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  1. #1
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    No kilts - yes pipes!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vztRqe_CHC0

    sorry, meant no kilts, yes pipes.
    Last edited by Balaamsass51; 3rd January 19 at 05:58 PM.
    Insperata Floruit! - Flourished Unexpectedly!

    KABOOM; Kilted Christians; Kilted In Carolina; Matt Newsome Kilt Owners Group; R Kilts are Awesome; SEKS - The Great Southeastern Kilt Society; The Order of the Dandelion

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  3. #2
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    I learned throat singing (toning, my lessons were called in the 1980's) and never imagined they would sound this good with pipes and drums. I am glad to hear that someone found a use for a cleansing (for my well being) exercise.

    It's also good to know that there are people better at throat singing than I am. I could make this video crash.

  4. #3
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    Throat singing combines well with many instruments. I have sung with flutes from small to a Czechoslovakian
    shepherd's flute six and a half feet long. With bluegrass instruments. And of course didgeridoos of various tonalities.
    Blessed to sing in the temples at Machu Picchu, Sterkfontein Caves, and in the Altai Mountains near the conjunction
    of Altai, China and Mongolia. The cultural intersection of throat singing, North Carolina, Mississippi, and the 80s,
    however, nearly boggles even my wyrd. I love it.
    Last edited by tripleblessed; 3rd January 19 at 09:57 PM.

  5. #4
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
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    Typo in title fixed.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tripleblessed View Post
    The cultural intersection of throat singing, North Carolina, Mississippi, and the 80s,
    however, nearly boggles even my wyrd. I love it.
    I appreciate music from anywhere, anytime, of any kind. Your adventures in throat singing humble me and I can see the attraction to "tone" in the sites you mentioned.

    To muddle the issue further, I tried using the instrument (pictured below) along with my toning. I had limited success because of lung control (am still a smoker after 50 years). I still think the combined sounds would work. I imagine the vibrations of jubilation (like the OP's video provides).
    Last edited by Tarheel; 4th January 19 at 05:16 AM.

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    To muddle the issue further, I tried using the instrument (pictured below) along with my toning. I had limited success because of lung control (am still a smoker after 50 years). I still think the combined sounds would work. I imagine the vibrations of jubilation (like the OP's video provides).
    That's a Jew's harp isn't it - occasionally used in Scotland
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jew%27s_harp

    Alan

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  10. #7
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    Very interesting sound they've produced there! I'm not generally a fan of so-called "mashups" of different ethnic traditions, but this one works particularly well.

    I believe the bowed instrument he's playing is a Morin khuur, otherwise known as a horsehead fiddle. It's a traditional Mongolian instrument that pairs well with the bagpipes, in terms of the way it's played with a drone to accompany the melody. (Side note: this is one of the reasons I was drawn to playing traditional fiddle music to begin with. I love the sound of double-stops and drone strings.)

    I'm not very knowledgeable on bagpipes, though. I see several types being played. These are obviously not Great Highland Bagpipes. What are they? I'm especially curious about the one where the drone pipes were swinging underneath the bag.

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    Typo in title fixed.
    Merci, monsieur.
    Insperata Floruit! - Flourished Unexpectedly!

    KABOOM; Kilted Christians; Kilted In Carolina; Matt Newsome Kilt Owners Group; R Kilts are Awesome; SEKS - The Great Southeastern Kilt Society; The Order of the Dandelion

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    Very interesting sound they've produced there! I'm not generally a fan of so-called "mashups" of different ethnic traditions, but this one works particularly well.

    I believe the bowed instrument he's playing is a Morin khuur, otherwise known as a horsehead fiddle. It's a traditional Mongolian instrument that pairs well with the bagpipes, in terms of the way it's played with a drone to accompany the melody. (Side note: this is one of the reasons I was drawn to playing traditional fiddle music to begin with. I love the sound of double-stops and drone strings.)

    I'm not very knowledgeable on bagpipes, though. I see several types being played. These are obviously not Great Highland Bagpipes. What are they? I'm especially curious about the one where the drone pipes were swinging underneath the bag.
    The underslung drones caught my eye as well. Many areas have their own version of pipes, and since the clip says it's
    drums and pipe music from Latvia, perhaps these are a local variant?

    Being a a fan of most types of music, especially classical and bluegrass, the violin/fiddle is a favorite sound. I was taught
    by my throat singing teachers that the bow came west with the Mongol Horde sent out by Genghis Khan. The bow was
    strung with the horsehair running between the strings of the instrument. this allowed it to be hung from a saddle without separation of the two, to prevent loss of bow. By the time the Horde reached the gates of Vienna, Genghis was gone and
    Kublai was Khan. A rumor arrived from home that he had died, and that funeral games would be held. Having missed the games for Genghis, they decided to abandon the siege of Vienna and go home for the games. Thus we don't speak a
    Turkic language and we inherited both the bow for stringed instruments and the stirrup. Cannot speak to the veracity
    of this info, but I have seen writings which seem to confirm.

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  15. #10
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfnkCbwRSas

    Also traditional with throat singing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2noGZtDtlq8

    The second clip has annoying commentary, but the performance demonstrates the interconnection of jaw harp, throat singing, and
    horse culture. The melding of Celts and horses happened (apparently) where the mountains meet the steppes, and much has traveled
    west to us. Bagpipes are common in many cultures along the migration paths.
    Last edited by tripleblessed; 4th January 19 at 07:30 AM.

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