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Thread: Sporran Chain

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted redleg View Post
    Go to mykiltkaer.com click on belts and sporran straps you can get a well made leather kilt belt [black or brown] for eleven bucks.
    I get a "site can't be reached" error. Did you perhaps mean mykiltmaker.com ?

  2. #12
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    I have a sporran strap from USA Kilts which works just fine and a pair of sporran hangers that I bought with my kilt belt, from a craftsman who is unfortunately "on hiatus" at this time. Both work fine for nearly any event that isn't super-formal.

    I have also improvised a sporran chain from a metal chain dog leash. It is much stronger and less likely to snag than the cheapo chains often sold with sporrans. And it is very adjustable, since I can click onto any link with the spring-loaded piece that is supposed to attach to the dog's collar. Certainly not as nice as Father Bill's L&M chain, but a darn sight cheaper, which was important at the time I picked it up.

    Andrew

  3. #13
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    Sporran chains

    My first (and only) sporran came with the chains, and the cheapest hooks I've ever seen.
    I'm contemplating removing those cheapo hooks and replacing them with heaver split rings like on a key chain. They will be hidden behind sporran anyway.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    Meant in a friendly and humourous way, I'm sure, but it's a real sore point for a lot of us up here in the Frozen North, so tread softly my friend!
    The dollar is actually Czech in origin, I believe, but was widely used in British North America and, of course, was adopted by both Canada and the US as their currencies; something like 20 other nations, mostly members of the British Commonwealth, also use the dollar

    Keep it light, chaps.

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  6. #15
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    I seem to recall "dollar" deriving from "thaler," but I could be mistaken.

    But I'm happy with any name, as long as stores will accept my payment.

    Andrew

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  8. #16
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    To return to the OP, I would make one point and that is to examine the chain closely, particularly the clips, to ensure that no sharp ragged edges have been left on manufacture as these will rapidly damage a kilt apron as a result.

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  10. #17
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    I heard or read somewhere that if you had a cheap chain you could solder the crack in the link shut so it would not harm the kilt, just another option if you like DIY projects.

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richrail View Post
    I purchased and brown and black leather sporran belts from Wyvern Leatherworks. Great to work with him and nice quality also. I highly recommend him. https://www.wyvernleatherworks.com/
    I have brown and black leather sporran belts from Donnie, as well, and am very pleased with them.
    Allen Sinclair
    Eastern Region Vice President
    North Carolina Commissioner
    Clan Sinclair Association (USA)

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  13. #19
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    Going back in time, there were only plain leather sporran belts.

    There are over 50 kilted portraits in The Highlanders Of Scotland (1860s) and only two men can be seen to be wearing chains.

    I only wear leather belts myself, except in the pipe band where "chains are required".

    I like the old long-link chains, above is a 100-year-old one in Sterling Silver (which I never wear) and below is a modern chrome-plated one (which I wear in the band)



    Here's an Edwardian sporran with its long-link chain



    I'm not sure, but the recent pipe band fad for ornate chains may have got started by Ian Grant (Edinburgh) who makes elaborate sets with matching logos on everything including on the chains



    I think it's because nearly all competition bands nowadays wear waistcoats without jackets and the chain is visible... and pipe bands are always looking to add a bit more bling...

    Last edited by OC Richard; Yesterday at 06:50 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  14. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    To return to the OP, I would make one point and that is to examine the chain closely, particularly the clips, to ensure that no sharp ragged edges have been left on manufacture as these will rapidly damage a kilt apron as a result.
    Hear, hear!

    I have seen Pakistani-made chains with exactly those jagged bits on the back tear up beautiful kilts.

    Traditional Scottish-made chains are smooth as glass on the back.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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