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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzbass View Post
    Very nice rendition.
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by grizzbass View Post
    Pilgrim Congregational uses the Methodist Hymnal and I'm not sure if it applies to others.
    Interesting!

    When I started collecting Hymnals from many denominations I saw that the United Methodist Hymnal is the largest, having 884 pieces. By comparison, the Southern Baptist Hymnal has 666 the Episcopal 710 and the LDS 341.

    Quote Originally Posted by grizzbass View Post
    I grew up Mormon...The Mormon Hymnal has several hymns based on folk pieces, Praise to the Man (Scotland the brave) and If I Could Hie to Kolob (The Star of the County Down) just off the head.
    Yes I've played Praise To The Man at LDS services. It's mostly the same as Scotland The Brave with small melodic changes here and there.

    Many of the old Hymn tunes are originally secular folk tunes, from England, Ireland, Wales, Germany, and so on. Many Hymn were originally like poems, written as a set of words, and it was up to choirs to choose which tunes to sing them to.

    An example is Amazing Grace, written as words only. There's no such tune "Amazing Grace", it never existed. Amazing Grace is now usually sung to NEW BRITAIN (it's customary to write tune names in all caps) but it can, and is, sung to many tunes. In the 19th century other tunes besides NEW BRITAIN were most common including FIDUCIA.

    I've heard Amazing Grace sung to KINGSFOLD as well.

    And it's only Hymns! Many people don't know that there's no such tune The Star-Spangled Banner. Our anthem is a poem/set of words and later, to sing it, people began using an old drinking-song, which we still use today.

    BTW The Star Of The County Down is one of many folk-songs and Hymns sung to the old English folk-tune KINGSFOLD.

    Here's the Hymn Amazing Grace being sung to the tune KINGSFOLD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCBrdCK7u9c

    Here's the Hymn Amazing Grace being sung to the tune FIDUCIA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmFKZmcGAW0
    Last edited by OC Richard; 11th September 20 at 04:57 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KennethSime View Post
    I measure a 5E width, and went years without realizing it. The first time I tried on a pair of foot-shape running shoes I felt so much relief! Now anytime someone's wearing Vibrams, Altras, Lems, or another foot-shape shoe I have to comment, it's like a little club (similar to Kilt wearers).

    The Boulder Boot is great. Highly recommended, especially if you've got rainy winters.
    I know this is completely off topic, but Vibram FiveFingers are amazing. I like to wear them running, but also sometimes when walking, even when kilted. Mine don't really go with my kilts, but they are so incredibly comfortable.

  4. #13
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    20th June 11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichiganKyle View Post
    I know this is completely off topic, but Vibram FiveFingers are amazing. I like to wear them running, but also sometimes when walking, even when kilted. Mine don't really go with my kilts, but they are so incredibly comfortable.
    I haven't actually tried VFFs, but I do enjoy foot shape shoes. VFFs sure have a cult-like following, I'll have to try them eventually.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Thanks!


    Interesting!

    When I started collecting Hymnals from many denominations I saw that the United Methodist Hymnal is the largest, having 884 pieces. By comparison, the Southern Baptist Hymnal has 666 the Episcopal 710 and the LDS 341.



    Yes I've played Praise To The Man at LDS services. It's mostly the same as Scotland The Brave with small melodic changes here and there.

    Many of the old Hymn tunes are originally secular folk tunes, from England, Ireland, Wales, Germany, and so on. Many Hymn were originally like poems, written as a set of words, and it was up to choirs to choose which tunes to sing them to.

    An example is Amazing Grace, written as words only. There's no such tune "Amazing Grace", it never existed. Amazing Grace is now usually sung to NEW BRITAIN (it's customary to write tune names in all caps) but it can, and is, sung to many tunes. In the 19th century other tunes besides NEW BRITAIN were most common including FIDUCIA.

    I've heard Amazing Grace sung to KINGSFOLD as well.

    And it's only Hymns! Many people don't know that there's no such tune The Star-Spangled Banner. Our anthem is a poem/set of words and later, to sing it, people began using an old drinking-song, which we still use today.

    BTW The Star Of The County Down is one of many folk-songs and Hymns sung to the old English folk-tune KINGSFOLD.

    Here's the Hymn Amazing Grace being sung to the tune KINGSFOLD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCBrdCK7u9c

    Here's the Hymn Amazing Grace being sung to the tune FIDUCIA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmFKZmcGAW0
    Thanks You'd think the Southern Baptists would have added or subtracted one song just to avoid the devil's number. The Mormons may have 341 but they really only use 50ish.
    When I was a young man in Iowa I told someone I really loved The House of the Rising Sun but wished it was more moral and they said you can sing amazing grace to the melody and they were right.

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  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzbass View Post
    I really loved The House of the Rising Sun but wished it was more moral and they said you can sing Amazing Grace to the melody and they were right.
    Yes I've heard that done, it's great.

    It's interesting how folk ballads change over time, they can travel from region to region, the specifics of the words change but the basic storyline remains. There are places called The House Of The Rising Sun in England and evidently it's originally an English ballad. The melody is supposedly related to the one used for the English balled Little Musgrave/Matty Groves.

    The most interesting ballad-family I know of is the one that started out in Scotland as Locke Hospital about an ill young man. There are versions where he's a sailor. British and Irish versions are often called The Unfortunate Rake.

    It was brought to the USA where in New Orleans it evolved into Saint James Infirmary and in Texas it evolved into The Streets Of Laredo. The details and melody change but the basic storyline remains.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    Yes I've heard that done, it's great.

    It's interesting how folk ballads change over time, they can travel from region to region, the specifics of the words change but the basic storyline remains. There are places called The House Of The Rising Sun in England and evidently it's originally an English ballad. The melody is supposedly related to the one used for the English balled Little Musgrave/Matty Groves.

    The most interesting ballad-family I know of is the one that started out in Scotland as Locke Hospital about an ill young man. There are versions where he's a sailor. British and Irish versions are often called The Unfortunate Rake.

    It was brought to the USA where in New Orleans it evolved into Saint James Infirmary and in Texas it evolved into The Streets Of Laredo. The details and melody change but the basic storyline remains.
    We sang an irreverent version of that when we were kids:

    "I see by your outfit that you are a cowboy,
    I see by your outfit that you're a cowboy too.
    We see by our outfits that we are both cowboys.
    If you get an outfit you an be a cowboy too."


    We were a long way from Cowboy country.
    Those ancient U Nialls from Donegal were a randy bunch.

  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninehostages View Post
    We sang an irreverent version of that when we were kids:

    "I see by your outfit that you are a cowboy,
    I see by your outfit that you're a cowboy too.
    We see by our outfits that we are both cowboys.
    If you get an outfit you an be a cowboy too."


    We were a long way from Cowboy country.
    I'm familiar with this version when sung by the Smothers Brothers.

  10. #18
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    I didn't know where it came from. We sure didn't make it up when we were 10 year olds. I hope that their estate won't come after me for copyright infringement!
    Those ancient U Nialls from Donegal were a randy bunch.

  11. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninehostages View Post
    I didn't know where it came from. We sure didn't make it up when we were 10 year olds. I hope that their estate won't come after me for copyright infringement!
    Don't need to worry too much about that - they're both still alive!

  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichiganKyle View Post
    Don't need to worry too much about that - they're both still alive!
    I'm glad to hear it! The World is a smarter place for that.

    They must be VERY elderly, though. I used to listen to them/watch them when I was a kid and I'm a Senior now that pretty girls call "Sir".
    Those ancient U Nialls from Donegal were a randy bunch.

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