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  1. #21
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    This is one of the best photos showing just how short/high waisted the traditional military doublets were made, and how high the traditional military kilts were.

    Look at the position of the waist of the outfit in relation to his elbows.



    When one sees the full uniform, the height of the waist-level doesn't jump out as being odd to us; but his belt is at his elbow height. Try putting on a belt at that spot and see how it looks to you.



    Photos of Victorian military men sans jackets are rare, here's one



    Here, pretty much any American will say "the jacket is too short" but it's actually the traditional length. It's the kilt that's too short.

    Look were the top of the kilt and the belt are in relation to his elbows.



    Catering to the non-traditional demand for ever-longer doublets, this horror is being sold by a Sialkot site (waist just above the wrists)



    For comparison, an actual military doublet (waist at the elbows)

    Last edited by OC Richard; 10th August 19 at 05:58 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  3. #22
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
    Location
    Beijing
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    Wearing my kilt at the natural waist has meant my shirts generally stay tucked. And a vest makes that doubly certain.

    Someone noted that overly-large or low armholes pull shirts up when you raise your arms. This is certainly true. This summer I've been back in the USA and I noticed that nearly all the shirts I'm seeing in stores have really low armholes. Which means a shirt that fits fine in the shoulders and around the neck and waist, stops fitting as soon as you try to actually move or do anything while wearing it. Not only do these shirts pull the tails over the waist, they pull at the buttons every time your elbows are not hanging at your sides.

    I showed this problem to the clerk in a well-known men's shop. He asked, "How often do you do that with your arms?" But the truth is, I pull my elbows back all the time to do things like put on a backpack, hat, or sunglasses, or to use a camera--let alone more athletic pursuits.

    So I can see why the issue might "arise" for those buying new, off-the-rack shirts.

    Andrew

  4. #23
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingandrew View Post
    This summer I've been back in the USA and I noticed that nearly all the shirts I'm seeing in stores have really low armholes. Which means a shirt that fits fine in the shoulders and around the neck and waist, stops fitting as soon as you try to actually move or do anything while wearing it. Not only do these shirts pull the tails over the waist, they pull at the buttons every time your elbows are not hanging at your sides.
    For sure this is a major issue with Highland jackets when worn by members of Pipe Bands.

    Traditional military doublets had high round armholes so you have free movement of your arms.

    Nowadays some firms are making the Argyll jackets that Pipe Bands wear with low oval armholes like men's suits. This might look nice when you're standing there doing nothing, but when you go to strike in your pipes that entire side of the jacket gets pulled up into your armpit along with the bag. It's worse for tenor drummers and Drum Majors who need full freedom of movement with their arms.

    Some firms are making Pipe Band specific Argyll jackets with higher-cut armholes and stretch fabric panels to solve this issue.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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