an old piece of cloth, which after the most searching examination proved to be a MacDonald tartan. The colours and sett were noted to be somewhat different to that in vogue but this was hardly surprising when it was decided that this piece of cloth was certainly 200 years old. It may have well been worn by a MacDonald then fighting in defence of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, in his quest for the throne of Great Britain.


    (Then follows four paragraphs telling the story of the 1745 rebellion.)

    Judge then the importance of the peat-gatherer's find and with what care it was cherished. Here indeed was the key to much lost and sketchy knowledge and to D C Dalgliesh, who obtained this piece of cloth on loan, among conditions laid down were two, namely that it be insured for 2,000 pounds and that it be lodged nightly locked in a safe.

    Patient and intensive research into colours, sett, and weave followed, and as a result D C Dalgliesh LTD have produced a range of Reproduction Tartans which are authentic in colour and design to those worn in 1745 and before.

    Woven in pure wool, the colourings of these tartans offer a soft muted effect entirely reminiscent of the days when vegetable sources such as lichen, moss, and alder bark provided the dyer with his raw materials.
    I'd be happy to be proved wrong but this is just more marketing nonsense in my opinion. Where is this piece, what made it a MacDonald tartan, who decided that the piece of cloth was certainly 200 years old? No museum or academic of the time examined this tartan so the whole claim needs to be regarded with extreme caution.

  12. The Following User Says 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  13. #30
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    14,278
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    I'd be happy to be proved wrong but this is just more marketing nonsense in my opinion. Where is this piece, what made it a MacDonald tartan, who decided that the piece of cloth was certainly 200 years old? No museum or academic of the time examined this tartan so the whole claim needs to be regarded with extreme caution.
    Rightly or wrongly, I think most of us in Scotland who have a modest interest in tartans think along these lines.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  14. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Jock Scot For This Useful Post:


Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0