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  1. #1
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    Old Doublet on eBay

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/QUALITY-SCO...gAAOSwHDdcdpjW

    Attachment 36534

    Might be a nice old jacket for some lucky person; 40L.

    Not mine, just highlighting a find.

    Frank
    Drink to the fame of it -- The Tartan!
    Murdoch Maclean

  2. #2
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    Yes I was looking at that, an interesting thing! It's one of numerous "doublet" variations that existed in the 2nd half of the 19th century, but was re-introduced in the 1920s.

    Andersons claimed to have invented it, in the 1920s. They called it "the Kenmore doublet". But it can be seen in the 1860s in The Highlanders Of Scotland.

    The main difference between the old doublet and Anderson's "Kenmore" doublet is that doublets nearly always had "gauntlet" cuffs, while the Kenmore had the slash cuffs of the Prince Charlie coatee. But doublets are seen with a variety of cuffs (plain, gauntlet, slash, pointed) in Highlanders Of Scotland.

    Likewise you'll see quite a variety of collar and lapel treatments, usually with open lapels but sometimes with standing collars.

    Here's a similar doublet c1870 but with the usual gauntlet cuffs.



    Here's a doublet with slash cuffs in The Highlanders Of Scotland.

    Last edited by OC Richard; 14th March 19 at 06:27 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  3. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    EdinSteve is offline Membership Suspended for repeated rule violations.
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    Looking at these images seems very much apposite to the discussion in this thread - http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/s...90#post1373090 - and it can be seen that what many nowadays regard as formal dress was, in fact, daywear at one time.

  5. #4
    Join Date
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    In Victorian times the distinction between Day Dress and Evening Dress wasn't as absolute as it became in the first quarter of the 20th century when Highland Dress got more orderly and systematic.

    Partly it's because long hair sporrans were worn for all sorts of Highland Dress (civilian Day, civilian Evening, military) and partly it's because quite plain jackets were often worn for Day and Evening alike.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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