X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: Color Question

  1. #21
    Join Date
    25th October 17
    Location
    Antwerpen, Belgium
    Posts
    22
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Karl R View Post
    Since I could not see the bottom of the jacket in your photo, I assumed that the jacket was a kilt jacket. Is it a jacket cut for a kilt, or is it meant to be worn with slacks?.
    Can you explain how a jacket cut for a kilt differs from another not cut for a kilt, and
    can blazer not cut for a kilt be worn on top of a kilt

  2. #22
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,757
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A jacket cut for trousers will have the bottom of the jacket end just about the bottom of the buttocks. To hide the pucker from the trouser legs.

    A jacket cut for a kilt will be cut shorter. About the crest of the buttocks. As we don't have trouser legs we don't want to hide the pleats.
    A kilt jacket will also have a cut-away to go around the sporran.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 11th July 19 at 08:29 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  3. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  4. #23
    Join Date
    25th October 17
    Location
    Antwerpen, Belgium
    Posts
    22
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    A jacket cut for trousers will have the bottom of the jacket end just about the bottom of the buttocks. To hide the pucker from the trouser legs.

    A jacket cut for a kilt will be cut shorter. About the crest of the buttocks> As we don't have trouser legs we don't want to hide the pleats.
    A kilt jacket will also have a cut-away to go around the sporran.
    I understand the cutting and the difference,
    I used a pied de poule blazer on a casual kilt for a dinner dress code casual or blazer city dress

  5. #24
    Join Date
    10th January 19
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Jacket length for kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by DerekvG View Post
    Can you explain how a jacket cut for a kilt differs from another not cut for a kilt,
    Kilts (with the exception of Utilikilts and some casual kilts) are worn much higher than normal pants are. Pants are worn a few inches below the navel, while kilts are worn slightly above the navel. Therefore, kilt jackets will be cut shorter than regular suit blazers, to match the higher waistline.

    If you're looking at a photo of a jacket on a hanger, compare the length of the sleeve to the length of the body of the jacket. If the body hangs a few inches below the length of the sleeve, then it's a blazer meant to be worn with pants/slacks. If the body is cut off a few inches above the length of the sleeve, then it's a kilt jacket meant to be worn with kilts. (Certain jackets, like Prince Charlies, are cut even higher.)

    Quote Originally Posted by DerekvG View Post
    can blazer not cut for a kilt be worn on top of a kilt
    It can, but it's going to look a little strange. For example, I found this article where the author (shown in the photo) is wearing a kilt with a blazer meant for pants. (His kilt is a more modern design by 21st Century Kilts with pockets.)

    It looks a little strange. Not only is there a mismatch between the length of the jacket and the rise of the kilt, but the blazer is also meant to hang straight down, and the kilt underneath is meant to flare outward.

    There will be some exceptions where blazers designed for pants will work with kilts. Decades ago (1950s and earlier) men often wore high-waisted pants. Some of the jackets from that era were cut higher, to match the higher waist of the pants. If you find one of those jackets/blazers, it probably will look fine with a kilt.
    Trying to look good on a budget.

  6. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Karl R For This Useful Post:


  7. #25
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,757
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am sorry but from the way you worded the question I assumed that you were asking about the cut of the jacket and not the pattern of the fabric that kilt is made from.

    Pied de poule or houndstooth fabric is a very acceptable, the old school classic fabric for a kilt Jacket.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  8. #26
    Join Date
    7th September 14
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    1,134
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Threads like these are some of my favorites here. First off, IMO, if you're wearing a kilt you already have some style and flare. Intuitively you gather up things that go with it and maybe start a discussion about colours or cut or style .. and some really get into it and others say they never really think about it - yet both camps and between - be they learned, spouse guided, trained or self-studied - look great! In the end, always some good insight and guidance.

    Happy kilting

  9. #27
    Join Date
    25th October 17
    Location
    Antwerpen, Belgium
    Posts
    22
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    I am sorry but from the way you worded the question I assumed that you were asking about the cut of the jacket and not the pattern of the fabric that kilt is made from.

