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  1. #1
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    Just plain kilts

    Years ago, I don't remember how many, there was a discussion here where a couple of members said they were only comfortable wearing solid colored utility or tactical kilts. The only tartan they could be comfortable in is USAKilts American Heritage, which is mostly black with very little color. Reading between the lines I got the impression they weren't secure enough in there manhood to wear sissified ordinary tartan kilts. I've had that in mind ever since, and wonder if there were a tartan burrowing its colors from manly solid colored kilts it might appeal to those that may not be comfortable in brighter tartans.

    Way back when LL Bean sold a plaid (I use that word in thd American sense) flannel shirt in a loden green with tan being the dominate colors, not much different than colors of tactical kilts sold by 5.11. I've been wearing my loden plaid shirt often during the colder season. I really like it and often think the plaid woven as P/V might appeal to a broad range of kilters. What are your thoughts?

    I've never ever had good luck posting pictures here in anything other than low resolution postage stamp sizes, but if there is enough interest I could try to put up a picture of the Bean plaid here.
    Benning School for Boys
    97th Company
    OC 5-68

  2. #2
    Join Date
    7th February 08
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    Digital camo kilts seem to satisfy some, with certain concerns about “manliness “, so I would think such a design might “ ease the pain”
    waulk softly and carry a big schtick

  3. #3
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    12th January 13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benning Boy View Post
    Years ago, I don't remember how many, there was a discussion here where a couple of members said they were only comfortable wearing solid colored utility or tactical kilts. The only tartan they could be comfortable in is USAKilts American Heritage, which is mostly black with very little color. Reading between the lines I got the impression they weren't secure enough in there manhood to wear sissified ordinary tartan kilts. I've had that in mind ever since, and wonder if there were a tartan burrowing its colors from manly solid colored kilts it might appeal to those that may not be comfortable in brighter tartans.

    Way back when LL Bean sold a plaid (I use that word in thd American sense) flannel shirt in a loden green with tan being the dominate colors, not much different than colors of tactical kilts sold by 5.11. I've been wearing my loden plaid shirt often during the colder season. I really like it and often think the plaid woven as P/V might appeal to a broad range of kilters. What are your thoughts?

    I've never ever had good luck posting pictures here in anything other than low resolution postage stamp sizes, but if there is enough interest I could try to put up a picture of the Bean plaid here.
    Hm... I would've guessed the opposite, that they'd want tartan to make it clear it was a KILT and not a SKIRT.

    ("Sissified"... they've never actually seen Highland games and the men who participate in them, have they??? Are these the same guys who think male ballet dancers are "sissy" and have clearly not seen how muscular those dancers are??)
    Here's tae us - / Wha's like us - / Damn few - / And they're a' deid - /
    Mair's the pity!

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  5. #4
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    6th July 07
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katia View Post
    Hm... I would've guessed the opposite, that they'd want tartan to make it clear it was a KILT and not a SKIRT.

    ("Sissified"... they've never actually seen Highland games and the men who participate in them, have they??? Are these the same guys who think male ballet dancers are "sissy" and have clearly not seen how muscular those dancers are??)
    I quite agree.

    When we view the tartan kilt from a historical point of view and particularly from a military historical point of view then the tartan kilt is seen in a far from “sissy” light.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 23rd March 20 at 03:47 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  7. #5
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    18th October 09
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    The idea of a "manly" tartan along the lines of the plaid LL Bean shirts that men are accustomed to wearing is an interesting idea. Might it function as a gateway drug to traditional tartans?

    I always took the plain/solid/selfcoloured canvas or denim Utilikilt fabric as just being a Utilikilt thing.

    At least here on the Left Coast, the initial reaction of the kilt-wearing men in the Pipe Band scene to Utilikilts was quite the opposite: they were derided as being "skirts".

    As far as I understand it, the whole concept of what are now called "utility kilts" was begun by the firm Utilikilt in the Seattle area. The founder/owner stated from the get-go that he would under no circumstances make Utilikilts in plaids/tartans. He was adamant from the start that Utilikilts were not kilts in the ordinary/traditional sense but a entirely new garment with a concomitant new Fashion Culture.

    And I think the huge popularity of Utilikilts has as much to do with the overall Fashion Culture as it does the garment itself. At least here, nearly all of the Utilikilt wearers I see are fully kitted out in accordance to that Fashion Culture with Doc Martens, scrunched-down socks, black t-shirts, and plenty of hair and tattoos.

    Certainly not the LL Bean crowd.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  8. #6
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    29th January 18
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    Off the top of my head, I think that both of these kilts would fit the bill for “masculine” and “understated”:
    https://www.kinlochanderson.com/shop...derson-breacan
    https://www.kinlochanderson.com/shop...n-autumn-tweed

    In the wake of the Great Male Renunciation in fashion, bright colors are strongly associated with femininity in most Western-influenced countries. Men are “supposed” to wear Black, Charcoal, Grey, Navy, and White. That’s it. Other colors are supposed to be small and incidental, like a red necktie. I don’t hold with that myself, obviously, and resistance to the renunciation is one of the factors that piqued my interest in highlandwear in the first place, but I think that it’s the perspective being communicated.

  9. #7
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    That Beau Brumell has a lot to answer for - his influence converted male attire from the flamboyant, with jewels, to the suit as known today, with elaborate cravat but otherwise unadorned.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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  11. #8
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    27th October 19
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    Don't know what the fuss is about. I feel very manly in my kilt, my wife loves me in it and I've got nothing but compliments. Funny, the only time I ever saw anyone else in a kilt that wasn't also carrying bagpipes was 2 guys wearing a utilikilts.

    Dave

  12. #9
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    I like the idea of the basic “plaid” tartan :-) I’m not sure it’s for the same market as utility-style (punk rock?) kilt-garments.

    I think that the informality of the utilikilt fueled some of it’s appeal, for me as well as others. I was in college when the company was still young, uncertain whether it was acceptable for me to wear Tartan, and the buy-in can be huge!! For most young men, I think it’s hard enough to weigh wearing a “non-standard” garment, even without the £425 price tag on the cheaper of those two beautiful examples that were posted above; and then they’d probably only be used on very specific occasions because the level of care they require is high. At the end of the nineties, I think you could get a utilikilt sewn in the company owner’s garage for less than a hundred dollars, machine washable, advertised bulletproof, and counter-culture chic.

    Of course, it still didn’t seem affordable to me, at the time :-)

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  14. #10
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    3rd January 06
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    On the South coast of England there are more and more people wearing kilts at the events I would be attending to play folk music. It is particularly noticable amongst the morris dancers at the height of the Summer heat - the Border morris sides wear black, mostly, and although it started off with black Utilikilts and then went on to black imitations, then black 'real' kilts and there are now proper tartan kilts being worn beneath the tatter jackets.
    kilts are worn to a lesser extent by the onlookers, often in a more traditional manner, with tweed jackets, or with waistcoat when shirtsleeve order is necessary to prevent heatstroke.
    The Cornish lads wear black kilts, sometimes with a white cross somewhere about it - to indicate the banner Peran, the county flag. Sandals, tee shirt and leather hat are almost a uniform for them.
    I suppose that kilts are not seen as strange or 'other' here - though there are some expectations of eccentricity, or association with the unruly and rebellious to some small extent, maybe due to the Scottish rugby fans who invade rather than just travel to matches in the excited but fairly orderly (by comparison) manner of other nations. Kilts, even in the brightest tartans, are not associated with femininity in my experience - I suspect anyone making that assumption might be in for a nasty shock.
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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