    Pied de poule or houndstooth fabric is a very acceptable, the old school classic fabric for a kilt Jacket.
    Actually I was talking about the cut, your answer was the correct and expected input, thank you , you were not mistaken, however your input about pied de poule fabric is very valued too.
    I wasn'tttalking about the colour, but about the. Cut
    In the picture with the blue jacket IMG_20190714_112203.jpg I think the jacket is not what is called a blazer on the continent but it looks to me like the jacket of a 2pc or 3pc suit
    My pied de poule blazer IMG_20181029_125802.jpg is cut differently. There is about 3" or 4" between the cuff an the bottom seam. While in the blue jacket there is more then double
    Although my blazer is not cut for a kilt specifically it fits more your description of such a cut then the blue jacket
    Am I right in making that conclusion
    Last edited by DerekvG; 14th July 19 at 02:40 AM.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,171
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm posting this from my phone, so apologies if the image size is not ideal. But a kilt jacket generally has a body length shorter than the sleeves. If the body is longer than the sleeves and falls below the fell line of the kilt, it's really too long for wearing with the kilt. The proportions are just out of whack.


  11. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Tobus For This Useful Post:


  12. #29
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    7,805
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    While it was common to see, in Victorian times, men wear the same jacket with their kilt as they would with their trousers, by the early 20th century it became de rigueur to wear a purpose-made kilt jacket with the kilt.

    Part of the reason was that mid-to-late 19th century men's jackets were cut to have one button near the top buttoned, and the jacket hang open in a wide inverted V, so that the sporran wasn't covered by the jacket.

    When men's jackets began being cut to hang straight down in front, the sporran would be covered, and purpose-made kilt jackets became universal.

    Wearing an ordinary jacket with kilts, nowadays, simply looks out-of-place to people familiar with Highland Dress. If I didn't have a proper kilt jacket I would wear a waistcoat with my kilt, or go to the event in "Saxon" dress.

    About creating co-ordinating colour palettes, in the old days men didn't have to put thought into that, due the quite limited number of options available from the big Highland Dress makers. (Yes the aristocracy could have bespoke clothing. I'm talking about mainstream Highland Dress.)

    In Victorian times one only sees tweed Day Dress jackets and selfcoloured hose in greys and browns. Exceptions are rare. So you put on your family tartan kilt, and your grey or brown accessories, and off you go.

    By the 1930s tweed Day Dress jackets are usually offered in Lovat blue and Lovat green with the occasional grey, brown, or fawn. I have one colour photo of gents gathered at a Scottish Highland Games in the 1950s and EVERY man is wearing Lovat blue or Lovat green.

    Likewise "Day" hose and bonnets were offered in a quite limited range of colours: Lovat blue, Lovat green, fawn, soft blue, and not much else.

    You can see that a gent could wear his family kilt and purchase any commercially available bonnet, jacket, and hose and would be nicely co-ordinated.

    The range of colours in Highland Dress accessories seen today would have been unthinkable in the old days. In the old days the makers limited our choices to what co-ordinated; today it's up to us, the consumer, to make these choices.

    As Donald C Stewart puts it:

    "The brilliant dyes employed today were not available in earlier times, and our forebears were spared the shattering colour schemes now occasionally seen...Then, the utmost that could be achieved was not too much; now, it may easily be."

    (He was writing of the colours chosen by the weavers for their tartans, but I feel this statement applies to accessories as well.)

    Victorian Highland Dress: wearing an ordinary sack coat with the kilt. Due to the jacket's cut the sporran isn't covered.



    Commercially available Highland Day Dress 1920s through 1960s: limited colour choices mean more or less co-ordinating outfits, here a dark blue bonnet, Lovat green jacket, and light blue hose



    Note here browns in hose and jacket, and red flashes, though these colours do not occur in the kilt. There's no sense of matching colours, rather the more or less random choices co-ordinate. It seems that this man served in the Argylls.



    Nowadays we have more choices!

    Last edited by OC Richard; 14th July 19 at 04:35 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  13. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  14. #30
    Join Date
    26th December 18
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For the length, this is my longest kilt jacket;

    IMG_20190627_1330576_2.jpg

    As you can see, it falls about mid-sporran and although it doesn't show in the photo, the sleeve length is a few inches longer than the jacket hem. Basically the bottom of the jacket sits around the red line while the cuff length is around the yellow line.

    Hope this helps,

    Shane

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0